Research Teams
 

Traumatic Psychosis: Worldwide Network of Researchers

GERMANY
USA
FRANCE
FRANCE
USA
 
GERMANY
USA
SWEDEN
USA
ISRAEL
 
USA
GERMANY
ISRAEL
AUSTRALIA
NORWAY
 
USA
GERMANY
USA
USA
USA/ISRAEL
 
NETHERLANDS
NETHERLANDS
     
     
     
 

Name: Daniel Dayan

Country: France

Biography:

born in 1943, Dayan is a Fellow at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique in Paris, and a Professor of Media Sociology at the Institut d'Etudes Politiques de Paris. Professor Dayan's main fields of research are film theory and media sociology. He studied at Stanford and in Paris, and has taught at Stanford, in Jerusalem, Los Angeles, and Oslo. He is a member of the American Film Institute and participates in the European Science Foundation program "Changing Media, Changing Europe." Selected publications include "The Tutor-Code of Classical Cinema" (1974); Western graffiti: Jeux d'images et programmation du spectateur dans "La Chevauchèe fantastique" de John Ford(1983); Media Events: The Live Broadcasting of History (1992); La télévision cérémonielle: Anthropologie et histoire en direct (1996); À chacun son 11 septembre? (2002).

Name: Francoise Davoine & Jean-Max Gaudilliere

Country: France

Biography:

In the course of nearly thirty years of work with patients in psychiatric hospitals and private practice, Francoise Davoine and Jean-Max Gaudilliere have uncovered the ways in which transference and countertransference are affected by the experience of social catastrophe. Handed down from one generation to the next, the unspoken horrors of war, betrayal, dissociation, and disaster in the families of patient and analyst alike are not only revived in the therapeutic relationship but, when understood, actually provide the keys to the healing process. The authors present vivid examples of clinical work with severely traumatized patients, reaching inward to their own intimate family histories as shaped by the Second World War and outward toward an exceptionally broad range of cultural references to literature, philosophy, political theory, and anthropology.

Role in the Study:

Francoise and Jean-Max’s involvement in the project will be issued from their research on “madness and the social link”, pursued during 30 years in the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris, The Center for the Study of Social Movements, and in clinical practice both in public mental hospitals and in private practice, for instance with descendants of holocaust survivors and survivors of totalitarian systems. They consider: 1.-- that the transmission of “the tear in the social link “ through generations after cataclysmic events, if approached through the perspective of its possible healing and mending, as a symptom does not obey a causality and determinist model, but provides a dynamic process of investigation where the psychotic symptoms are targeting an exploration of areas out of reach of usual logical and cognitive means. Also they are convinced by their experience and other analysts’ in supervision:2.-- that this investigation bears positive outcomes only when the analyst, as a co-researcher, is involved in the process by being activated through analogous zones from the common lot of cataclysmic histories which happened on his side along the historical line. 3-- that the scientific model imposed by transference in their clinical practice asks therefore the question of the implication of the observer in the current research.

 

Name: Dori Laub M.D.

Country: United States

Biography:

Dori Laub, M.D. is a Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the Yale University School of Medicine and a psychoanalyst in private practice in New Haven, Connecticut, who works primarily with victims of massive psychic trauma and their children. In 1979 he was the co-founder of the Holocaust Survivors' Film Project Inc., which subsequently became the Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies at Yale. His work on trauma extended studies on survivors of the "ethnic cleansing" in Bosnia and of other genocides. He has published and lectured extensively on the multifacted impact of the Holocaust on the lives of survivors and that of their children.

Dr. Laub was born in Czernowitz, Romainia in 1937. He obtained his M.D. at the Hadassah Medical School at Hebrew University in Jerusalem, Israel and his MA in Clinical Psychology at the Bar Ilan University in Ramat Gan, Israel. He is cofounder of the International Study Group for Trauma, Violence and Genocide, which became part of the wide trauma research net in 1998 and he is Deputy Director for Trauma Research at the Yale Genocide Studies Program, or click here for the French version of the website.

Dr. Laub has published on the topic of psychic trauma, its knowing, representation and rememberance, in a variety of psychoanalytic journals and has co-authored a book entitled "Testimony- Crisis of Witnessing in Literature Psychoanalysis and History" with Professor Shoshanna Felman.

