Social Studies


Teaching in the Elementary School Classroom Contents | Reference Lists

Contents of section:


African American Studies

78.02.02 Booker T. Washington and W. E. B. Dubois: The Problem of Negro Leadership
This unit was designed for high school students, grades ten through twelve. The unit contains excellent background information on Booker T. Washington and W. E. B. Dubois. Lesson plans and activities could be adapted for fifth graders with additional resources from the library media specialist.

78.02.05 Migration North to the Promised Land
This unit, written for seventh grade Social Studies students centers, discusses the great migration of blacks from the rural south to northern industrial cities. In addition, the unit addresses issues concerning the post-Civil War and post-reconstruction conditions in the south. The unit can easily be adapted for second to fifth grade students. Lessons contain activities centered on human and urban geography, as well as history, political science and economics.

78.02.08 The Social Contributions of the Harlem Renaissance
This unit examines the social contributions of Harlem intellectuals during the decade from 1918-29. Intended for middle-school students, it could easily be adapted for middle and upper elementary students, 3-5. The unit gives a beautiful account of the West Indian influence on the Harlem Renaissance. It contains excellent reference material.

78.02.09 Two Controversial Cases in New Haven History: The Amistad Affair (1839) and the Black Panther Trials (1970)
This study is designed to make a descriptive comparison of two dramatic revolts for freedom in New Haven. A wealth of information is given in the unit describing the history of the Amistad affair and the Black Panther trials. This unit could be adapted for lower and upper elementary grade levels, 1-5.

80.06.09 Slavery in Connecticut 1640-1848
This unit traces the history of slavery in Connecticut. It contains information that could be adapted to the upper elementary grades 4-5.

81.01.08 Yet Do I Marvel: A Comparative Study of Black American Literature
Unit presents black history through the study of African American authors, focusing on the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920's and the black Revolutionary period the 1960's. It contains excellent background information. Lesson plans and work sheets could be modified for middle and upper elementary students, 3-5.

85.05.01 Black Emancipators of the Nineteenth Century
This unit focuses on emancipators who spoke about abolishing slavery in the United States. Information is given on individuals who stages slave rebellions and who escaped slavery. An attempt to provide students with a more realistic view of slavery in the context of American history is the emphasis of this unit. Recommended as a resource for teachers in grades 3, 4 and 5.

85.05.03 Lincoln, the Great Emancipator?
Discussing the enslavement of African Americans and how slavery relates to the Lincoln presidency, this unit is a resource for fourth and fifth grade teachers who may desire additional information and perspective.

86.04.09 The Poetry of 20th Century Black America
This unit studies African American poetry and its related history to help stimulate and prepare students to write their own poetry. Suggests possible lessons and contains historical information. It is adaptable to grades 3-5.

87.01.05 Slavery: The American Way
The unit is intended to give the student a good understanding about the historical events that took place during the development of slavery on the American Continent. This unit is easily adaptable for middle and upper elementary students, 3-5. Students will analyze the main reasons that led to the need for slave labor, locate areas on a map, and use reading and writing skills throughout the unit.

87.03.02 Non-Violent Protest Through the Ages
The major concepts of this unit include Dr. Martin Luther King's view on non-violence. The unit emphasizes how civil disobedience has long been exercised in protest of unjust laws. This unit could be adapted for middle and upper elementary students, and use in conjunction with Project Charlie for helping students understand that problems can be solved through non-violence.

87.03.03 Portraits: The Black Experience in American Culture
This unit exposes students to black writers who have written of the black experience in American culture, both fiction and non-fiction. Students view specific works, which examine the black struggle to survive in our American culture as well as the search for self-identity. Teachers of any grade level could draw information from the valuable background information in the unit. The activities are adaptable for upper/middle elementary students, 3-5.

87.03.07 The Roots of the Afro-American Culture - The Artist Approach
The focal point of this unit will show how white Europeans tried to force their values on African Americans. The unit provides a type of reference that represents, in large measure, the totality of the past and present life and culture of African Americans in art. The unit contains great background information on African American art for teachers of all grade levels. Lessons adaptable for all grade levels.

88.02.05 The Insights of American Blacks During the 19th and 20th Centuries in New Haven, Connecticut
This unit highlights the contributions of African American individuals and organizations within the New Haven community during the 1880s and early 1900s. Resources include written and oral history accounts and a family tree handout. Recommended for teachers in grades 3, 4, and 5.

89.01.05 The Impact of the Music of the Harlem Renaissance on Society
The main focus of this unit is on the people, places, and music of the Harlem Renaissance from 1918-1933. The unit contains excellent background information for teachers on the musical heritage of African Americans. Lesson can be adapted for upper elementary students, grade 5.

89.01.13 The Church Community: The Oldest Black Church, Past and Present
Although designed for students in grades 5-8, this unit could be adapted to include the lower and middle elementary grades. The main focus of the unit is the church community that of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church founded by James Varick in 1796. The unit also includes African Americans such Frederick Douglas, Sojouner Truth, Harriet Tubman, etc.

89.05.08 The Roots of the Modern Day African Americans and the Suggested Motivation For A Bright Future: Actual Experiences of Booker T. Washington, Frederick Douglas and Joseph Sengbe (Cinque)
The unit seeks to educate youths about African American roots. It contains interesting historical background information that could be adapted for all elementary grade levels, K-5.

90.02.08 The Amistad Affair: Problem Solving Applied Through Theater
This unit is adaptable for middle and upper elementary grade students, 3-5. The unit centers on the Amistad Affair and is divided into eight-week segments. Each class contains theater games and activities designed to enhance a particular facet of problem solving.

90.03.09 Famous Afro-Americans Historical Sites Recognized by the National Park System
Adaptable for middle and upper elementary students, this unit identifies National Historical sites that have been named in honor of famous African Americans. The unit contains a wealth of information about the location, history, and reason why each site was designated as a National Historical site.

90.04.05 How the African American Storyteller Impacts the Black Family and Society
Although this unit has been developed for sixth graders during Black History month, the lesson plans are easily adaptable for all grade levels. The main emphasis is on black storytellers as they emerged from slavery to the present. Some of the storytellers included are: Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Winnie Mandela, Bill Costy, etc.

90.04.09 The Art and Culture of the Afro-American
This ten-week unit is designed to help students learn about the art and culture of the African American. Students build a stronger identify of themselves that can reduce poor self-esteem, cynicism and apathy. Activities and strategies are adaptable for upper elementary students, grade 5.

90.05.09 American Families: Portraits of African American Families
Students in middle and upper elementary grades would profit by this unit. If selections are too difficult, the teacher in class could read parts. The unit begins with a study of the African American family from a historical perspective. It uses the oral tradition as well as various family-related poems.

90.05.10 The Family That Endured An Historical View of African American Families As Seen through American Literature and Art
This unit centers on the historical development of the African American family by fostering the kind of understandings that will allow students to see themselves, their family, and their ancestors as part of an institution whose role is one to be admired. Adaptable for middle and upper elementary grades, the unit involves the use of literature, paintings, photographs, and artifacts to reinforce the concept of the African American family as a positive force.

91.01.07 African American Literature: A Contrast Between North and South
Although the literature recommended for 11th grade English students is too difficult for elementary grade children, students in middle and upper grades would find the background history of this unit interesting. The unit covers the black experience in the United States, from the period after the Civil War through the Great Migration to the north, culminating with the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920's.

91.03.01 Langston Hughes: Voice Among Voices
Many of the readings are too advanced for elementary grade students; however, many of the readings can be read in part or as a whole to the students. The background information about Langston Hughes would be of interest to all elementary students.

91.03.02 Prince Hall and His Organization of Black Free Masons in the United States
This unit was written for middle and upper elementary grade students. It centers on the story of Prince Hall, organizer of Negro Masonry in the United States. He was also an abolitionist and spokesman in regard to all of the conditions which made the circumstances of Negroes intolerable and nonproductive.

91.03.04 Use of John Johnson's Life Story in Conjunction With Other Black Entrepreneurs as Role Models for Potential Black Businessmen
The unit centers on the lives of Mary McLeod Bethune, Booker T. Washington, and Jake Simmons, Jr. It compares the role models that each person followed in their search for success. Although written for high school students, middle and upper elementary students would profit by this unit.

