Tickets for Yale Climate & Energy Institute : YCEI Conference

Fourth Annual YCEI Conference
Water: The Looming Crises

April 5, 2013
8:30am – 6:00pm

Burke Auditorium, Kroon Hall
195 Prospect Street, New Haven, CT

Featured Presentations
& Panel Discussions

on the effects of climate change on
global hydrology and how industry and
government are planning for all aspects
of water in a warmer world.

MORNING SESSION:
Climate Change and
Extreme Water Events

Hurricanes and Storms in a Warmer World

Can We Constrain Future Hydrologic Changes by Looking to the Past?

Anticipating & Adapting to Water Extremes Today

AFTERNOON SESSION:
Climate Change and
the Future of Water

Peak Water Solutions in a Changing Climate

Social Impacts of Changing Water Patterns

Planning for the Future of Water

Organizing to Combat the Global Water Crisis

Focus of this Year’s YCEI Conference

Public discussions of global warming usually focus on greenhouse gases and rising temperatures. But the most severe and looming impacts of climate change will likely come from shifts of regional and global water patterns. Hurricanes Sandy and Katrina revealed that coastal cities are poorly prepared for sustained increases in storm intensity and sea level; the current wave of mega-droughts is testing modern agricultural practices and crops.

Weathering these changes demands public and private commitment to both adaptation and mitigation, along with international cooperation. Understanding the future of Earth's water requires much more accurate climate forecasts than today; coping with large shifts of water patterns needs major advances in civil engineering and agricultural technology. Public officials will have to develop and invest in far-reaching strategies, as strained water resources press against food supplies and national security.

Water: The Looming Crises will focus on the science of Earth's hydrologic cycle and on the steps industry, government and NGOs are taking to deal with all aspects of water in a warmer world.

Full Agenda Schedule & Speaker Topics

Thursday, April 4, 2013 | Leitner Observatory at Yale University

4:00 pm Student Sessions

5:30 pm Reception & Dinner (by invitation only)
dinner keynote
The Global Challenges of Water and Energy
William DiCroce
President and CEO, Veolia Energy North America

Friday, April 5, 2013 | Burke Auditorium, Kroon Hall

Climate Change and Extreme Water Events

9:00 am Welcome and Introduction

9:15 am Hurricanes and Storms in a Warmer World
Kerry Emanuel
Dept. of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, MIT

9:45 am Can We Constrain Future Hydrologic Changes by Looking to the Past?
Gavin Schmidt
NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies

10:15 am BREAK

10:30 am PANEL DISCUSSION:
Anticipating and Adapting to Water Extremes Today
moderator:
Matthew Huber, Purdue Climate Change Research Center
Robert DeConto, Dept. of Geosciences, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Klaus Jacob, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University
Kathleen White, US Army Corps of Engineers

Piet Dircke, Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences

Noon LUNCH

Climate Change and the Future of Water

1:15 pm Peak Water Solutions in a Changing Climate
Peter Gleick, Pacific Institute

2:00 pm The Social Impacts of Changing Water Patterns
Farhana Sultana, Dept. of Geography, Maxwell School of Syracuse University

2:40 pm BREAK

3:00 pm PANEL DISCUSSION:
Planning for the Future of Water
moderator:
David Cassuto, Pace Law School, Pace University
Robert Goldstein, US Military Academy at West Point
Ben Grumbles, US Water Alliance
David Westman, Con Edison
Julie Zimmerman, Yale University

Closing Keynote and Reception

4:45 pm Organizing to Combat the Global Water Crisis
Torgny Holmgren, Stockholm International Water Institute

5:30 pm RECEPTION

Speaker & Panelist Bios & Photos

Speakers & Panelists in order of appearence

Reception & Dinner (invitation only) | Thursday Evening, 4-4-13

William DiCroce
President and CEO, Veolia Energy North America
Veolia Energy Profile

Dinner Keynote
The Global Challenges of Water and Energy

Bill DiCroce is President and Chief Executive Officer of Veolia Energy North America. During his tenure at Veolia, he led efforts to integrate new businesses and improve the efficiency and performance of the company’s energy asset portfolio. Before joining Veolia in 2008, he worked for private utilities owned by NSTAR Electric and Gas Company, as well as for other district energy and telecommunication businesses in the greater Boston area. He began his career in energy as a nuclear power engineer with General Electric at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory, which is associated with the U.S. Naval Nuclear program. Veolia Energy is a division of Veolia Environnement (NYSE: VE), the global leader in water and environmental services.