Role in the Study:

Organizing an international collaborative interdisplinary effort at describing the phenomenology, formulating the psychodynamics and qualitatively measuring the characteristics of a hither to unacknowledged diagnostic entity- the traumatic psychosis. Defining the appropriate categories into which the observed phenomena fit and finding or devising the proper instruments to measure these phenomena, will greatly contribute to the validity and reliability of such a diagnostic entity and to the search for effective treatment strategies to address it.

Name: Suzanne Kaplan, Ph.D.

Country: Sweden

Biography:

Psychoanalyst, Ph. D. in Education. Affiliated researcher at the Uppsala Program for Holocaust and genocide studies, Uppsala University. Kaplan’s research projects emanate from her work as co-ordinator of the Swedish part of Steven Spielberg’s ‘Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation’ documentation project. From 1995 to 1998 Kaplan coordinated a total of 300 interviews, 40 of which were interviews with child survivors born between 1929 and 1939. This group became the basis of Kaplan’s research project. Kaplan has also worked with victims of the Rwandan genocide. The focus has been on the content of the interviews and ways of coming to terms with recurring memory images and affects. The interviews that have been analyzed in detail form a basis for an emerging conceptual model about trauma related affects within each individual.

Role in the Study:

Kaplan has carefully studied 8 of the testimonies. She is greatly engaged in these testimonies and has an interest in working with them, analyzing them, - trying to conceptualize the psychological phenomena presented in the interviews through contents and affects using a theoretical model that evolved in her previous research regarding child survivors from the Holocaust and further developed after her studies in Rwanda. The model is named ’The affect propeller’ – an analytic tool for trauma related affects.

 

 

Name: Robin Kowalski, Ph.D.

Country: United States

Biography:

Robin M. Kowalski is an expert in the field of interpersonal behavior and social anxiety. She has published five books and numerous articles on these topics. Interest in her research on complaining has been widespread, leading to radio, television, and newspaper interviews around the world. She has appeared on the Today Show (NBC), and articles on her research have been published in USA Today, Health, Allure, Family Circle and Reader's Digest to name a few. She received her Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of North Carolina, Greensboro and is currently professor of psychology at Clemson University.While Kowalski’s research focuses primarily on aversive interpersonal behaviors, lately her team has broadened their research psychology focus to examine the benefits of writing about traumatic events among children and among Holocaust survivors. Her most recent book is entitled, Cyber Bullying: Bullying in the Digital Age and has been published by Blackwell Press. A website devoted to the topic can be found at www.cyberbullyhelp.com

http://www.clemson.edu/psych/people/robin_kowalski.html


Role in the Study:

Kowalski and her team have reviewed 12 of the video testimonies used in this study. The current emphasis is on conducting a linguistic analysis of the narratives. More specifically, Kowalski’s team is using the Jamie Pennebaker’s Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count Strategy (LIWC; 2001). The LIWC has been used in research examining the benefits of writing about traumatic events and is being used in this study to examine differences in the structure and affect accompanying the narratives of those individuals in the experimental and control groups. Kowalsi submitted the data for presentation at the annual meeting of the Southeastern Psychological Association in March, 2006. Dr. Kowalski is currently working on coming up with a coding system for the nonverbal behaviors exhibited by the individuals in their taped testimonies, a system that would be entered into the spss file along with the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count software data.

Name: Marianne Leuzinger-Bohleber, Ph.D.

Country: Germany

Biography:

Marianne Leuzinger-Bohleber is the head of the Sigmund Freud Institute (SFI). The Sigmund Freud Institute is located in Frankfurt, Germany and is the home of not only many active researchers but the nexus of many talks and discussions on current topics of interest to the psychoanalytical community at large. The institute was founded in 1960 in recognition of the important need for an institute to foster social research. The participation of the SFI in our project has great and exciting potential. SFI has a large staff of psychoanalysts who are primarily doing research. SFI also has an outpatient clinic, but has recently put great emphasis on research and addressing the important contemporary issues facing psychoanalysis. The clinical and social-psychological research of the Institute is supplemented by specific offers of supervision, consultation and crisis assistance for groups and organizations as well as by symposiums for participants from a variety of different fields. The SFI prides itself on reacting to and recognizing a modern increased demand for different social, cultural and political mechanisms and organizations, and it encourages a creative, innovative approach to age-old questions in psychoanalysis.