91.03.08 Dark Voices From Unmarked Graves
Although the narratives chosen are too advanced for elementary students, they could be told or read to middle and upper grades. The unit focuses on samplings of oral and written testimony about slavery from slaves as they experienced it and from former slaves as they remembered it. The narratives are analyzed and reenacted in the classroom.

91.03.09 Building Dreams - Who Is There to Help You?
This unit centers around two texts, Roll of Thunder Hear My Cry, and Maggie's American Dream. Although the unit is geared for fifth grade students, it could be adapted for lower and middle elementary students, grades 1-3, where the teacher reads or tells the stories to the students. The lesson plans contain many questions for analysis of the stories and role-playing activities.

91.03.10 Amazing Grace
The unit presents specific events in the lives of Maya Angelou, famous author, and James Comer, psychiatrist. The term "Jim Crow" will be discussed, so that students will have background knowledge for understanding the materials that will be presented. The unit is adaptable for middle and upper elementary students, 3-5.

92.03.02 Tales from the City
The Harlem Renaissance is the concentration of this unit. The information available can be adapted to grades 4 and 5. Literature of the Harlem Renaissance is the main discussion in this unit.

92.03.04 Cathedrals, Pyramids and Mosques
African history is discussed in this unit. The lessons and activities are best used in the upper grades, but some can be adapted to grades 4 and 5. This unit contains good background information for teachers.

92.03.07 Recognizing Voice and Finding your Own Voice in Writing about the City
This unit is best described as a resource for teachers in grades 4 and 5. The Harlem Renaissance is discussed. Literature from the period of the Harlem Renaissance is included.

92.04.02 Colonial Living: A Look at the Arts, Crafts, History and Literature of Early Americans
This unit covers many aspects of Colonial Life that are overlooked as well as common Colonial Life activities. It is written for students in the upper grades but can be adapted to grades 4 and 5. The discussion of the attitude of African Americans toward slavery in the United States is also addressed.

95.04.02 Literature and Art through Our Eyes: The African American Children
This unit uses prose, poetry, and art to examine the issues of self-awareness, family, community, and friends primarily as they relate to African American children. Integrated approach. The unit is suitable for grades 2-5.

96.01.01 An Analysis of Jim Crow Laws and Their Effect on Race Relations
Designed for first grade, this unit could easily be adapted to higher elementary grades. Focuses on the effects of discriminatory laws. Literature based, emphasizing decision-making and self-awareness. Lessons include a mock segregated role-play, a poetry lesson, and discussion of Dr. King's role as a hero. Relates well to social development curriculum.

96.01.02 Langston Hughes: Artist and Historian
Unit uses the poetry of Langston Hughes to study the African American experience in the United States from the 1920's to the 1960's. Also uses works of art and photography to understand discrimination against African Americans, Japanese, and the poor. Though designed for grades 6, the material could be adapted for use in upper elementary grades.

96.01.04 Justice Demands an End to Segregation, But it Does Not End
Designed for grades 7-8, this unit emphasizes the course of civil rights and civil liberties for African Americans in the United States from 1954-1964. Contains historical information that might be of value to elementary teachers. Some activities might be adapted for grades 4-5.

96.01.07 A New Generation of Fighters
Though designed to inspire middle school students to stand up against racism, this unit contains some material and activities that could be adapted to elementary use. Contains lengthy account of Robert Coles who worked with Ruby Bridges.

96.03.02 Using Film and Literature to Examine Uncle Remus: A Comparison and Analysis of the Film-Song of the South
Designed for a second grade, this unit centers around the Disney film, Song of the South, using the Uncle Remus figure to develop a more accurate picture of slavery and the importance of story telling during this period. Elements could be applied to any elementary grade. Interdisciplinary approach.

96.03.05 Recognizing Stereotypical Images of African Americans in Television and Film
For a fifth grade, which is probably its lowest grade limit, this unit uses television and film to help students to, first, understand stereotyping and, then, be able to recognize it presence in film and on TV as a force that can have damaging effects. Activities and discussions are thought provoking. Unit is part of a school team.

97.02.05 Examining African American Culture through the Use of Children's Literature
This unit examines African American culture by using children's literature. It emphasizes building self-esteem and positive relationships. Interdisciplinary. The unit is suitable for grades 2-5. Relates well to social development goals.

97.02.08 Celebrate a People
Unit includes a picture book resource listing and ways to incorporate Afro centric literature into the curriculum. Interdisciplinary. Aimed at grades K-2.

97.03.01 Struggle of Black Women
Some parts of this unit could be used with upper elementary students to help build self-esteem and to develop an understanding of the obstacles faced by black women. Relates well to social development curriculum.

97.05.03 How to Blues
Students' understanding of African American culture is broadened through a study of the history, philosophy, and performers of the blues. Suggests related musical activities in which students might participate. This unit is suitable for grades 4-5.

97.05.04 Finding the Rhythm of Blues in Children's Poetry, Art, and Music
This unit, a language based, integrated approach focuses on slavery in the United States, along with the blues ideology. Focus on music. It is suitable for grades 1-5.

97.05.07 Sing Two Stanzas and Rebel in the Morning: The Role of Black Religious Music in the Struggle for Freedom
This unit examines the role of black religious music in the African American struggle for freedom and civil rights. Uses an integrated approach. Focus on music. It is suitable for grades 4-5.

97.05.08 Building Character: Remaining Resilient, Resourceful, and Responsible in the Face of Adversity
In this unit, students are exposed to the blues culture as a means of understanding and appreciating the African American struggle. Focus on Music. The unit is suitable for grades 4-5.

98.01.03 Slavery of Africans in the Americas: Resistance to Enslavement
Although written for grades 6-8, this unit can easily be adapted for grades 1-5. The unit uses film and other media to show the various forms and ways African and African American slaves resisted their enslavement in the Americas. There is special emphasis on the slave songs and maroon societies of slaves.

98.01.05 A Film and Literature Study of the African American Migration
Written for grade 2, the unit is easily adaptable for grades 1-6. The unit uses films such as The Promised Land, Goin’ to Chicago, and The Killing Floor to convey the messages of the migration movement. Students demonstrate their understanding of the migration movement through written works, discussions, and illustrations. The unit includes a great page on possible activities to accompany the study.

98.01.09 Discrimination and the Struggle for Equality: African Americans in Professional Baseball: A Reflection of the Civil Rights Movement
This unit developed for an understanding of Black baseball and the Negro Leagues as they existed in the United States during the days of segregated professional baseball could be adapted for all elementary grades K-5. The study relates to an examination of African American history from slavery through the Civil Rights Movement. The unit includes topics for discussion and awareness such as family events, showmanship, Black press, segregation, etc. Lesson plans are detailed, loaded with activities, and integrate curriculum areas.

98.02.03 African Myths and What They Teach
Written for grade three, this unit can easily be adapted for grades 1-5. The unit presents some of the many myths that deal with nature, human behavior, and creation. The stories presented are used to discuss with children ideas about friendship, manners, and scientific truths, which they can apply to their own lives. The unit contains a list of integrated activities that can be used with the myths.

98.02.04 Three African Trickster Myths/Tales: Primary Style
Using an interdisciplinary approach this unit can be used in grades K-5. The unit presents many teacher-ready work sheets that can be used in grades 1-4. Myths included in the unit are "Anansi’s Rescue from the River," "Ijapa and Yanrinbo Swear an Oath," and Zomo the Rabbit.

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Diversity

81.02.05 China: Portrait of Change
Presented to high school students, this unit could be adapted for any elementary classroom curriculum regarding the history. This is a very resourceful unit on geography, history, and culture of China. However, a word of caution, there has been many changes in China since 1981.

82.02.08 His Story/Her Story/Your Story
This unit utilizes autobiographies and biographies in an effort to inform students of African American history. Key topics are social conditions, personal experiences, and the economics of African American communities. Recommended for grades 4 and 5.

82.05.03 Multicultural Education: A Calendar of Ethnic Festivals and Celebrations
Students participating in this unit’s lessons will have hands-on experiences in a variety of ethnic festivals and celebrations through music, dance, and folk craft instruction. Multi-ethnic foods are also prepared through this unit. A very adaptable unit for grades Kindergarten through 5, it can also encourage parent and community involvement.

