Yale University. Calendar. Directories.

Yale wordmarks

Every Yale academic or administrative organization can benefit from Yale’s new identity system. This system calls for “branding” visual communications/publications with the Yale logo or the particular “wordmark” of the organization.

Yale wordmarks adhere to strict typographic specifications and are derived by extending the Yale logo with the name of a Yale organization:

Logo + “extension” (organization name) = wordmark

The typography of the extension varies according to the role of a Yale organization.

Small-capitals entities
Italics entities
Yale College
Wordmark use
Wordmark creation
Wordmark colors
Multiple logos


Small-capitals entities

For schools, administrative divisions, programs, or organizations that report directly to the President through his Council of Deans and Directors. For example:

Back to Top

Italics entities (form one)

For organizations, labs, and offices that do not report directly to the President when the relevant dean or director specifies that the small-cap wordmark appear on publications above the name of the subentity.


Italics entities (form two)

For organizations, labs, and offices that do not report directly to the President when the dean or director specifies that the subentity may appear as a “stand-alone" italic extension after the Yale logo.

Back to Top

Yale College

Yale College and its subentities may use the following logo in lieu of the Yale logo:

This logo may be used alone or, with the dean’s approval, with extensions to create wordmarks following the basic structures outlined above for creating wordmarks using the Yale logo. All wordmarks created using the Yale College logo should be set in type by the University Printer and approved by the Secretary of the University.

Back to Top

Wordmark use

A Yale logo or a Yale wordmark should appear on every Yale publication. Generally speaking one appearance is sufficient for any one print, Web, or moving-image piece; and it would be visually redundant to use both an organization’s wordmark and a Yale logo on any given page. A wordmark may be used as titling, but its primary purpose is to serve as a uniform identifier and logo for a Yale organization. As such, it can be set quite small, and it works effectively as a “brand stamp” applied on the back cover of a publication or at the bottom left corner of Web pages.

It should not be used in close proximity to a legacy logo or shield, the mark of another organization, or in any arrangement that creates the appearance of a compound logo.

Legacy logos or traditional shields may be used decoratively or transitionally on publications that are marked with the Yale logo as specified here, but these older marks should not be featured in a way that dilutes or confuses the primacy of the Yale logo or wordmarks. New logos for Yale organizations (other than the new wordmarks) should not be designed or used at this time. Please see A note about logos for further information about Yale’s guidelines regarding the use of nonstandard logos.

Back to Top

Wordmark creation

Because specific typefaces, sizing, and spacing are required, all wordmarks must be set in type either by Yale Printing & Publishing Services or the Office of the University Printer.

Back to Top

Wordmark colors

The standard color for rendition of the Yale logo and wordmarks in print and digital formats is Yale Blue or Web Yale Blue. For all official Yale stationery and business cards, Yale Blue only is specified; alternative colors require permission of the Office of the University Printer. For display use in print and on the Web, the wordmarks are effectively rendered in Yale Blue (for the logo) with Pantone 645 (for the extension) as shown in the examples above.

Back to Top

Note about using multiple logos

While it’s common practice to display groups of logos in print and Web communications, it is Yale’s practice to avoid the visual clutter and commercialization of this method of recognizing multiple sponsorship in its publications, letterhead, and business cards. For example, when several Yale organizations have sponsored an event, only the wordmark of the primary Yale sponsor may be used in the collateral materials. The names of the other sponsors should be listed in text. If one sponsoring organization does not rise above the others, only the Yale logo—without an organizational extension—may be used, with all participants listed in text. The same rules apply to collaborations and partnerships with non-Yale commercial and academic entities. All entities involved should be listed in text, but only the Yale logo or a Yale wordmark may be used.

Only with approval of the Secretary of the University or the Director of Marketing and Trademark Licensing may the Yale logo or wordmarks appear in non-Yale publications. When such use is approved, the Yale logo or wordmarks may appear alongside others in those publications or event settings.

There are potentially many instances in which this policy may need to be mediated. Please contact John Gambell, University Printer, or Stephanie Schwartz, Director of Marketing and Trademark Licensing, if you have questions.

Back to Top

Yale QuickLinks.