Website: www.sfi-frankfurt.de, http://cms.uni-kassel.de/index.php?id=psychoanalyse

 

Role In the Study:

Marianne Leuzinger-Bohleber has agreed to help facilitate the participation of her institute in our research project. She is eager and excited to join the project and will be reviewing video copies of the testimonies. Dr. Leuzinger-Bohleber is a very involved and prolific researcher herself. She is the author of Outcomes of Psychoanalytic Treatment: Perspectives for Therapist and Researchers and she is a frequent speaker and lecturer not only at SFI but across Europe. Her ability to foster transatlantic interest in the project in the research community will certainly be quite helpful.


Name: Anna Pecoraro, B.Mus., M.A., Psy.D.,

Country: United States

Biography:

Anna Pecoraro, B.Mus., M.A., Psy.D., is a psychological researcher, psychotherapist, and musician. She earned her bachelor of music degree in music education/voice from Westminster Choir College in Princeton, NJ and her masters and doctoral degrees in clinical psychology from the Institute for Graduate Clinical Psychology of Widener University in Chester, PA. She completed an APA-approved pre-doctoral internship in clinical psychology at Widener University, with rotations at the Treatment Research Institute at the University of Pennsylvania, where she worked on NIH-funded research in substance abuse. Dr. Pecoraro specializes in the acquisition, preservation, analysis, and teaching of songs related to the Pogroms and the Shoah and performs and records these under the stage name Channa Aizenberg of Voloshyn. As a member of the Westminster Symphonic Choir, she has sung with the New York Philharmonic and New Jersey Symphonies. She was a 2006 fellow of the Yale Child Study Center’s Psychoanalytic Research Training Programme and a 2006-07 fellow of the Philadelphia Center for Psychoanalysis, where she pursued Holocaust-related research. She has presented locally, nationally, and internationally on her own Holocaust-related qualitative and quantitative research. She also pursues empirical research on trauma-related deficits in affective mentalization and co-occurring psychiatric and substance abuse disorders. Her most recent book, a fundraiser for the medical care of Dr. Albert Ellis, The Survival Guide for the Teenage Brain: How NOT to Drive Yourself Crazy, is available at http://www.lulu.com/annpecoraro .

Name: Ethel Tillinger

Country: Australia

Biography:


Ethel was born in Melbourne Australia in 1949. She is currently practicing as a Psychologist at the University of Melbourne Counseling Service and as a Psychotherapist in private practice. She works primarily with adults and young adults using both individual and group approaches. Her work is informed by an interest and research in trauma and psychoanalysis. She was a committee member of the Australasian Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (ASTSS an affiliate of ISTSS) Victorian Chapter between 1997 – 2004 in the roles of President and State Representative and helped write draft guidelines for training in trauma work. In 2001 she was a member of a group of mental health professionals who wrote a submission to the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission (HREOC), National Inquiry into Children in Immigration Detention entitled “Kids In Detention Story” (KIDS) and also contributed to an ASTSS submission on the same issue.

In 2005 Ethel went to Poland with the Adult March of the Living (AMoTL) as a member of a group of mental health facilitators who provided psychological support to over 70 participants. The trauma-tracking instrument developed in her research was used in briefing sessions to prepare for the program.

For the past 6 years she has been a member of an Intergenerational Dialogue group comprised of Holocaust survivors, child survivors and second generation who meet to dialogue across generations about the reverberations of the Holocaust on them .

Ethel is currently completing a Masters Thesis entitled “Testimony: The relationship of silence to knowledge”, which seeks to explore the effects on Holocaust survivors of giving testimony interviews. In the course of this research she has constructed and trialed an instrument designed to track trauma integration and disintegration in interviews with survivors of massive psychic trauma.

Name: Nancy Isserman

Country: United States

Biography:

Nancy Isserman, PhD, has been the co-director of the Transcending Trauma Project since 1993. The Transcending Trauma Project is under the auspices of the Council for Relationships, an affiliate of Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, PA. The Transcending Trauma Project is a large qualitative research project that interviewed 95 survivors and 180 survivor family members, many in the second and third generations. TTP used grounded research methodology and in-depth psychosocial life narratives to analyze how survivors rebuilt their lives after the war. Dr. Isserman recently completed a dissertation for the political science department of the Graduate Center, City University of New York entitled, “I Harbor No Hate”: A Study of Tolerance and Intolerance in Holocaust Survivors. She was given the Randolph L. Braham Dissertation Year Award in 2004-2005. She is also the Associate Director of the Feinstein Center for American Jewish History at Temple University.