MORNING SESSION
Climate Change and Extreme Water Events | Friday Morning, 4-5-13

Kerry Emanuel
Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, MIT
EAPS Study
EAPS Profile

Speaker
Hurricanes and Storms in a Warmer World

Kerry Emanuel is Cecil & Ida Green Professor of Atmospheric Science at MIT. His research focuses on various aspects of moist convection in the atmosphere and on tropical cyclones, including the mechanisms that may intensify hurricanes. His group has developed a promising technique for inferring tropical cyclone activity from the coarse output of climate models and has recently published an analysis of the increased threat, with global warming, of storm surge from landfalling hurricanes (Nature Climate Change 2, February 14, 2012, 462–467).

Gavin Schmidt
NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies
NASA Profile

Speaker
Can We Constrain Future Hydrologic Changes
by Looking to the Past?

Gavin Schmidt is a climatologist at NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies. His main research interest lies in understanding the variability of climate, both its internal variability and its response to external forcing. In particular, he has used large-scale general circulation models for the atmosphere and ocean to investigate how variability in external forcings, such as greenhouse gases, relate to intrinsic (unforced) climate variability, such as oscillations in the ocean’s deep circulation that transports heat around the globe. His recent work has focused on ways to compare ancient climate (paleoclimate) data with models. He is co-author, with Joshua Wolfe, of Climate Change: Picturing the Science (2009, W. W. Norton & Company).

Panelists

Matthew Huber
Purdue Climate Change Research Center
Purdue Profile

Moderator
Anticipating and Adapting to Water Extremes Today

Matthew Huber is professor of earth, atmospheric and planetary sciences at Purdue University and director of the Purdue Climate Change Research Center. His research concentrates on understanding, through global climate models, the different episodes of warm, greenhouse climates in the last 90 million years, as a way of quantifying the uncertainty in future climate change. The Purdue Climate Change Research Center is an interdisciplinary effort focusing on research and education in global climate change.

Robert DeConto
Department of Geosciences, University of Massachusetts Amherst
UMass Profile

Panelist
Anticipating and Adapting to Water Extremes Today

Robert DeConto is professor of climatology, paleoclimatology and earth systems modeling in the Department of Geosciences at University of Massachusetts Amherst. He has worked on modeling dramatic climate events in the geologic record, such as the formation of the Antarctic ice sheets 34 million years ago and the global super-warming period that occurred about 20 million years earlier. His research now focuses on predicting the impact future climate change will have on sea level.

Klaus Jacob
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University
Columbia University Profile

Panelist
Anticipating and Adapting to Water Extremes Today

Klaus Jacob is special research scientist at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University and adjunct professor at the Columbia School of International and Public Affairs. His long career has spanned the interface between Earth science and public affairs, from research in basic Earth sciences, such as earthquake seismology and climate change, to disaster planning, risk management, and regulatory policies for infrastructure and urban development.

Kathleen White
US Army Corps of Engineers

Panelist
Anticipating and Adapting to Water Extremes Today

Kate White is senior lead for global and climate change at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Currently a member of the USACE Institute for Water Resources, she has been with the Corps for more than 25 years. Since 2007, she has been active in interagency efforts supporting climate change adaptation for water resources, including the Climate Change and Water Working Group. She is co-author of the foundational USGS document on water management, Climate Change and Water Resources Management: A Federal Perspective.

Piet Dircke
Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences
Rotterdam Profile

Panelist
Anticipating and Adapting to Water Extremes Today

Piet Dircke is Global Knowledge Director for Water Management with ARCADIS. A leading global expert in flood protection and climate adaptation for coastal and delta cities, he is also Professor in Urban Water Management at the Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences. His research for the Centre for Sustainable Solutions at the RDM Campus in Rotterdam focuses on best practices of water management and innovative climate adaptation in delta cities, and on smart, multifunctional urban and coastal flood protection.

AFTERNOON SESSION
Climate Change and the Future of Water | Friday Afternoon, 4-5-13

Peter Gleick
Pacific Institute
Pacific Institute Profile

Speaker
Peak Water Solutions in a Changing Climate

Peter Gleick is co-founder and president of the Pacific Institute. His work and writing has redefined water from the realm of engineers to the world of social justice, sustainability, human rights and integrated thinking. He developed the first analysis of the impact of climate change on water resources, as well as the earliest comprehensive work on water and conflict, and also pioneered the concepts of a soft path for water and of peak water. His work defining basic human needs for water and the human right to water has been used by the UN and in human rights cases. His latest book is A Twenty-First Century U.S. Water Policy (2012, Oxford University Press). He was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2003.

Located in Oakland, California, the Pacific Institute celebrated its 25th anniversary in 2012 as one of the most innovative, independent non-governmental organizations in the fields of water and economic and environmental justice and sustainability.