82.06.10 Family Life in America: Past, Present and Future
The history of the American family is the focus of this unit. The definition of the American family and how it has been altered as the nation grew is a resource to teachers studying family life and American history. This unit can be adapted to grades 4 and 5.

88.02.01 The Cajuns: Natives with a Difference!
This unit, written specifically for students studying the French language, examines the history and culture of Acadians and Cajuns who settled in Louisiana. The students explore how the French culture of the Acadians and the Cajuns has influenced the culture of the United States. Activities span literature, writing and art. Recommended as a resource for grades 4 and 5.

92.02.04 Adventure in the Caribbean Effects of the Discovery of Haiti, Martinique and Guadeloupe
This unit is a resource for lower grade teachers. The history of Haiti, Martinique and Guadeloupe is discussed. Teachers in grades 4 and 5 will appreciate the lessons and activities. This is great for diversity projects.

92.02.05 Rediscovering the Aztec Indians
The Aztec Indians are the focus of this unit. Teachers in grades K–5, easily use the information relating to history; however, the lessons and activities are better suited for grades 4 and 5. This unit can also be applied to The Arts.

98.01.08 Teaching Ethnicity and Race through Films
Upper elementary grades, 4-5 could benefit from this unit written to teach ethnicity and race through films. The unit presents movie reviews and discussion questions for five films about ethnicity: Far and Away, Avalon, A Bronx Tale, The Long Walk Home, and Mi Familia. The unit concludes with a brief discussion of inaccuracies and misimpressions in Hollywood film.

98.02.05 Universal Myths and Symbols: Animal Creatures and Creation
Using an interdisciplinary approach this unit was written for second grade children but can be adapted for grades K-5. The unit brings myths and its language to today’s generation by exploring the immense wealth of mythological creation stories. The lessons focus on the role that the animal plays in the stories, and takes a close look at the Phoenix as representative of mythological creatures.

98.05.01 Who’s Who in America? Multicultural Achievers A to Z: Past and Present
This unit is interdisciplinary in approach and includes areas such as reading, science, art, writing, and some physical activities. Although written for grade k, this unit can easily be adapted to include all elementary grades K-5. The main objective of this unit is to help children celebrate the achievements of individuals of different ethnic groups by focusing on the contributions made in the fields of music, sports, science, etc. The unit provides children the opportunity to read about the dreams, aspirations, and goals of people who were once children like themselves.

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Hispanic American/Latino Studies

80.06.08 Puerto Rican Cultural Differences in Politics
Though aimed at older students, this unit contains background information that could be adapted to upper elementary classrooms, grades 4-5.

81.01.05 The Hispanic View of the Urban Setting
Presented to advanced students in the Bilingual Program. The unit encompasses selected readings, class discussion, trips, films and lectures. Although written for a high school Bilingual class, the unit could be adapted for middle and upper elementary grade students, 3-5. Gives great information on the Puerto Rican migration to the city.

84.03.02 Hispanic Immigrants: Trials and Tribulations
Although written for high school Spanish classes, parts could be extracted in connection with any unit about Hispanics and their neighborhoods. One interesting notation: Little Italy of New York City is mentioned in the unit. Today Little Italy is owned and surrounded by Chinatown. It remains as a tourist attraction.

84.03.03 Pre-Colombian Mythology
The unit on Pre-Colombian Mythology describes the culture of the Mesoamerican Indians through art and myths. Two legends are adapted into skits. There is great background information about the history of this era for any grade level teacher. Parts could be extracted for any grade level, K-5.

84.03.07 Latin American Women
The unit speaks about differences in males and females in Latin culture with emphasis on women writers. Good resource material for those studying Latino culture in the middle and upper elementary grades, 3-5.

84.03.08 The Art of the Puerto Rican People
Through the use of art, the history of the Puerto Rican people from Pre-Colombian times to today is emphasized in this unit. History and art lessons can easily be adapted for all elementary grades. Some of the materials maybe difficult to acquire (e.g. slide sets and paintings.)

86.02.01 Spain in Puerto Rico: The Early Settlements
Unit contains a considerable amount of information on the history, geography, and major cities of Puerto Rico, which both bilingual and regular education elementary teachers could use at almost any level.

86.02.03 1986 Capsule: Hispanic Influence in the New World
This unit contains a considerable amount of information on Hispanic history and influence in The New World. Elementary teachers at any grade level could adapt some of this Material to supplement Hispanic and/or diversity studies.

87.01.01 An Analysis of "The Highroad of Saint James"
Although written and based on literature for eighth grade students, the unit could be adapted for upper elementary students. "The Highroad of Saint James" is an allegorical pilgrimage set against the historical background of sixteenth century Flanders, France, Spain, and Cuba. Throughout the story, Juan, a common name to represent the common man, gives us a picture of the history and culture of Cuba.

87.01.02 Studio Art Lessons Based on Latin American Art and Crafts
A beautiful unit based on arts and crafts of Latin American countries that could be adapted for middle and upper elementary students, 3-5. Many examples are given through pictures, and narrative along with detailed instructions for making crafts in the classroom.

87.01.04 Puerto Rico…Its Land, History, Culture, and Literature
Presents an overview of the geography, history, and culture of Puerto Rico and then focuses on its literature. Could easily be adapted for middle and upper elementary students. Gives a wealth of information on the culture of Puerto Rico.

87.01.06 Improving thinking skills of Spanish Learning Disabled Students Through the analysis of Latin-American Short Stories
The unit helps students understand the need for comparison in any life situation. There are many excellent work sheets and activities listed that can be adapted for middle and upper elementary grade students, 3-5. Parts could be adapted for lower elementary students, 1-2. The unit covers two short stories from Central America and from Puerto Rico. The main emphasis is on Christmas in Costa Rica and Puerto Rico.

89.03.02 The Heritage of Puerto Rico and Cuba
The unit includes a comparative study of Puerto Rico and Cuba and its relation to the rest of the Caribbean. It gives an overview of the contributions of Latin America culture in the United States, the histories of Puerto Rico and Cuba, and writers and their times. Can be adapted for upper elementary grade students, grade 5.

90.01.07 In Search of the "Yo Latino - Americano"
Although written primarily for Spanish classes, the unit contains a wealth of information for any teacher searching for material about the Spanish-speaking world. Hands-on activities can be used with upper elementary students.

91.02.06 The Heritage and Culture of Puerto Ricans
This beautiful unit can easily be adapted to include lower elementary grade children. The unit is intended to provide students with opportunities to learn more about Hispanic people through a study of the heritage and culture of Puerto Ricans. Lesson plans include hands-on activities and work sheets.

92.02.03 The Culture of Conquest in the Modern World
This unit contains information on Latin American culture. It can be easily integrated with most diversity curricula. The lessons, resources and activities are recommended for grades K-5.

92.02.06 Dividing the Spoils: Portugal and Spain in South America
Covering basic Latin American history, this unit can be used as a resource for all grade levels. The lessons and various other aspects of the unit are best suited for grades 4 and 5.

97.01.01 Chicano and Puerto Rican Literature
Designed for middle school Spanish classes, this unit places its emphasis on Latina writers, particularly Puerto Rican and Mexican American women. Includes information on Chicano literature and authors. Portions of the suggested literature, the background information, and possible lessons could be modified for some upper elementary classrooms.

97.01.02 Reflections in a Latin American Mirror
Unit introduces students to Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Puerto Rico, Guatemala, Mexico, and Chile through poetry, folklore, and contemporary fiction. Interdisciplinary approach. This unit is suitable for any elementary group.

97.01.04 A Close Look at Mexico
Designed for grades 2-4, this unit uses hands-on activities to help children understand the culture of Mexico. Interdisciplinary approach. Has something for any elementary level.

97.01.06 Twentieth Century Latin American Writhing: Books, Stories, Folktales, Poetry, and More
This unit uses stories, folktales, poetry, rhymes, and songs to teach students about Hispanic culture. Integrated approach. Aimed at grades 2-4.

97.01.10 Short Novels, Stories, and Poetry of the Latin Americas
This unit suggests short novels, stories, and poetry from contemporary Latin American authors to be used with elementary students. Interdisciplinary approach. Suitable for grades K-5.

97.02.06 Understanding Hispanic/Latino Culture and History through the Use of Children's Literature
This unit uses children's literature to develop a better understanding and appreciation of Hispanic/Latino culture and history. Interdisciplinary approach. Recommended for grades 3-5.