Name: Hanna Kliger Peltz, Ph.D.

Country: United States

Biography:

Hannah Kliger is Senior Adviser to the Chancellor and Professor of Communications and Jewish Studies at Pennsylvania State University, The Abington College, where she has also been Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. A graduate of Barnard College (B.A., Sociology) and the University of Pennsylvania ( M.A., Ph.D., Communication), Kliger has also served as Associate Dean for Graduate Studies and Senior Research Investigator at the University of Pennsylvania's Annenberg School for Communication and as Associate Dean for Education at MCP Hahnemann University (now Drexel) School of Public Health. From 1985 until 1997, she was a faculty member at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Dr. Kliger’s publications focus on the communicative practices and communal organizations of minority groups. In addition to her book on the ethnic voluntary associations of Jewish immigrants (Indiana University Press, 1992), she has authored numerous articles on communication and culture in immigrant communities. The National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Council of Learned Societies recognized Kliger for her scholarly and curricular initiatives. Her current research is based with the Transcending Trauma Project, a multidisciplinary research team exploring coping and adaptation after trauma. She is also an Academic Fellow of the Psychoanalytic Center of Philadelphia, applying psychoanalytic ideas to understanding organizational dynamics and leadership.

Name: Imke Hansen, M.A.

Country: Germany

Biography:

Imke Hansen is a lecturer in East European History and a doctoral candidate in History at Hamburg University, Germany. She specializes in Belarusian, Polish, and East European Jewish History; the theory of Identity and Nationalism; and Oral History. Her current research focus is on Catholic-Polish – Jewish conflicts around memory and its manifestation in Auschwitz. She conducts interviews for international oral history projects on the Holocaust and leads study groups at the Auschwitz Museum on the past and present of Auschwitz. She received her M.A. in Political Science at Hamburg University in 2004, and was an assistant professor of Political Science at Belarusian State University in Minsk from 2004 to 2005.

Name: Werner Bohleber

Country: Germany

Biography:

Werner Bohleber, Dr. phil, psychoanalyst in private practice in Frankfurt/Germany. Training and Supervising Analyst, former President of the German Psychoanalytical Association and now Vice-president. Member of the Board of Representatives of the International Psychoanalytical Association. Editor of the German psychoanalytical journal PSYCHE. Author of several books and numerous articles. His main research subjects are trauma; adolescence and identity formation; investigation of Nationalsocialism; xenophobia and antisemitism. He is particularly interested in investigating the unconscious phantasmatic world of antisemitism. On this background he also studied unconscious phantasies in the islamistic fundamentalism after September 11. His paper on this subject is published in German and in English (In: Varvin&Volkan(Eds.): Violence or Dialogue? Psychoanalytic Insights on Terror and Terrorism. London International Psychonalytic Association) 2003). He is a member of the IPA working group on terror and terrorism.

Name: Irit Felsen

Country: United States

Biography:

Irit Felsen, Ph.D., is a Clinical Psychologist residing in Mountain Lakes, New Jersey. Irit was a clinical consultant and Jewish Family Service Coordinator of Holocaust Services at the Jewish Family Service of Metro West, and an expert on the impact of the Holocaust on children of survivors. She has been published in the International Handbook of Multigenerational Legacies of Trauma and the American Journal of Orthopsychiatry on transgenerational transmission of the effects of the Holocaust. She is currently in private practice, and also currently on a national crisis intervention team and taking part in the Holocaust Council of MetroWest. Dr. Felsen consults the council with regard to academic and educational conferences for professionals and teachers to understand the immediate and long-term effects of trauma and persecution.

Name: Andreas Hamburger

Country: Germany

Biography:

Andreas Hamburger, born in Munich/Germany in 1954, studied German Literature, History, Social Science, Philosophy and Psychology at the universities of Basel/Switzerland, Vienna/Austria and Munich/Germany and completed his studies at Munich University by 1978 with a high school teachers exam and 1982 with the Diploma in Psychology, followed in 1987 by a distinguished doctoral thesis on children’s dreams. In 2005 he achieved his senior researchers degree (Habilitation) at Kassel University.

He works as a psychoanalyst (DPG), training analyst and supervisor in Munich, senior lecturer and visiting professor for psychoanalytic psychology at Kassel University and research fellow at the Sigmund-Freud-Institute Frankfurt/M./Germany.