Farhana Sultana
Department of Geography, Maxwell School of Syracuse University
Maxwell Profile

Speaker
The Social Impacts of Changing Water Patterns

Farhana Sultana is associate professor of geography at The Maxwell School of Syracuse University. She has worked on a wide range of environmental issues around the world in many different roles, including as a programme officer in the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), where she was responsible for a large environmental management program in Bangladesh. Previously she was a MacArthur Fellow and an International Water Management Institute Fellow at the University of Minnesota, a Visiting Fellow at the School of Environment and Development of the University of Manchester and a faculty member at King's College London. She is co-editor of The Right to Water: Politics, Governance and Social Struggles (2012, Routledge).

Panelists

David Cassuto
Pace Law School, Pace University
Pace Law Profile

Moderator
Planning for the Future of Water

David N. Cassuto is professor of law at Pace Law School, Pace University, and director of the Brazil American Institute for Law and Environment. Before joining the faculty at Pace Law School, he practiced civil litigation in San Francisco and served on the Executive Committee of the San Francisco Bar Association’s Environmental Law Practice Group. A former professor of English specializing in literature and the environment, he has published and lectured widely on legal, literary and environmental issues. He is also a frequent speaker on legal and cultural studies. He is the author and editor of several books, including Dripping Dry: Literature, Politics and Water in the Desert Southwest (2001, University of Michigan Press).

Robert Goldstein
US Military Academy at West Point
USMA Profile

Panelist
Planning for the Future of Water

Robert J. Goldstein is the Director of the West Point Center for the Rule of Law and holds the Association of Graduate’s endowed Chair in Constitutional and Military Law at the United States Military Academy at West Point. He has also served as director of the environmental programs at Pace Law School and as general counsel for Riverkeeper, Inc., where he led a team of investigators, policy analysts, and attorneys, whose mission was to safeguard the ecological integrity of the Hudson River.

Ben Grumbles
US Water Alliance
US Water Alliance Profile

Panelist
Planning for the Future of Water

Ben Grumbles is president of the U.S. Water Alliance, a not-for-profit educational organization committed to uniting people and policies for water sustainability throughout the United States. He has a long career in water and environmental policy, including with the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality and U.S. EPA, where he was assistant administrator from 2004 through 2008.

David Westman
Con Edison
LinkedIn Profile

Panelist
Planning for the Future of Water

Dave Westman is a regulatory manager for climate change and sustainability at Con Edison, the utility company providing services to New York City and Westchester County. He focuses on energy efficiency, climate change, and climate adaptation policies that affect the utility business and has been active in numerous public and private initiatives addressing climate adaptation in the energy sector. Since 2008 he has been one of the original participants in the Mayor’s New York City Climate Adaptation Task Force.

Julie Zimmerman
Department of Chemical & Environmental Engineering and School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Yale University
Yale Profile

Panelist
Planning for the Future of Water

Julie Zimmerman is associate professor in the Department of Chemical & Environmental Engineering and the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies at Yale University. Her research focuses on the application of green chemistry and green engineering principles to innovative design of products, processes and systems. This work encompasses the choice of benign alternative chemicals and materials, as well as the design of policy and analysis for sustainability—especially in areas related to corporate environmental behavior, water use, and water treatment technologies for developing communities. She received the 2012 Walter L. Huber Civil Engineering Research Prize from the American Society of Civil Engineering.

Closing Keynote and Reception

Torgny Holmgren
Stockholm International Water Institute
SIWI Profile

Closing Keynote
Organizing to Combat the Global Water Crisis

Torgny Holmgren is executive director of the Stockholm International Water Institute, a policy institute that generates knowledge and informs decision-making towards water wise policy and sustainable development. Before joining SIWI, he was Ambassador at the Swedish Ministry for Foreign Affairs and Head of the Department for Development Policy, where he was responsible for policies on global sustainable development. He also recently served as Sherpa for the UN Secretary-General's High Level Panel on Global Sustainability. An economist by training, he served at the Board of Directors and the Research Department of the World Bank (Washington, DC), and managed and edited the book Aid and Reform in Africa (2001, The World Bank).

Conference Location & Directions

Burke Auditorium, Kroon Hall
The main conference will be held in the Burke Auditorium of Kroon Hall at 195 Prospect Street, New Haven, Connecticut.

Click here for Yale campus map.

The Leitner Family Observatory

The opening reception and dinner will be held at the observatory located at 355 Prospect Street.

Click here for Yale campus map.

Directions to Kroon Hall (The Leitner Family Observatory is up the street)

From I-91 South

  • Leave I-91 South at Exit 3 for Trumbull St.
  • Follow the directions at right to Kroon Hall.

From I-95 North

  • Leave I-95 North at Exit 48 (left exit) to merge onto I-91 North towards Hartford.
  • Take Exit 3 for Trumbull St. Follow the directions at right to Kroon Hall.

From I-95 South

  • Leave I-95 South at Exit 48 for I-91 North towards Hartford.
  • Take Exit 3 for Trumbull St. Follow the directions at right to Kroon Hall.
Leitner link Kroon link