98.01.07 Heroes and Villains of the Rain Forest: Latin American History through Film
The unit was written for grades 7-12, but can be adapted for upper elementary grades 4-5. Ten historical films that are set in rain forests are guides to Latin American history. Topics included in the unit are Discovery and Conquest, Political Divisions, In the Name of God, The Fate of the Indigenous Peoples, The Haves and the Have Nots, The Burden of Eternal Vigilance. Lesson plans give many suggestions for student analysis.

99.02.07 Broken Shields/Enduring Culture
Although written for sixth grade students, the unit can be adapted to include grades 3-5. The unit is divided into two sections. Part one is Picturing the World. Students work with compasses and then label the walls of the classroom with the four directions of the compass written in a number of languages. In addition, students work with maps, marking their own trip to Mesoamerica with Maya and Aztec ‘glyphs.’ They make screen fold books in which, like the Maya and the Aztec, they can record important information. Part two is Living in the World. Students construct a small Maya village, exploring its ecology and begin research projects on Aztec as well as Maya topics, culminating in a fiesta for families or other classes in which they present their work.

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Immigration

88.02.03 Immigration into an Urban Industrialized Northeast: 1879-1914
This unit is a comparative study of the conditions that lured the Italians, Slavs and African Americans to the industrialized urban centers of the United States. Examining the manner in which these people were received by the then present population, this unit supplies significant background information. Although the overall subject matter is meant for older students, this unit can be used as resource for grades 4 and 5.

88.02.06 The American Experience
Through the study of immigration in America, students will become aware of the difficulties faced by immigrants in the past and present. This unit relates to the cultural heritages of most New Haven students and contains significant background information for teachers. Recommended as a resource for grades 4 and 5.

90.05.07 Irish Immigrant Families in Mid-Late 19th Century America
The strategies in this unit include reading first-hand accounts of immigrants' lives through diaries, letters, ballads, and songs. Although written for high school students, some of the literature could be read to middle and upper elementary students, (grades 3- 5), and used for student discussion and writing. Students imagine themselves as an Irish immigrant coming to America and describe their experiences in a personal journal.

96.04.06 Coming to America: Opportunities, Risks, Consequences
Using an interdisciplinary approach, this unit explores the opportunities and challenges encountered by immigrants. Contains pupil-engaging activities. Recommended for grades 3-5.

96.04.07 Crossing the Border, A Study of Immigration through Literature
Unit attempts to help upper elementary students understand the history, challenges, and contributions of immigrants to the United States. This unit contains Cloze reading and language arts connections. Interdisciplinary approach.

96.04.09 Moving Communities and Immigration into the Bilingual Classroom
In order to develop an understanding of the immigrant experience, this unit examines the factors that accompany immigration. Families share in some activities. It is suitable for most elementary situations. Interdisciplinary approach.

96.04.11 Footsteps to Liberty: A Journal Journey
Through a variety of activities that should easily involve pupils, this unit follows the steps taken during immigration. Interdisciplinary approach. It is suitable for grades 1-5.

99.03.02 Those Who Built New Haven
This unit allows students to obtain detailed knowledge of the their city’s history through the story of those who immigrated and worked here. Students explore the struggles and triumphs of some of the diverse groups who have contributed to New Haven over the past three hundred and fifty years. The unit focuses upon the unique nature of the immigration experience for individuals and ethnic groups within New Haven. The unit contains excellent work sheets and reference materials for teachers and students along with background information from John Davenport to Frank Pepe. The unit also contains an interesting field trip to Judge’s Cave on West Rock. The unit is recommended for grades 4-12.

99.03.07 The Non-Immigrant Immigrants: Puerto Ricans
The purpose of this unit is to present some of the ingredients that have gone into making the rich culture of Puerto Rico, the forces that have caused Puerto Ricans both to leave the island and to return to it, and the resiliency that Puerto Ricans must have to preserve their identity as a people. Although the unit is recommended for grades 11 and 12, there is a wealth of information that any classroom teacher would benefit by when using a unit on Latino culture.

99.03.08 St. Patrick – Symbol of Irishness
This unit introduces students to the story of St. Patrick and the history of the Irish in America by exploring the history of New Haven’s St. Patrick’s Day parade. The unit is recommended for grades 5-8 and gives excellent background information for the teachers and students.

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Law

84.02.08 The Athenian Court and the American Court System
This unit gives an overview of the Athenian and the U.S. court system. The Athenian courts discussed in this unit existed in the second half of the fifth century and the first half of the fourth century B.C. Parts could be extracted for upper elementary students, grade 5.

87.03.08 The United States Constitution and Selected Amendments
The unit provides the origin and history of the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, Bill of Rights, and the additional selected Amendments. Students are involved in the process of thinking, writing, and rethinking. The unit contains great background information for teachers of all grade levels. Lessons adaptable for middle/upper elementary students, grades 3-5.

89.01.09 "Lynch Law" - An American Community Enigma
This unit contains a lot of useful background information concerning lynching in American history. It does not contain lesson plans adaptable for the elementary grades, but teachers could use the material in writing their own.

95.03.03 Understanding Criminal Justice
Activities in this unit help students learn about crime, our justice system, and Constitutional rights. Designed for grades 4-6, but elements can be used at all levels.

95.03.06 Living to Avoid the Criminal Justice System
Using an integrated approach, this unit focuses on conflict resolution, interpersonal relationships, and parental involvement. It attempts to develop the skills needed to avoid later problems with the law. Relates well to social development curriculum. Suitable for grades K-5.

95.03.08 You and the Law-Beating the Odds
Though generally aimed at older students, this unit contains some activities applicable to elementary students. Relates well to social development curriculum.

96.01.06 Multicultural Issues and the Law: Gender and Race Based Schooling
Designed for middle and high school students, this unit discusses the pros and cons of schooling based on gender and/or race segregation and its relationship to the law. Contains information that might be adapted to fourth of fifth grade classroom.

96.01.08 The Impact of Culture on United States Law
This unit examines the clashes that sometimes occur between religion and the law. Some of the material covered might be used in upper elementary level graces to develop an increased understanding of diversity, but most of unit does not apply elementary grades.

96.01.12 Affirmative Action Debate
This unit discusses the history and pros and cons of affirmative action. Activities and general content are suitable to upper elementary grades 3-5. Relates well to social development curriculum.

96.01.14 Why Do We Have to Suffer from the Rights of Others?
This unit discusses positive values and conflict resolution as solutions to some of society's problems. Unit would fit equally well in the area of social development studies. Designed for grades K-8.

98.04.01 Democracy in Action
Written for grades K-4, this unit can be adapted to include grade 5. Each week students will be introduced to a new American political thinker such as Cesar Chavez, Jane Addams, Sojourner Truth and Harriet Beecher Stowe. Students will solve problems at class meetings and engage in dramatics as their favorite political thinker. The students will be introduced to the art of murals and marionettes. Included in the unit is a section for making a marionette.

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Miscellaneous

78.03.01 The American Economy
This unit could be adapted for middle and upper elementary students. The unit seeks to have students gain a basic understanding of how our economic system works. Good background information and activities, (e.g. visit a loan officer at a local bank and apply for a loan.)

80.02.03 Comic Books: Superheroes/Heroines, Domestic Scenes, and Animal Images
Though designed for middle school students, this unit examines the history of the comic book. The unit offers opportunities to integrate with art. Could be interdisciplinary in approach for upper elementary grades.

81.01.02 Madras (India) and Boston - A Comparative Study and Analysis
This is an interesting unit that gives a brief history and background of each great city - Madras and Boston. Students develop parallel comparisons and differences through suggested readings. Designed for eight grade students. Could be adapted for middle and upper elementary grade students, 3-5.

81.01.06 Past and Present New York through a Comparative Study of Photography and Poetry
Although written for high school students, ideas could be extracted, modified and adapted for any elementary class. Good background information on photography and history of New York City.

81.02.02 Pirates, Pieces of Eight, and Pacific Nights
The unit is based upon Robert Louis Stevenson's writings: Treasure Island, Kidnapped, A Child's Garden of Verses, and The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Although the literature is geared for eight grade students, the topic of pirates is intriguing to elementary school students. Perhaps portions could be read to middle and upper elementary school students, 3-5.