Prior research and publications on children’s dreams, language development, marital relationships, interactional microanalysis of suspense dramaturgy in literature, drama and film. Current research interests focus on developmental trauma and videotestimony evaluation.

Website: http://cms.uni-kassel.de/index.php?id=psychoanalyse

Name: Ilany Kogan

Country: Israel

Biography:

Ilany Kogan, M.A., born 1946. Training analyst at the Israel Psychoanalytic Society. Member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Fritz-Bauer Institut for Holocaust Studies, Frankfurt, Germany. Clinical supervisor at the Department of Children and Adolescents, Eppendorf Hospital, Hamburg, Germany, and supervisor of candidates and members of the MAP , Munich, Germany. Supervisor of the Psychotherapy Centre for the Child and Adolescent, Bucharest, Romania. Teacher and supervisor at the IPA Psychoanalytic Group, Istanbul, Turkey.

For many years worked extensively with Holocaust survivors’ offspring, and published a book entitled The Cry of Mute Children - A Psychoanalytic Perspective of the Second Generation of the Holocaust, Free Association Books: London and New York (1995). The book has also been published in German by Fischer Verlag: Frankfurt (1998); in Romanian by Editura Trei: Bucharest (2001); in French by Delachaux et Niestle: Geneva and Paris (2001); in Croatian by antiBARBARUS.

Ilany has recently published two books: Escape from Selfhood - Breaking Boundaries and Craving for Oneness, London: IPA Publications (2007) and The Struggle Against Mourning, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield, (2007).

Name: Rael Strous

Country: Israel

Biography:

Rael Strous, M.D. functions as the Director of a Chronic Inpatient Department at the Beer Yaakov Mental Health Center and Senior Lecturer in the Department of Psychiatry at the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University in Israel. Following the completion of his medical school studies at the Witwatersrand Medical School in his native country of South Africa, he went on to complete his psychiatry residency training at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York and a clinical research fellowship in psychopharmacology at Harvard Medical School, based at the Massachusetts Mental Health Center. He has over 100 peer-reviewed manuscripts to his name publishing in the fields of trauma, psychopharmacology, autoimmunity, genetics, epidemiology, neuroimaging and ethics. He has recently published several papers, in addition to lecturing extensively in several international settings, on the intimate role that psychiatrists and the mental health profession played in the genocidal process during the Nazi Era including ethical lessons that may be learned for the modern professional.

Name: Alex Hinton

Country: United States

Biography:

Alex Hinton is Director of the Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights and Associate Professor of Anthropology and Global Affairs at Rutgers University, Newark.

He is the author of Why Did They Kill? Cambodia in the Shadow of Genocide (California, 2005) and five edited or co-edited collections, Genocide: Truth, Memory, and Representation (Duke, forthcoming), Night of the Khmer Rouge: Genocide and Democracy in Cambodia (Paul Robeson Gallery, 2007), Annihilating Difference: The Anthropology of Genocide (California, 2002), Genocide: An Anthropological Reader (Blackwell, 2002), and Biocultural Approaches to the Emotions (Cambridge, 1999). He is currently working on several other book projects, including an edited volume on Local Justice, a book on 9/11 and Abu Ghraib, and a book on the politics of memory and justice in the aftermath of the Cambodian genocide. He serves as an Academic Advisor to the Documentation Center of Cambodia, on the International Advisory Boards of the Journal of Genocide Research and Genocide Studies and Prevention, as the editor of the Palgrave book series, “Culture, Mind, and Society,” and as the Second Vice-President and Executive Board member of the International Association of Genocide Scholars.

Name: Sverre Varvin

Country: Norway

Biography:

Sverre Varvin M.D., is currently a Psychoanalyst in Private practice, as well as a Senior researcher at the Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, which is affiliated with the University of Oslo. He has held many positions in the Norwegian Psychoanalytical Society and International Psychoanalytical Association and is presently chair of the European Psychoanalytic Association’s working group on trauma. Dr. Varvin’s many honors include, receiving “The Idunn Prize,” for academic books in 2002, and the 2004 “Sigourney award,” for researchers who have contributed in a significant or major way to clinical psychoanalysis or psychoanalytical research. His past research endeavors have included work with district psychiatric services, victims of violence, treatment of schizophrenic patients, process-outcome studies of psychoanalytic psychotherapy with severely traumatised refugees, and the Research Leader of the Oslo II study on process outcome of psychoanalysis. He is also involved in a project on traumatic dreams.