82.05.05 Countries of South America
In this unit, students investigate the major countries of South America. The investigation includes population, natural resources and economics. The unit’s strong emphasis on geography lends itself to grades 2-5 as a resource.

84.02.07 The Grouch by Menander - An Example of Greek New Comedy
Students and teachers alike can enjoy the slapstick humor of Greek New Comedy, originally presented 2,000 years ago, as if it were written yesterday. The unit contains background material on Menander's life and on Greek Old, Middle, and New Comedy. Adaptable for upper elementary students, grade 5.

85.04.04 The Geophysics and Cultural Aspects of the Greater Antilles
This unit examines the influence of geography upon a region’s culture. The emphasis of this unit is the West Indies and the surrounding islands. Students will gain knowledge in the use of topographical maps and connect the information to the ethnic groups that migrated to the West Indies. Recommended as a resource for teachers in grade 4 and 5.

85.06.02 Mexican Culture Taught through the Aztec Calendar
This unit uses a study of the Aztec calendar to add a different perspective to the standard Spanish language class curriculum. Six calendar designs and a detailed chart of the eighteen months of the calendar are included. Information regarding ceremonies that coincide with the various months of the Aztec year is also provided. Recommended for grades 3, 4 and 5.

85.07.04 Dinosaurs: Here Yesterday, Gone Today
This unit focuses on the history of. Adaptable to all grade levels, the history of dinosaurs on the earth is outlined and detailed throughout this unit. Kindergarten through grade 5 teachers will find this unit useful in their study of dinosaurs and the earth at the time they existed. This unit is a good resource for those teachers interested in visiting the Peabody Museum’s collection of dinosaurs, or any other museum collection of dinosaurs.

87.01.02 Studio Art Lessons Based on Latin American Art and Crafts
A beautiful unit based on arts and crafts of Latin American countries that could be adapted for middle and upper elementary students, 3-5. Many examples are given through pictures, and narrative along with detailed instructions for making crafts in the classroom.

90.01.05 Parallel Studies of the Afro-American and Puerto Rican Experience in America
This unit examines the commonalty of experiences for both the African American and Puerto Rican cultures. The emphasis is on New York because it became the focal point of settlement for both groups. It is easily adaptable for all elementary grade levels, K-5.

90.02.07 "Come - Alive" Social Studies; A Study of Cultures through Play - Writing
This unit written for upper elementary students combines play writing and the dramatic arts with the study of the river cultures of ancient Egypt. The unit contains a study of Egyptian myth, economic life, politics, history, and arts. It culminates in a performance for a school audience.

90.02.11 Melting Pot Theater: Teaching for Cultural Understanding
This is a great unit easily adaptable for all elementary grade level students of all abilities, K-5. The unit contains an abundance of activities and games to teach dance, drama, and music. Three countries, U.S.A., Puerto Rico, the U.S.S.R., Russia, and Africa, Ghana are used to study culture in the unit.

91.01.03 "Carefully Taught": The Effect of Regions on Prejudice
A beautiful unit that can easily be adapted to include all elementary grade students. This unit is an oral history project focused on the topic of regional expression of prejudice. Classes in the north and south exchange oral histories of older people. Results are tabulated charts for comparison.

91.02.01 History through Fashion
Although written for middle school foreign language students, middle and upper elementary students (grades 3-5) would profit by this unit. Fashion and art are used to make the study of France more interesting.

91.02.04 Family Life Among the Asauti of West Africa
Although written for high school students, middle and upper elementary students would enjoy the study of the Ashanti culture. The unit focuses on family customs among the Ashanti, a tribal group living in Ghana, near the West African coast. Interesting cultural beliefs and practices lend themselves to role-playing situations in the classroom.

91.02.07 The Inuit Family: A Study of its History, Beliefs, and Images
This unit is easily adaptable for any elementary grade level student. The unit is designed to understand the Inuit (Eskimo), their belief system, and activities related to the Inuit Culture. Lesson plans contain many interesting hands-on activities.

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National Parks

90.03.01 The Wilderness Concept - our National Parks, History and Issues
The unit centers on environmental issues, suitable for high school students. This is of interest to elementary teachers and students would part three, which deals with urban park areas accessible to our students. Here, an examination of issues and problems, which urban park areas face, is given. From this section, many ecological as well as management questions can be raised.

90.03.02 Outdoor Museums: History and Parks
The underlying purpose of this unit is to provide students with an awareness of our National Parks, and how they exist and reflect American values regarding resources, unique landscapes and our history. Woven into the prose are interesting myths, including stories and lots of information about sleeping Giant State Park. The unit is adaptable for all grade levels, K-5.

90.03.04 The Ingredients Needed for a Musical National Park
Adaptable for upper elementary students, (grade 5), the unit's major focus is the National Parks System and how it should go about selecting a musical unit. There is also a great deal of information on the correlation of music, geography, and social studies.

90.03.06 Introducing Children to National Parks
The unit is adaptable for middle and upper elementary students, and introduces students to the United States National Park System. The unit shows historical and chronological views of the creation of National parks with the use of videos and National Park Handbooks.

90.03.07 Presidents in the Parks
This unit contains descriptions of national parks, memorials, monuments, and sites dedicated to those Presidents who made significant contributions to United States of America. The unit contains a wealth of information describing the Presidents' accomplishments while they held office. The unit is adaptable for all grade levels, K-5.

90.03.10 Regionalism as Seen through the National Parks
This unit was written to introduce 5th grade students to the National Park System while studying the regions of the United States. Specific parks are discussed and related to the history, geography, or culture of that region. Parts can be easily adaptable for all grade levels. The unit contains a nice list of National Parks and their addresses.

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Native American Studies

80.02.02 The Native American: Through the Eyes of His Mask with a Special Focus on the Indians of Connecticut
This unit could easily fit with a study of Connecticut's history. It investigates Connecticut Indian artifacts, as well as the masks of the Northwest Coast and Iroquois Indians. Contains hands-on activities. There is emphasis on mask making. Best suited for grades 3-5.

89.05.05 A Different Approach for a Special Child
This unit gives a beautiful overview of the early Indians of Puerto Rico and United States. Customs and life styles are contrasted and analyzed as students participate in discussions, reading, and writing. Lesson plans contain an abundance of work sheets and activities suitable for students in all elementary grade levels, K-5.

90.03.08 The Four Corners Region of the United States Cultures, Ruins and Landmarks
Easily adaptable for all grade levels, this unit centers on the states of Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona. Ways of the Indian cultures and their ruins are discussed, along with the history of each state. The following landmarks are also discussed: Chaco Canyon, National Monument, Mesa Verde, Canyon de Chelly National Monument, and Monument Valley.

91.01.01 Between Aztlaw and Quivira: Europeans and Indians in the Southwestern Untied States
Although written primarily for middle school Spanish students, middle and upper elementary students would profit by this interesting study. The unit centers on the people who first inhabited this land, prehistoric Indians ad their descendents, and on the endurance of Indian culture through the successive waves of invasion. Concluding activities involve journal entries of comparisons and reactions from the unit.

91.04.01 Finding New Voices: Native American Poets
Although many parts of this unit are too difficult for elementary students, the medicine wheel would be of interest to elementary children. An object from the earth such as stone, a flower, a feather, etc. is put in the center. Students are instructed to write a phrase or a sentence about their relationship to the object and read it in class. The unit contains a lot of information about Native Americans.

96.03.01 Willie Sunday: A Critical Analysis of Factual Information in Film
With a classroom puppet leading the way, this unit uses two films, Pocahontas and Little Red Riding Hood, to help young children approach film and literature with a critical eye. A more accurate picture of Pocahontas, of Native Americans in general, and of the nature of wolves is achieved through a variety of pupil involving activities stressing drama. Designed for first grade, but elements could apply to any elementary grade.

96.03.06 Pocahontas: From Fiction to Fact: Using Disney's Film to Teach the True Story
Designed for a fifth grade classroom, this unit relates closely to the study of United States history with primary emphasis on Pocahontas and the Powhatan. Uses film and written material to develop goals. Information clearly presented. Portions could be adapted to both higher and lower grades. Relates well to study of United States History.

98.03.08 The Environmental Adaption of the Native American Indian
Written for grade 4-12, this unit can be adapted for grades K-5. The unit teaches how the environment was central to the Native Americans for all their needs and inspiration. The unit gives background information for the students and then detailed lesson plans on creating artifacts such as masks, wampum beads, Kachina Dolls, dioramas, etc.

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New Haven

78.02.06 Italians and Blacks in New Haven: The Establishment of Two Ethnic Communities
This six to eight week unit was designed to introduce high school students to the history of blacks and Italians in New Haven. Students learn how and why separate institutions were formed, and will understand the relationship of each group to the larger community. Parts could be adapted into the middle and upper elementary curriculum, grades 3-5.

79.03.01 The Development of Westville
The underlying purpose of this unit is to provide students with an awareness of the Westville section of New Haven, Connecticut. Although current information is provided, the focus of the unit is on the historic aspects of Westville. A great teacher resource, this unit is adaptable to most grade levels; specifically grades 2-5.

79.03.04 New Haven’s Hill Neighborhood
This is an activity filled unit that involves students in the historical process at a personal level. Students are encouraged to become more acquainted with various locations in the Hill section of New Haven, Connecticut. This unit allows for the development and practice of map-reading skills. This unit can be adapted for grades 4 and 5.

80.02.04 New Haven: Its Ships and Its Trades, 1800-1920
Though designed for high school, this unit contains some material that might be adapted to an elementary grade study of New Haven.

81.01.03 A Method of Teaching Inner-City Youths to Produce Urban Literature
The unit attempts to help high school students develop an historical appreciation for the city and New Haven in particular through the use of poetry and literature. Beautiful background information for the teacher about U.S. cities in general and New Haven in particular. Could be adapted for middle and upper elementary students, 3-5.

81.01.04 The City and the Family
Written for high school students about the history of the city and New Haven in particular. Could be adapted for all elementary grade levels. The unit has an interesting activity - preparing an oral biography of the student's family.

84.06.09 The Life and Times of the West River 1776 - 1896: A Study of Early Industry in Westville
The unit presents an interesting history of the West River System of Westville. The overall purpose is to develop in the student the ability to make observations and draw conclusions from available evidence. The lesson plans at the end of the unit are designed to develop these skills and can be adapted to the middle and upper elementary grades, 3-5.

84.06.10 Gateway to New Haven: The New Haven Harbor
The geographical location of the New Haven Harbor and how it has affected the lives of the people both past and present is the main emphasis of this unit. The unit contains good resource material about areas surrounding the New Haven Harbor. The unit is easily adaptable for upper elementary students, grade 5.

85.05.04 Against the Tide: Three Who Made It!
By examining the successes of New Haven natives, this unit provides students with a picture of African American life in New Haven, Connecticut during the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s. Constance Baker Motley, Adam Clayton Powell and Raymond St. Jacques are highlighted in this unit. Recommended as a resource for teachers in grades 4 and 5.

89.01.01 Integrating the Hispanic Youth Population of the Hill into the New Haven Community
This unit presents an interesting picture of the New Haven Hispanics and their contributions to the community, the Hill area of New Haven. Although the unit designates one area of New Haven, concepts and activities surrounding the community can be used and adapted to include other communities of New Haven. The unit could be adapted for middle and upper elementary students, 3-5.

89.01.02 American Studies, "The Hill Community"
The Hill area of New Haven is the main focus of this unit, and how it was selected as a Model Cities area. Emphasis is placed upon what a community is, how a community functions, and what causes it to grow or remain stagnant. Although designed for middle and high school students, parts of this unit could be adapted for upper elementary students, grade 5.

89.01.03 The Community and You: Learning Your Way Around Fair Haven
The unit emphasizes historical development and change in the Fair Haven community. Topics include: the role of oystering, the influx of immigrants, and industrial growth. The unit contains background information for the teacher and can easily be adapted for middle and upper elementary students, grades 3-5.

89.01.07 A Conceptual Model for Teaching Community Development
History and geography comprise the main components of this unit while examining local communities. The student is taken step by step though the major aspects of their community. An interesting suggestion is taking students on a bus tour of their local community. Can be adapted for all elementary grade levels, K-5.

89.01.10 Communities in Transition
Newhallville is the central focus for the study of community in this unit. It combines personal research and interviews to gain an understanding of the historical development of the community. Information could be used in developing lessons and activities for upper elementary students, grade 5.

89.01.11 Urban New Haven in the Making
The unit provides information about the historical background, physical structure, organizations, businesses, and individual contributions of the Dixwell community. The unit contains important background information for the teacher about the Dixwell community, and could be used as a model for gathering information for upper elementary students about their own community.

89.01.12 Cultural Communities of New Haven
This unit is designed primarily for grades 2-3, but can be adapted for all elementary grade levels, K-5. The unit covers several ethnic groups who contributed to the growth of New Haven. Various ethnic groups are studied along with activities for each month of the school calendar.

89.01.14 Newhallville: A Neighborhood of Changing Prosperity
This unit explores the history of New Haven with emphasis placed on its effect of the Newhallville neighborhood. The lessons center on the carriage industry and on the firearms industry to discuss the prosperity of the city and neighborhood. Could be adapted for upper elementary students, grades 4-5.

91.01.06 Minority Families Moved from the South to the North for Economic Growth
This unit can be adapted to include upper elementary students, (grade 5). The highlight of the unit is the Winchester Repeating Arms Factory, which was started in 1778 by Eli Whitney who manufactured more effective firearms. The lesson plans contain many activities, using work sheets, writing, and oral reporting.

91.02.08 New Haven Families: Artifacts and Attitudes, 1770s to 1890s
The unit adaptable for any elementary grade level gives students direct experience with their city's cultural past. The unit requires about 12 weeks and encourages frequent trips to study community resources listed in the text.

92.03.03 A New Look at Old New Haven
Connecticut Colonial history is discussed in this unit. The concentration of information relates to New Haven history. This unit is easily adapted to the Social Studies curricula of grades 3, 4, and 5.

92.03.05 My City, My Home: Good Neighborhoods are Essential to a Better City
This unit discusses the urban life of New Haven, Connecticut. It provides information pertinent to the study of communities, citizenship and urban improvement. It is recommended as a resource for grades K-3 and adaptable for use in grades 4-5.

92.03.08 Examining the African American Role in Hew Haven History: Pride in the Past—Hope for the Future
This is an excellent unit written for students in grades 3-5. The unit discusses African American history as it applies to New Haven history. It can be used as a resource or as a complete unit in the upper elementary grades.

97.04.01 The City of New Haven
In this unit, as students learn about New Haven and its history, they learn about their own family. Integrated approach. Relates well to Social development curriculum. Recommended for grades 4-5.

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Social Development

80.06.01 The World War II Holocaust
Though designed for older students, this unit on the Holocaust contains considerable information that could be adapted to help upper elementary students understand both the period and the nature of prejudice. Could be used when studying United States history. Recommended for grades 4-5.

81.03.05 Teenage Boys: Perspectives on the Adolescent Male's Development in an Urban Setting
Although written for middle and high school teenagers, the unit gives excellent background information for upper elementary teachers, (grade 5), about issues confronting adolescent boys in today's urban environment. The unit is divided into four sections: Identity-self image; Moral Dilemmas; Adolescent Sexuality, and Teenage Fatherhood.

82.06.08 Impact of a Handicapped Child on the Family
This unit focuses on disabled children and the effect they have on their families. Handicaps and disabilities are discussed as length. The life of a family with a disabled child is also discussed. This unit is a good resource for lessons on the handicapped and disabled and can be adapted to grades K-5.

84.05.03 Television and Teens
This unit examines some of the viewing habits of Americans, and then suggests ways to help students cut back on their viewing time. In addition, the unit looks at ways in which students can utilize TV to their advantage. Teachers in middle and upper elementary grades, 3-5, can easily adapt the lessons and activities by using current TV shows, commercials, etc.

84.05.06 Identity: A Path to Self-Esteem
This unit seeks to raise self-esteem in students. Many of the activities related to the lesson plans can easily be adapted into the elementary school’s social curriculum, "Project Charlie."

84.05.07 Anger, Aggression and Adolescents
The goal of this unit is to help students be competent and assertive, not hostile and aggressive. Ideas are presented for helping students cope with their aggressive feelings with decision-making strategies. There are great ideas for middle/upper elementary students, 3-5.

84.05.08 A Middle School Orientation Program for Parents, Students, and Teachers
This unit is specifically designed for the middle school student. However, activities listed for parents such as helping students limit TV to having dinner or breakfast together can be adapted for any grade level, K-5. There are beautiful ideas for a parent orientation package at the beginning of the school term.

87.05.08 Culture in Relationship to the Mind
Various themes discussed in this unit are: 1) Moral Values; 2) Family and School; 3) the Brain; 4) Intellect and Memory; 5) Giftedness, and; 6) Technology and Art. Parts of this unit could be extracted for upper elementary classrooms, grade 5. The unit contains great working vocabulary and many activities given along with detailed lesson plans.

88.02.04 Ethnic Humor
Ethnic humor is the focus of a study of ethnicity and its implications on how we view ourselves and how we view each other. This unit discusses topics such as diversity, stereotypes, and immigration trends. The activities included in this unit emphasize analysis, creative writing, critical thinking, and reading. Recommended as a resource for teachers in grades 4 and 5.

88.05.02 Talking with Kids about Sex and AIDS
This unit discusses in detail the mental and physical health issues associated with adolescents suffering from AIDS and HIV. Although this unit can be characterized as a health unit it approaches the topic of AIDS and HIV with a more social awareness than scientific perspective. Recommended for grades 3 through 5 for background information.

89.02.02 A Special Education Curriculum Unit Dealing with Death, Depression and Suicide Using Poetry
This unit is written for children in grades 3-12 with the main emphasis being on depression and death. Children read poems to learn the signs of depression and suicide to help themselves identify feelings they may have.

89.05.09 Images of the American Family
This unit covers all four marking periods of the school year with goals, objectives and activities to be covered during each one. The unit examines the American family during the 19th and 20th centuries. Activities include making a family tree, conducting interviews for oral reports, poetry writing, book reports, etc. Activities could easily be adapted for middle and upper elementary students.

90.02.03 We Are One
This unit helps to build esteem by centering on problem solving for life skills, and building trust within individuals and in a group setting. The unit contains many activities that could integrate in to any elementary "Project Charlie" lesson.

90.04.01 Changing Images of the American Family in Literature and Media: 1945-1990
The unit makes use of television, literature, film and slides of paintings to reconstruct moments when the family has changed in our American culture. Not only does the unit show how families have changed, but similarities as well. The unit is suitable for middle and upper elementary grades, 3-5.

90.04.02 Depicting Family Life: Changes and Modifications
This unit is adaptable for upper elementary students. The years 1945 to 1990 are studied through political, scientific, and technological events. Novels are read reflecting the changes in family life as a result of these occurrences. The lesson plans contain an abundance of work sheets and activities related to the subject matter.

90.04.04 A Different Approach for a Special Child: Part Two
Although written for the Spanish-speaking child, this unit can be adapted for any elementary grade level, K-5. The unit discusses why families move from one country to another looking for better living conditions, how they adapt parts of the new culture, and how families and countries go through changes over time. The lesson plans contain an abundance of activities centered on the subject matter.

90.04.08 The Changing Family: How Changes in the Family Reflects Social and Economic changes in Society
Students of this unit study the history of the American family from the time of the Native Americans to present. They examine American society when its inhabitants were hunters and gatherers, then farmers, and lastly, wage earners in an industrial/urban society. The unit is adaptable for upper elementary students.

90.04.10 Highlights of Modern American Family Art and Literature
This unit adaptable for upper elementary students, (grade 5), discusses Grassroots Artists and the Social Realists Movement. The unit teaches students that family structure can vary from region to region in different decades.

90.05.01 Cultural Diversity: the American Family - Past, Present, and Future
This unit looks at the American histories of six different ethnic groups: Black, Hispanic, White, Japanese, Chinese, and Native Americans. The unit examines the changing American family through a series of short reading selections. Activities suggested with lesson plans are easily adaptable for all elementary students.

92.01.05 Getting to Know Your Classmates with Special Needs
This unit discusses handicapped children in the realm of family life and in the realm of the classroom. It can be a resource for social development curriculum in grades 4 and 5.

96.03.03 Beauty is More Than Skin Deep: Examining the Positive and Negative Depiction of Physical Appearance in Children's Films
This unit uses a variety of popular children's films to develop a more thoughtful approach toward defining beauty, as opposed to the stereotypes often presented in film. Uses multicultural literature to reinforce basic theme. Elements could be used with most elementary students. Interdisciplinary approach.

97.02.12 American Children's Literature: A Bibliotheraputic Approach
This unit presents suggested readings and related activities for various grade levels, designed to help children deal with problems that occur in their lives. Interdisciplinary approach. Suitable for grades K-5.

97.04.02 Strategies for Teaching the Value of Diversity
In this unit, students move from looking at themselves and their family to examining prejudice and discrimination. Integrated approach. Could be used to develop an understanding of diversity. Suitable for grades K-5.

97.04.05 Planning for Student Diversity When Teaching about Puberty
This unit helps teachers to consider the diversity in pupil development and background that should be considered when teaching about puberty. It is suitable for grades 4-5.

97.04.09 My Self -and No Other
This unit allows students to examine themselves, discover their strong points, and recognize areas in need of improvement. Interdisciplinary approach. Suitable for grades K-5.

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U. S. History

78.03.03 Prohibition as a Reform
Designed for high school students, this unit could be adapted for middle and upper elementary students, grades 3-5. Contains excellent background information on the prohibition movement with special emphasis on colonial days. Beautiful lesson plans including games, movies, debates, drama, etc.

78.03.06 America's Wars, 1898-1945
Designed for 11th grade history students, parts could be adapted for upper elementary students, grade 5. The unit focuses on three wars between 1898 and 1945, the Spanish-American War, World War I, and World War II. Provides an interesting lesson on New Haven and the nation preparing for protection and production.

78.04.02 History of Connecticut
This unit presents a beautiful picture about the history of Connecticut. Areas of study include the geology of Connecticut, the Indians of Connecticut and the people of Connecticut. Great resource for teachers and can be easily adapted for all elementary grade levels, K-5.

78.04.03 The Architecture of New England and the Southern Colonies as it Reflects the Changes in Colonial Life
Provides excellent resource material for the elementary teacher that can be used when planning a unit about the history of New England, particularly Connecticut.

79.03.03 Discover Eli Whitney
The biography of Eli Whitney is the main thrust of this unit. The inventor and his inventions are connected to many local events, places and resources. The recommended grade levels for this unit are grades 4 and 5.

81.02.06 The Industrial Revolution
Good overview of the Industrial Revolution. Material could be adapted for middle/upper elementary students, grades 3-5. A "study set" consisting of maps, drawings and other resources are available at the Institute office to supplement this unit.

81.02.07 World War II: A Comparative Study through Literature
Written for 11th and 12th grade English students. Although too advanced for elementary students, the narrative presents excellent background information on World War II.

81.04.02 Reading and Writing About the Civil War
Parts of the unit could easily be adapted for middle and upper elementary grade students (grades 3-5) with the assistance of the library medial specialist for help with the research. One part suggests that students choose a person from the Civil War era and write a biography. Students write five questions they feel comfortable with regarding their Civil War person. Each student answers the questions and is interviewed by classmates.

82.02.03 My Place in Time
The main thrust of this unit is the biography of Benjamin Franklin. The information contained in this unit offers the necessary background information for an educated discussion of Benjamin Franklin in a grade 4 or a grade 5 classroom. Techniques for writing biographies are also mentioned.

82.03.01 When Military Necessity Overrides Constitutional Guarantees: The Treatment of Japanese-Americans during World War II
This unit is designed to evaluate the history of Japan and the events that shaped Japanese-American relations during and after World War II. Specific information leading up to Pearl Harbor is included. The main thrusts of this unit are research skills and developing reports. Recommended for grades 4 and 5.

87.02.01 Willa Cather's My Antonia: "The Happiness and the Curse"
Could be adapted for advanced upper elementary students (grade 5) in connection with a unit on immigration and the westward expansion. Emphasizes conditions of life on the rural Nebraska prairie land of late nineteenth century America. Contains excellent ideas for creative writing.

87.02.08 War Beyond Romance: The Red Badge of Courage and Other Considerations
The unit seeks to investigate the nature of war, and man in war. It is two-part in structure. The first part does research concerning the motivations behind warfare. The second part uses Stephen Crane's The Red Badge of Courage and a critical examination of its main ideas and characters. Could be adapted for advanced upper elementary students, grade 5.

87.03.06 The Humor of America
This unit traces, chronologically, what Americans in particular have found humorous, so students maybe aware of what we considered to be funny historically and how it relates to what we consider funny now. Although most of the unit is based upon literature that is too advanced, parts can be extracted (e.g. Davy Crockett tales for all grade levels.)

87.04.01 At Home: The Ties that Bind
Has great material depicting life at home during World War II. Middle to upper elementary students (grades 3-5) would profit by the unit. Although the literature is too advanced for elementary students, portions could be read to the students, helping to give an overall picture of this time frame.

87.04.02 Reading Laura Ingalls Wilder: A Journey of Discovery
This unit can be adapted for both lower and upper elementary children, grades K-5. Unit gives a clear picture of pioneer life on the prairie. Lesson plans include role-playing, writing, and discussion questions.

87.04.06 Three Literary Views of the American Frontier
Children learn about early frontier living through three novels, Shane, Caddie Woodlawn, and The Trees. Parts can be adapted for middle and upper elementary students, grades 3-5. Role-playing is used where students are divided into two groups, homesteaders and cattlemen. Each group works together to formulate a list of reasons why they have a right to the land.

87.06.05 A Stitch in Time
Has great hands-on lessons for the introduction of weaving. Could be adapted for middle/upper elementary students, 3-5, along with units about Native Americans or early pioneers. Take home lessons could involve parents for lower elementary students, 1-2.

89.05.02 Stepping Into a Colonial Family, a Primary Student's Perspective of Colonial Crafts, Customs and Traditions
This unit designed for students in grades 2-5 focuses on colonial education, the colonial homestead, colonial craftsmen and their crafts. The unit offers teachers a series of classroom activities that reflect the colonial life style.

90.05.04 American Life: A Comparison of Colonial Life to Today's Life
Although designed for grade one, the abundance of beautiful activities can easily be adapted for all elementary grade levels. The unit focuses on two areas to use as comparisons - the Pilgrims’ life, and life in colonial Connecticut. The unit is basically a visual and hands-on unit.

90.07.03 Mankind's Fascination with Flight
This interesting unit can be adapted for all elementary grade levels. The unit focuses on the Wright brothers, and their significant contributions to society. Objectives include the early history of flight; the science and inspiration of flight; and the achievements of the Wright brothers.

91.01.04 The Victorian Age: A People in Search of Themselves as Seen through Their architecture
Upper elementary students would profit by this unit and find it interesting. Of special interest of students would be the slide presentation of buildings showing Victorian architecture and the accompanying walking tour to see the actual buildings. Students can learn to develop an understanding of how architecture reflects the hopes and dreams of the people who lived in the area.

91.02.05 Buildings of America
This unit is adaptable for middle and upper elementary grade students. Students study buildings from different regions and different historical periods. They learn how climate, natural resources and culture have affected the design of these buildings.

91.02.09 Changing Images of Childhood in America: Colonial, Federal and Modern England
This unit uses art activities to study colonial New Haven and its surrounding areas. Children participate in a wide variety of craft projects related to colonial days. The unit would be of interest to all elementary students, K-5.

92.02.01 The Indians’ Discovery of Columbus
This unit discusses Christopher Columbus and his relationship to Native Americans. It is a good resource for all grades, but is adaptable to grades K–5.

92.02.02 French Creole in Louisiana: An American Tale
A source of information on the Creole culture in Louisiana, this unit offers information for teachers in grades K–5. The lessons and activities are good resources.

92.02.07 Windows of Time Since 1492
This unit provides information regarding the earliest historical events of the modern-day United States. The discussion of Christopher Columbus provides ample background information for all teachers. The unit is recommended for grades three through five.

92.04.01 Researching Columbus: Encounters and Exchanges
Christopher Columbus is the central topic of this unit. Students in grades K–5, can use the information and lessons. The bibliography is useful.

96.03.07 The Eye Behind the Camera: The Voice Behind the Story Images of Slavery-Fact, Fiction, and Myth
Designed for grades 6-8, this unit examines Hollywood’s treatment of the slavery era. Both stereotypical and more positive films are presented. Literature and story telling also play an important role. Activities could be adapted to elementary grades 3-5, with perhaps some going lower.

96.03.04 Using Film as a Springboard to Explore the Truth about AIDS
Designed for a third grade, the interdisciplinary unit uses film and written, material to present a more accurate picture of HIV and AIDS. Activities aim to dispel many of the stereotypes regarding this disease and its victims. It is easily suitable for elementary grades 3-5.

96.03.10 Representation in Art and Film: Identity and Stereotype
Designed for a 7-12 grade art class, this unit uses a variety of media and approaches, including visual art, literature, video, writing, and discussion to help students develop a deepening awareness of identity and stereotype. Though it might be a stretch to adapt most material to an elementary class, the Aunt Jamima and "Crooklyn" sections offer possibilities.

96.03.11 Mosaic America on Film: Fact Versus Fiction
Through the use of film, this unit examines how minorities, ethnic groups, and history are portrayed in film. Encourages use of computers. Designed for grades 7-12. A creative elementary teacher could adapt some material, especially that which refers to Pocahontas.

97.02.02 Literature of the Civil War
This unit attempts to better understand the people and events of the Civil War through the use of children's literature. Integrated approach. It is suitable for grades 4-5.

97.02.03 World War II as Seen through Children's Literature
This unit uses literature and film to help students understand World War II. Integrated approach. It is suitable for grade 5.

97.02.04 Using Children's Literature to Understand Working Women and Children during World War II
This unit uses literature and film to help students understand World War II. There is emphasis on women and children. Interdisciplinary approach. Suitable for grades K-5.

97.03.04 Keeping the Home Fires: The Lives of Western Women
This unit focuses on Western Expansion in the United States with an emphasis on the role played by women. Interdisciplinary approach. It is suitable for grades 3-5.

97.03.05 All American Girl
This unit uses the American Girl series, Dear America, and American Diaries to help students understand the role of women during the Colonial, Revolutionary, and Civil war periods. It is suitable for grades 4-5.

97.03.08 Common Threads Weaved Together the Lives of Civil War Women
Through an integrated approach, this unit illuminates the strength and dedication of women during the Civil War. It is suitable for grades 3-5.

97.03.09 American Girls through Times and Trial
This unit uses books depicting three different women living in three different historical settings to allow students to learn both about the historical period and the role and struggles of women during that particular period. Integrated approach. The unit is suitable for grades 3-5.

98.01.02 Women Portrayed in Film
This unit written for students in grades 1-3 can easily be adapted for grades 5 and 6 as well. The unit is a study about women and their contribution to history, and about using film and books to help students lean productively. Three American women are used in the study: Harriet Tubman, Annie Oakley, and Wilma Rudolph. The unit provides great background information on the three women and excellent activities.

98.01.04 Mr. Friday and Friends: A Prospectus of Early Pioneer Life through Film
Mr. Friday is a puppet that assists in bringing information pertinent to stories that the children are viewing in class. He guides the children in their critical analysis of historical facts in film by asking relevant questions about the stories. Children in all grade levels K-5 would enjoy gathering historical information about early pioneer life. Films such as Daniel Boone, Davy Crockett, and Johnny Appleseed are used in the unit.

98.01.10 Teaching Music through its Relationship to History with the Use of Film, Video and the Specious Present
This unit can be used in grades K-5. The unit uses the concept of "Specious Present" to bind all disciplines together in its development for having students gain an understanding of different time periods and how our personal views and opinions can either obscure or provide insight as to understanding ones past.

98.04.04 The Great Depression and the New Deal
There is excellent background information about the Great Depression and President Herbert Hoover. Although written for grade 8, can be adapted for grade 5. Includes a field trip to the New York Stock Market and the United Nations.

98.04.05 Who Gets to Invent and How Do Inventors Change Our Lives
Interdisciplinary in approach, this unit was written for grades 2-6. The unit emphasizes the positive and negative effects of innovations. The study encourages students to become problem-solvers and come up with solutions for everyday dilemmas.

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