Name: Arnold Modell

Country: USA

Biography:

Name: Rony Blum

Country: USA/Israel

Biography:

Dr. Blum’s postdoctoral research, intervention, and studies have dealt with transgenerational resilience in genocide survivor families, as well as preventing future genocide. Her policy work at Hebrew University-Hadassah aided in the evacuation of Israeli children and Holocaust survivors from war torn areas during the Second Lebanon War, worked with Sudanese genocide survivors, and initiated an Adopt a Granny program for Children & Orphans of the Holocaust in Israel (YESH). Her PhD in History won an award from the government of Canada and the Jacob Leib Talmon prize for the MA,& published Ghost Brothers (MQUP 2005), articles, and policy briefs. Her postdoctoral studies have been in neuropsychology, EMDR, cultural psychiatry, medical anthropology, and intergenerational family therapy.She has collaborated with the Parliamentary Holocaust Survivor Network & Holocaust Survivor Rights in Israel, is a member of the International Association of Genocide Scholars, the Global Forum on Anti-Semitism (Min. for Foreign Affairs), a Genocide Prevention Team, and on the Coalition for DarfurRefugees in Israel. Dr. Blum has also worked on research projects suchas: Quality of Care project for Israeli hospitals (Ministry of Health& Hadassah) and contributed to mental health evaluation and services studies (Ministry of Health, Falk Institute for Mental Health & Behavioral Studies, Association for Psychiatric Services) that recommended that survivors in psychiatric wards be released in the community, seconded by ambulatory services.

Role in the Study:

Having synthesized a multilevel macro-micro methodology thatspecifically examines, yet distinguishes between, the intersectionof cultural-anthropological and historical biographical/narrativeimpacts upon clinical outcomes. This analysis of survivor testimonies, plusher familiarity with relevant networks, health services/systems, & public policies, will help contextualize treatment, & specify the context of the survivors’ predicament.

Name: Selma Leydesdorff

Country: Netherlands

Biography:

Selma Leydesdorff is Professor of Oral History and Culture at the University of Amsterdam. She has been interviewing extensively on the Jewish community of Amsterdam, on the concentration camps of Mauthausen, and has participated in the Forced Labor project directed by the University of Hagen. She is one of the principal editors of the series Memory and Narrative (Transactions Publishers). She has been teaching oral history and life stories mostly in Amsterdam but also in China, Georgia, Istanbul, and Suriname. Her research on the stories of the victims of Srebrenica has received a lot of attention in the Netherlands and is seen as an important critique of the politics of the government and the silence and complacency about these matters. Some major publications include: We lived with Dignity, The Jewish proletariat of Amsterdam 1900-1940 (Wayne State Un. Press 1998) and the International Yearbook for Oral History and Life Stories, Vol. IV special issue: With L. Passerini and P. Thompson, Gender and Memory, Oxford 1996 (reprint 2005).

 

Name: Onno van der Hart

Country: Netherlands

Biography:

A psychologist, adult psychotherapist, trained family therapist and researcher, Dr. van der Hart is Professor of Psychopathology of Chronic Traumatization at the Department of Clinical and Health Psychology at Utrecht University, the Netherlands, and a psychologist/psychotherapist at the Sinai Center for Mental Health, Amsterdam. He is clinical consultant of the Center for Post-Trauma Therapy and Trauma Eduction, Helsinki and Oulu, Finland. Until recently Dr. van der Hart was Chief of Research at the Cats-Polm Institute—a research institute in the area of childhood abuse and neglect—in Zeist and a lead psychotherapist, specialized in the treatment of clients with complex trauma-related disorders, at the Mental Health Center Buitenamstel in Amsterdam.

Currently, Prof. van der Hart is working with colleagues Ellert Nijenhuis, PhD, and Kathy Steele, MN, CS, on a theoretical approach on trauma-related structural dissociation of the personality and treatment model which unifies psychiatric disorders with a traumatic stress origin. Their combined efforts resulted, among other things, in the publication of their book, "The Haunted Self: Structural Dissociation and the Treatment of Chronic Traumatization" (New York/London: W.W. Norton & Cie, 2006), for which they received the Media Award of the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation.