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Master of Public Health

Yale’s Master of Public Health (M.P.H.) degree program is designed for highly motivated students with related work experience or a professional degree as well as a substantial interest in an area of public health. A unique sequencing of courses, community-based programmatic activities, and field or laboratory research provides students with multiple opportunities to define their specialty and to tailor their course of study.

Individualized programs are shaped by frequent interactions with faculty through courses, field experiences, and the thesis. An important component of the M.P.H. program is the faculty-student relationship, institutionalized in the form of an advisory system. Students are expected to work with their adviser in selecting appropriate courses, deciding on their internship and thesis, and integrating learning from all their experiences.

M.P.H. students focus their studies in one of the following departments: Biostatistics, Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, Environmental Health Sciences, or Health Policy and Management. In addition, students may focus their studies in programs in the Social and Behavioral Sciences division and in the Health Policy Program (HPP) or the Health Care Management Program (HCMP). Students select their department/division/program at the time of application.

The Advanced Professional M.P.H. Program is available for individuals with doctoral-level degrees in a field related to public health and for medical students. Students in the AP Program apply to one of six tracks: Applied Biostatistics and Epidemiology; Health Policy; Social and Behavioral Sciences; Global Health; Preventive Medicine; and Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

The B.A.-B.S./M.P.H. Select Program gives Yale college students interested in the field of public health the opportunity to earn a bachelor’s degree from Yale College and an M.P.H. degree from the Yale School of Public Health in a five-year joint-degree program.

The Global Health Concentration is a multidisciplinary approach that encourages creativity and innovation, while fostering a global perspective. The concentration emphasizes an integrative problem-solving approach to global health issues. Students in the Global Health Concentration may complete this concentration while they satisfy the requirements of their respective department/division/program. Students choose the concentration at the time of application.

The Regulatory Affairs Track prepares students for future roles in the area of quality control and regulatory affairs. This track operates within the existing YSPH academic structure, and students receive a certificate of completion at the time they graduate. Students complete all of the core and departmental requirements as well as the required courses for the track.

All M.P.H. students are urged to develop programs of study that include courses from other departments within YSPH and throughout the University in order to benefit from the strengths of Yale’s professional and graduate schools and learn ways to understand the complexity and multidimensionality of most public health issues.

Students in the traditional two-year M.P.H. program are required to complete 20 course units, which include the core curriculum, departmental/divisional/program requirements, and electives both within YSPH and in other schools at the University. Course units are not given for seminars and colloquia.

Full-time students must carry a minimum of 4 course units per term for four terms and must complete all course requirements (including the thesis) within five years of matriculation. A thesis is not required for students in the Health Policy and Management department.

Part-time student status is granted to those students taking fewer than 4 course units per term. Part-time students are encouraged to take at least 2 course units per term and must complete all course requirements (including the thesis) within five years of matriculation.

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Core Curriculum for the Traditional Two-Year M.P.H. Degree

Course number

Course title

Course units

BIS 505a and b

  • Introduction to Statistical Thinking I & II

1 each term

CDE/EMD 508a

  • Principles of Epidemiology I

1

  • EPH 100a
  • Professional Skills Seminar

0

  • EPH 515b
  • Introduction to Research and Professional Ethics Seminar

0

EPH 520c

  • Summer Internship

0

EPH 525b

  • Thesis (not required in HPM department)

2

One of the following:

CDE 505a

  • Social and Behavioral Foundations of Health

1

CDE 571b

  • Psychosocial and Behavioral Epidemiology

1

One of the following:

EHS 503b

  • Introduction to Toxicology

1

EHS 510a

  • Contemporary Issues in Environmental Health

1

One of the following:

HPM 510a

  • Introduction to Health Policy and Health Systems

1

HPM 560b

  • Health Economics and U.S. Health Policy

1

Public Health Practice requirement All students in the M.P.H. program are required to complete a Public Health Practice experience. YSPH Public Health Practice requirement guidelines are outlined in Appendix I. There are four options for satisfying this requirement:

EPH 500b

  • Public Health Practicum

1

EPH 520c

  • Summer Internship

0

EPH 542b

  • Community Health Program Planning

1

HPM 555a or b

  • Health Policy and Health Care Management Practicum

1

Competencies of the Core Curriculum

Upon completing the core curriculum of the M.P.H. program, the student will be able to:

  • • Demonstrate a knowledge base in the disciplines of biostatistics, chronic and infectious disease epidemiology, health systems, public policy, social and behavioral sciences, and environmental health.
  • • Apply basic research skills to specific public health problems in both group and individual settings, including the ability to define problems; construct, articulate, and test hypotheses; draw conclusions; and communicate findings to a variety of audiences.
  • • Explain the interrelationships between a multitude of factors that can impact on a public health problem, including scientific, medical, environmental, cultural, social, behavioral, economic, political, and ethical factors.
  • • Review, critique, and evaluate public health reports and research articles.
  • • Apply public health concepts, principles, and methodologies acquired through formal course work to actual problems experienced in the community or work environment.
  • • Critically evaluate programs, interventions, and outcomes that relate to public health practice.
  • • Apply ethical standards and professional values as they relate to the practice of public health.
  • • Demonstrate sensitivity to the social context within which public health professionals practice.

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M.P.H. Departments, Divisions, Programs, Tracks, and Concentrations

Biostatistics Department

Hongyu Zhao, Ph.D., Chair

Biostatistics is a scientific discipline that focuses on developing new statistical methodology and theory to address important questions in the biological and health sciences, including study designs, data collection, modeling, analysis, and result interpretations. In addition to independent methodological and theoretical developments, the faculty in the Department of Biostatistics are involved in a wide variety of collaborative research efforts throughout the University, including at the School of Public Health and the School of Medicine. We bring these innovations into practice through active participation in many disciplines at Yale and beyond. Biostatistics students learn statistical theories, methods, and tools for valid and efficient study designs, data collections, and analysis in biomedical research. Students will also gain real-world experiences through intern opportunities and master theses. Our students are well prepared for positions in public and nonprofit agencies, medical centers, and various industries, as well as for doctoral studies in biostatistics and related fields.

Departmental Requirements for the M.P.H. in Biostatistics

Course number

Course title

Course units

BIS 525a and b

  • Seminar in Biostatistics

0

BIS 540a

  • Fundamentals of Clinical Trials

1

BIS 623a

  • Applied Regression Analysis

1

BIS 625a

  • Categorical Data Analysis

1

BIS 628b

  • Longitudinal and Multilevel Data Analysis

1

BIS 630b

  • Applied Survival Analysis (half-term)

0.5

  • BIS 632b
  • Design and Analysis of Epidemiologic Studies (half-term)

0.5

*STAT 541a

  • Probability Theory

1

*STAT 542b

  • Theory of Statistics

1

EPH 525b

  • Thesis

2

*These courses are offered in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.
Competencies for the M.P.H. in Biostatistics

Upon receiving an M.P.H. with a concentration in Biostatistics, the student will be able to:

  • • Describe concepts of probability, random variation, and commonly used statistical probability distributions.
  • • Develop an efficient design for collecting, recording, and storing data collected in the conduct of public health and medical research.
  • • Develop sample size and statistical power calculations for basic study designs including those utilized in clinical trials.
  • • Design efficient computer programs for study management, statistical analysis, as well as presentations using SAS and other programming languages.
  • • Produce edited data sets suitable for statistical analyses.
  • • Apply informatics techniques with vital statistics and public health records in the description of public health characteristics and in public health research and evaluation.
  • • Perform analyses of stated hypotheses using a variety of analytical tools including analysis of variance, multiple regression, nonparametric statistics, logistic regression, multivariate analyses, and methods for analyzing rates and failure time data.
  • • Interpret results of statistical analyses and use these results to make relevant inferences from data.
  • • Produce working tables and statistical summaries describing research in health science.
  • • Develop written presentations based on statistical analyses for both public health professionals and educated lay audiences.
  • • Develop oral presentations based on statistical analyses for both public health professionals and educated lay audiences.

Regulatory Affairs Track

Robert W. Makuch, Ph.D., Professor of Biostatistics, Director

Every drug, medical device, diagnostic test, and food sold in the United States must meet rigorous standards that are intended to insure that all products satisfy a set of safety and performance objectives. Scientists must possess the knowledge and expertise to create and implement high-quality systems as well as understand the environment encompassing regulatory compliance. Other essential skills include project management and leadership, scientific tools that allow for proper risk assessment and risk management strategies, and the ability to clearly communicate the regulatory decisions made.

The Regulatory Affairs Track is an interdisciplinary program that may be combined with any departmental concentration. Four courses are required. The track covers a wide array of regulatory affairs topics, including complex issues involving food and drug law, ethics, clinical trials, epidemiology, risk analysis, and leadership and change management.

The Regulatory Affairs Track is directed by Professor Robert Makuch, who has extensive experience working with pharmaceutical companies and government agencies on regulatory affairs issues. Students apply for admission to the track during the fall term of their first year in the M.P.H. program. Professor Makuch will hold a meeting during the fall term to review the regulatory affairs academic program and the admissions process.

Requirements for the M.P.H. in the Regulatory Affairs Track

  • Course number
  • Course title
  • Course units
  • BIS 540a
  • Fundamentals of Clinical Trials
  • 1
  • BIS 575b
  • Introduction to Regulatory Affairs
  • 1
  • Two of the following:
  • BIS 561b
  • Advanced Topics and Case Studies in Multicenter Clinical Trials
  • 1
  • CDE 650a
  • Introduction to Evidence-Based Medicine and Health Care
  • 1
  • EHS 511a
  • Applied Risk Assessment
  • 1
  • HPM 570a
  • Cost-Effectiveness Analysis and Decision Making
  • 1

Competencies for the Regulatory Affairs Track

Upon completion of the track, the student will be able to:

  • • Utilize the best scientific and ethical standards to insure that food, pharmaceutical, and medical and diagnostic devices meet quality and regulatory standards.
  • • Develop/use leadership and management skills for conducting/overseeing research and clinical studies that are required by regulatory agencies.
  • • Develop processes that insure clear and consistent decisions to the public and to regulatory agencies.
  • • Assess/develop risk management strategies that can be used to get new products to the market swiftly, while assuring the consumer and regulatory bodies that efficacy and safety have been preserved.

Chronic Disease Epidemiology Department

Susan T. Mayne, Ph.D., Chair

Epidemiology is the study of the frequency, distribution, and causes of diseases in human populations. Chronic Disease Epidemiology (CDE) aims to enhance understanding about the determinants of chronic diseases in populations and how to intervene most effectively to reduce morbidity and mortality due to chronic diseases. CDE strives to advance public health by promoting a research-based approach to the prevention and management of chronic disease. By focusing on the health of populations, as opposed to individuals, CDE utilizes places (neighborhoods, cities, states, countries), institutions (schools, housing developments, correctional facilities, workplaces), and health care facilities (newborn nurseries, nursing homes, public health clinics, hospitals) as its laboratories.

CDE students learn how to identify the types of data needed, choose appropriate data collection methods, collect the data, and analyze the data appropriately so that the whole research effort leads to the improvement of the health of populations. The CDE curriculum emphasizes critical thinking, based on thorough knowledge of research methods, and its application to the scientific literature, to the development of research protocols, and to the design, implementation, and analysis of epidemiologic investigations. A principal research instrument of the chronic disease epidemiologist is often the questionnaire. The development of valid, reliable, and unambiguous questionnaires is a skill taught to all CDE students. Increasingly, epidemiologists also make use of genetic and biologic markers to indicate exposure to potentially damaging agents or as signs of increased susceptibility to or early onset of disease. Students learn the role of these methodologies throughout the program through course work, seminars, and practicum experiences.

Students learn about the role of epidemiology in a broad range of public health and medical areas, including the fields of aging, cancer, cardiovascular disease, global health, molecular and genetic epidemiology, perinatal and reproductive epidemiology, and psychosocial epidemiology, all areas in which the CDE department has particular strength. Among the resources available to students are the Yale Cancer Center; the Connecticut Tumor Registry (the oldest of its kind in the world); the Center for Perinatal, Pediatric, and Environmental Epidemiology; the Yale Program on Aging; and the Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS. M.P.H. graduates of the CDE department find employment in a variety of research, public health practice, and advocacy settings, including academic institutions; public health agencies at the international, national, state, and local levels; the pharmaceutical industry; charitable foundations; and a variety of other nonprofit organizations. For example, graduates may obtain positions in such federal agencies as the National Institutes of Health (NIH) or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Nonprofit agencies, such as cancer or heart associations, also recruit graduates to participate in or direct community health programs. Private industries, including pharmaceutical companies, find the quantitative skills of CDE graduates useful in monitoring drug safety and in conducting clinical research. Many CDE graduates subsequently pursue doctoral degrees in public health or other professional or academic fields.

Departmental Requirements for the M.P.H. in Chronic Disease Epidemiology

Course number

  • Course title

Course units

  • CDE 516b
  • Principles of Epidemiology II

1

  • CDE 523b
  • Measurement Issues in Chronic Disease Epidemiology

1

  • CDE 525a and b
  • Seminar in Chronic Disease Epidemiology/Social and Behavioral Sciences

0

  • CDE 534b
  • Applied Analytic Methods in Epidemiology

1

EPH 525

  • Thesis

One additional biostatistics course beyond BIS 505a and 505b

1

One of the following:

  • CDE/EHS 502b
  • Physiology for Public Health

1

  • CDE 532b
  • Epidemiology of Cancer

1

  • CDE 535b
  • Epidemiology of Heart Disease and Stroke

1

  • CDE 562a
  • Nutrition and Chronic Disease
  • 1

Chronic Disease Epidemiology students are advised to take two additional CDE elective courses.

Competencies for the M.P.H. In Chronic Disease Epidemiology

Upon receiving an M.P.H. with a concentration in Chronic Disease Epidemiology, the student will be able to:

  • • Evaluate the scientific merit and feasibility of epidemiologic study designs.
  • • Describe the epidemiology of common chronic diseases with more in-depth knowledge of a specialty area.
  • • Apply basic principles of health promotion and disease prevention to prevent and control chronic diseases.
  • • Synthesize information from a variety of epidemiologic and related studies.
  • • Design and carry out epidemiologic studies, with minimal supervision.
  • • Analyze data and draw appropriate inferences from epidemiologic studies at an intermediate level.
  • • Demonstrate oral and written communication and presentation skills to effectively communicate and disseminate results to various professional and community audiences.
  • • Describe basic pathophysiologic and/or psychopathologic mechanisms.
  • • Identify, interpret, and use routinely collected data on disease occurrence.
  • • Review, critique and evaluate epidemiologic reports and research articles at an intermediate level.

Social and Behavioral Sciences Division

Trace S. Kershaw, Ph.D., Acting Division Head

The overall purpose of the Social and Behavioral Sciences (SBS) division, within the CDE department, is to provide instruction in the theory and methods of the social and behavioral sciences that emphasize the social, psychological, and behavioral influences on health, illness, and recovery. The primary emphases are focused on (1) understanding the psychosocial, behavioral, community, and societal influences on health in the general population, including those who are disadvantaged; and (2) creating multilevel interventions that eliminate barriers to health, from infancy to old age.

The SBS curriculum is unique in that it takes an interdisciplinary approach and combines courses in social and behavioral sciences and epidemiology. SBS students will share courses with other CDE students in epidemiologic methods and biostatistics. SBS students will take two additional courses. The first teaches SBS-related methods. The second teaches students practical and advanced skills for the development and implementation of their own interventions in health promotion and disease prevention. In addition, SBS students will conduct a thesis that draws on a topic and methods related to the social and behavioral sciences.

Divisional Requirements for the M.P.H. in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Course number

Course title

Course units

  • CDE 505a
  • Social and Behavioral Foundations of Health
  • 1
  • CDE 516b
  • Principles of Epidemiology II
  • 1
  • CDE 525a and b
  • Seminar in Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Social and Behavioral Sciences
  • 0
  • CDE 534b
  • Applied Analytic Methods in Epidemiology
  • 1
  • CDE 574b
  • Developing a Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Intervention
  • 1
  • CDE 577b
  • Interdisciplinary Research Methods in the Social and Behavioral Sciences
  • 1
  • EPH 525
  • Thesis
  • 2

Social and Behavioral Sciences students are advised to take two of the following electives:

  • CDE 531a
  • Health and Aging
  • 1
  • CDE 545b
  • Health Disparities by Race and Social Class
  • 1
  • CDE 571b
  • Psychosocial and Behavioral Epidemiology
  • 1
  • CDE 572a
  • Obesity Prevention and Lifestyle Interventions
  • 1
  • CDE 573a
  • Social and Cultural Factors in Mental Health and Illness
  • 1
  • CDE 575b
  • Religion, Health, and Society
  • 1
  • CDE 585a
  • Sexuality, Health, and Human Rights
  • 1
  • CDE 594a
  • Maternal-Child Public Health Nutrition
  • 1
  • CDE 676b
  • Questionnaire Development
  • 1
  • HPM 590b
  • Addiction, Economics, and Public Policy
  • 1

Any course in social and behavioral sciences from across the University at level 300 or above, with approval of course instructor and YSPH faculty adviser.

Competencies for The M.P.H. in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Upon receiving an M.P.H. with a concentration in Social and Behavioral Sciences, the student will be able to:

  • • Identify the effects of social, psychological, and behavioral factors on individual and population health, including prevention, treatment, and management of chronic disease, adjustment to illness, adherence to treatment regimens, and promotion of recovery.
  • • Analyze health from multiple levels, including the individual, social group, community, and society.
  • • Critically evaluate and interpret the public health scientific literature as presented in professional journals and the popular media, including descriptive, analytic, and intervention studies.
  • • Construct research hypotheses and design a study to test these hypotheses.
  • • Describe how culture, social inequities, and biology influence health across the life span.
  • • Apply social, psychological, and behavioral theory in the design, implementation, and evaluation of prevention interventions aimed toward: (a) reducing psychological risk factors (e.g., racism); (b) increasing psychosocial well-being (e.g., coping with chronic illness); (c) increasing health-promoting behaviors (e.g., exercise); and (d) decreasing health-damaging behaviors (e.g., risky sex).
  • • Develop procedures and training materials to implement effective behavioral interventions.
  • • Identify ways to address health inequalities and promote health equity.
  • • Describe the appropriate statistical analyses to examine different types of research questions in the social and behavioral sciences.
  • • Demonstrate oral and written communication and presentation skills to effectively communicate and disseminate results to various professional and community audiences.
  • • Explain the dynamic interaction between policies and the social and behavioral sciences.
  • • Apply ethical principles involved in social and behavioral sciences as they relate to public health.

Environmental Health Sciences Department

Brian P. Leaderer, M.P.H., Ph.D., Acting Chair

In the course of their daily activities individuals spend time in a variety of spaces (i.e., residences, industrial and nonindustrial workplaces, automobiles, outdoors), and are engaged in a number of activities (i.e., work, eating, drinking, hobbies), which can result in exposure to a wide range of biological, chemical, and physical environmental stressors. Exposures to these stressors are associated with a number of health and comfort effects.

The Department of Environmental Health Sciences (EHS) seeks to produce M.P.H. graduates who are able to recognize and assess the impact of environmental health hazards on human health in the community and occupational setting and to identify a range of options available to reduce exposures to those hazards.

Students in EHS can choose tracks in environmental epidemiology, environmental policy, or risk assessment. Within these tracks there is flexibility for students to design with their adviser a program to meet individual needs. Students take advantage of the wide variety of courses relevant to environmental health offered by the department and throughout the University, particularly those in the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies.

M.P.H. graduates of the EHS department find employment in public agencies at the community, city, state, and federal levels; in pharmaceutical companies in areas such as risk assessment and occupational health and safety; in environmental consulting organizations; and in private sector companies in the area of corporate health and safety. They also take research positions in organizations including the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control, and the Environmental Protection Agency.

Departmental Requirements for the M.P.H. in Environmental Health Sciences

Course number

Course title

Course units

  • CDE 516b
  • Principles of Epidemiology II
  • 1
  • CDE 534b
  • Applied Analytic Methods in Epidemiology
  • 1
  • EHS/CDE 502b
  • Physiology for Public Health
  • 1
  • EHS 503b
  • Introduction to Toxicology
  • 1
  • EHS 507a
  • Environmental Epidemiology
  • 1
  • EHS 508b
  • Assessing Exposures to Environmental Stressors
  • 1
  • EHS 511a
  • Applied Risk Assessment
  • 1
  • EHS 525a
  • Seminar in Environmental Health (two fall terms required)
  • 0
  • EPH 525b
  • Thesis
  • 2

Competencies for the M.P.H in Environmental Health Sciences

Upon receiving an M.P.H. with a concentration in Environmental Health Sciences, the student will be able to:

  • • Discuss the basic principles of how contaminants are introduced into the air, water, soil, and food and then transported through the environment.
  • • Describe the mechanisms of toxicity of biological, chemical, and physical stressors, including absorption, distribution, metabolic transformation, elimination, and genetic susceptibility.
  • • Use epidemiological, toxicological, statistical, and exposure assessment techniques in assessing the risks associated with environmental hazards in the working, residential, and community environments.
  • • Apply the basic principles used to manage risks associated with exposure to environmental hazards.
  • • Review, critique, and evaluate environmental epidemiology research articles.
  • • Evaluate the scientific merit and feasibility of environmental epidemiology study designs.
  • • Synthesize information from a variety of environmental health and related studies.
  • • Coordinate an environmental epidemiology study, with minimal supervision.
  • • Write up and present research findings to professional audiences.

Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases Department

Albert I. Ko, M.D., Chair

Microbial disease epidemiology is the science of the cause, distribution, frequency of, and resistance to infections caused by viruses, parasites, and bacteria, and of the distribution, transmission, and control of these agents.

The M.P.H. curriculum for the Department of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases (EMD) is designed to train the student to understand the epidemiology of the major infectious agents, the diseases they cause, and the host response to those diseases. The interaction of the agent (parasite, bacterium, or virus) with the host and the influence of the environment on both agent and host are studied. The curriculum considers the role of age, immunological response, genetics, natural history of vectors, geographical distribution, and transmission and transport of agents. In addition to epidemiology courses, the department’s faculty teach microbiology courses relating to bacteria, viruses, and parasites—including classification, replication, biochemistry, genetics, immunology, and pathogenesis—essential to the understanding of the epidemiology of microbial disease. Through these experiences the student gains a clear understanding of the quantitative and qualitative biological spectrum of microbial diseases.

Using a problem-solving approach the student learns about surveillance through collection and analysis of data followed by synthesis of information as a basis for public health decisions. The same approach is used to investigate epidemics and to study basic biologic problems.

Emphasis is placed on the application of epidemiological concepts to intervention in transmission cycles and disease progression. Intervention may be accomplished through such measures as vaccination, antimicrobial therapy, vector control, or behavior modification. The student is encouraged to obtain a solid laboratory foundation for diagnosis, for population-based serologic surveys, and for understanding the molecular basis of the disease process and intervention strategies. Third World infectious disease problems and their solutions are considered extensively.

Nearly half of EMD graduates in the M.P.H. program enter public health practice at the local, state, or national level, and a portion of the remainder enter hospital, medical center, or industrial programs. Many students continue graduate and professional education beyond the M.P.H. degree.

Departmental Requirements for the M.P.H. in Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases

Course number

Course title

Course units

  • EMD 512b
  • Immunology for Epidemiologists
  • 1
  • EMD 518a and b
  • Principles of Infectious Diseases I and II
  • 2
  • EMD 525a and b
  • Seminar in Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases
  • 0
  • EPH 525b
  • Thesis
  • 2

One of the following:

  • CDE 516b
  • Principles of Epidemiology II
  • 1
  • CDE 534b
  • Applied Analytic Methods in Epidemiology
  • 1

Students are required to choose at least two additional EMD courses in collaboration with their adviser.

Competencies for the M.P.H. in Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases

Upon receiving an M.P.H. with a concentration in Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, the student will be able to:

  • • Define the scope and worldwide impact of infectious diseases.
  • • Describe the processes that drive transmission and maintenance of infectious agents.
  • • Describe the epidemiology of the major infectious diseases worldwide, as well as risk exposures and behaviors as these relate to transmission.
  • • Describe the host genetic and immunologic factors that affect transmission and disease progression.
  • • Describe pathogen-related determinants that contribute to transmission and disease.
  • • Explain the interrelationship between the environment and the emergence and maintenance of infectious diseases in populations.
  • • Describe and critically evaluate approaches for the prevention and control of infectious diseases and define the issues that are key to their effective use.
  • • Apply principles and concepts obtained through course work to design and implement studies on the etiology, detection, prevention, or control of infectious diseases in the laboratory and field.
  • • Define the ethical challenges in infectious disease research.

Health Policy and Management Department

Susan H. Busch, Ph.D., Chair

The goal of the Department of Health Policy and Management (HPM) is to address the critical issues in improving public health, especially the health of high-risk and vulnerable populations. The department offers two programs: the M.P.H. program in Health Policy and the M.P.H. program in Health Care Management.

Health Policy Program

The specific objectives of the M.P.H. program in Health Policy are: (1) to provide its students with a basic foundation of knowledge in public health, health policy, and health management, and (2) to teach concepts, principles, and scientific skills necessary for health services policy development and evaluation and health management. The program aims to have students develop an understanding of the importance of data and research as policy and management tools. Students are taught to anticipate future needs relative to expanding technology, changing patterns of community health, and emerging societal and programmatic needs.

The program provides a unique, unified approach to policy. It is built on the recognition that issues of health policy cannot be divorced from principles of sound management, nor can health care management or policy be developed without a fundamental understanding of morbidity, mortality, and epidemiologic methods. Further, the program recognizes that leaders cannot make successful decisions about the delivery of health care nor solve the health problems affecting society over the next decades without extensive analytic and decision-making skills. Students need to be able to translate sound scientific evidence into effective health policy. The program emphasizes training in quantitative methods, economics, financing, epidemiology, and evaluative methods for policy and management. Social and behavioral sciences are integral parts of many courses throughout the two-year curriculum.

Students design their own sequence of courses in health policy, and they may also specialize in particular substantive areas (e.g., addiction, health economics, vulnerable populations, global health, or consumer decision making). Students are required to take an integrative seminar in health policy.

Note: Given the sequence in the policy courses and the need to complete a rigorous methods course prior to the second year, transfers into the Health Policy program will not be allowed after the first term unless the student has successfully completed Methods in Health Services Research or Principles of Epidemiology II.

Graduates of the program in Health Policy are employed in both the public and private sectors including federal and state agencies, for-profit and nonprofit health care organizations, hospitals, and private consulting firms, as well as in research.

Departmental Requirements for the M.P.H. in Health Policy

  • Course number
  • Course title
  • Course units
  • HPM 510a
  • Introduction to Health Policy and Health Systems
  • 1
  • HPM 514b
  • Health Politics, Governance, and Policy
  • 1
  • HPM 560b
  • Health Economics and U.S. Health Policy
  • 1
  • HPM 570a
  • Cost-Effectiveness Analysis and Decision Making
  • 1
  • HPM 583b
  • Methods in Health Services Research
  • 1
  • HPM 586a
  • Microeconomics for Health Policy and Health Management
  • 1
  • HPM 597b
  • Capstone Course in Health Policy
  • 1

The thesis is not a requirement in the Health Policy Program.

Competencies for the M.P.H. in Health Policy

Upon receiving an M.P.H. with a concentration in Health Policy, the student will be able to:

  • • Evaluate the efficiency of public policies using economic concepts.
  • • Identify market failures in the market for public health activities and health care.
  • • Conduct decision analysis to evaluate prevention, screening, and treatment alternatives in public health and clinical medicine.
  • • Critically evaluate both the methods and application of cost-effectiveness analysis to inform public health decision making.
  • • Assess statistical findings and empirical literature to enhance policy design and implementation.
  • • Synthesize the research literature, assessing strengths and weaknesses of published findings, to guide evidence-informed policy making.
  • • Describe and assess the historical evolution of how different countries’ systems for financing and delivering health care have evolved and influenced the health of their populations.
  • • Describe the role of the major U.S. political institutions in health policy and politics.
  • • Identify and evaluate different strategies for financing, regulatory, and delivery system reform.
  • • Influence health policy and management decision making.
  • • Understand strategies of media advocacy to effectively reshape public awareness and opinion on health-related issues.
  • • Describe conceptual frameworks for political agenda setting.
  • • Assess how well different governance arrangements and policy designs result in a health care system that is responsive to differences in health needs among subsets of the population.
  • • Describe legal perspectives and institutions that affect health policy and public health, including assessment of legal and regulatory environments in the context of public health.
  • • Understand the ethical distinctions and professional norms associated with different paradigms for policy analysis and their implications for health policy.
  • • Demonstrate written communication skills to effectively communicate in professional health policy and community settings.
  • • Demonstrate oral communication and presentation skills to effectively communicate in professional health policy and community settings.
  • • Demonstrate leadership, team-based collaboration, and management skills.

Health Care Management Program

Howard Forman, M.D., Director

Future health care managers will be involved in a wide range of settings like hospitals, health systems, pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, health maintenance organizations, managed care companies, insurance companies, and consulting. The Health Care Management Program was designed with the realization that both management training and public health training are needed to adequately prepare future leaders in health care management. The Health Care Management Program within the Department of Health Policy and Management provides this training. This program is offered in conjunction with the Yale School of Management (SOM). The management courses at SOM, combined with HPM offerings, and an integrative course in the second year, give students an excellent foundation for work in the field.

Departmental Requirements for the M.P.H. in Health Care Management

  • Course number
  • Course title
  • Course units
  • HPM 510a
  • Introduction to Health Policy and Health Systems
  • 1
  • HPM 561b/MGT 630b
  • Managing Health Care Organizations
  • 1
  • HPM 583b
  • Methods in Health Services Research
  • 1
  • HPM 586a
  • Microeconomics for Health Policy and Health Management
  • 1
  • *MGT 502a
  • Fundamentals of Accounting and Finance
  • 1
  • *MGT 525a
  • Competitive Strategy
  • 1
  • *MGT 535b
  • Managing Strategic Networks (half-term)
  • 0.5
  • *MGT/HPM 698b
  • Health Care Finance, Policy, and Economics
  • 1
  • *MGT/HPM 699a,b
  • Colloquium in Health Care Leadership
  • 0.5
  • *MGT 856b
  • Managing Marketing (half-term)
  • 0.5
  • *MGT 879b
  • Health Care Operations (half-term)
  • 0.5

*These courses are offered in the School of Management.

The thesis is not a requirement in the Health Care Management Program.

Competencies for the M.P.H. in Health Care Management

Upon receiving an M.P.H. with a concentration in Health Care Management, the student will be able to:

  • • Conduct financial analyses, including reading and analyzing financial statements.
  • • Conduct economic analyses, including cost-effectiveness analysis, to inform public health management decision making.
  • • Apply operations management concepts to address organizational performance issues in health service organizations.
  • • Apply the principles of marketing analysis and planning to public health programs and health service organizations.
  • • Utilize statistical analysis skills to conduct health systems and policy research.
  • • Utilize research design and data management skills to conduct health policy and management research.
  • • Evaluate health care financing, regulatory, and delivery systems.
  • • Demonstrate written communication skills to effectively communicate in professional health policy and community settings.
  • • Demonstrate oral communication and presentation skills to effectively communicate in professional health policy and community settings.
  • • Utilize advocacy, persuasion, and negotiation skills to influence health policy and management decision making.
  • • Perform strategic analysis and planning for public health care organizations.
  • • Describe legal perspectives on health policy and management issues, including assessment of legal and regulatory environments in the context of public health.
  • • Apply ethical decision making in a health care context.
  • • Apply management problem-solving skills to improve functioning of organizations and agencies in health systems.
  • • Demonstrate leadership, team-based collaboration, and conflict management skills.
  • • Coach and provide constructive feedback to colleagues.
  • • Work with and incorporate perspectives of culturally diverse groups.

Accelerated M.B.A./M.P.H. Program

The Accelerated M.B.A./M.P.H. Program with YSPH and Yale School of Management will be launched in summer 2014. Further details are available on http://ysph.yale.edu.

Global Health Concentration

Rafael Pérez-Escamilla, Ph.D., Director

Students in the traditional two-year M.P.H. program may complete this concentration while they satisfy the requirements of their respective departments, divisions, or programs. Students must declare in their first term their intent to enroll in this concentration.

The multidisciplinary approach of the Global Health Concentration encourages creativity and innovation, while fostering a global perspective. The concentration emphasizes an integrative problem-solving approach to global health issues and to diseases and conditions that afflict developing and developed countries. Students who complete this concentration will be well prepared for positions in a variety of organizations—public and private, national, bilateral and multilateral—dedicated to global health challenges.

All students in the Global Health Concentration will complete four global health courses. Students will also participate in two terms of the Global Health Seminar (in their first year) and complete a global health internship during the summer between the first and second years of the M.P.H. program. If students have already had 10–12 weeks of international public health experience, they can do an internship based in the United States as long as it is pertinent to global health; otherwise, they must do an internship abroad. Students must write a global health-related thesis or participate in a relevant capstone experience (as determined by their department/division/program).

Requirements for the M.P.H. Global Health Concentration

Course number

  • Course title

Course units

  • EPH 591a and b
  • Global Health Seminar (two terms, taken in the first year)

0

  • EPH 520c
  • Summer Internship (must be global health-related)

0

  • HPM 566b
  • Critical Issues in Global Health

1

Three global health courses selected from at least two of the five perspectives on public health*

3

EPH 525b

  • Thesis (must be global health-related); in lieu of the thesis, students in Health Policy and Health Care Management must complete an appropriate capstone experience

2

*The five perspectives on public health include (1) biomedicine, (2) epidemiology, (3) psychosocial/social and behavioral/anthropology, (4) development/political economy, and (5) ethics/history/humanities. At the beginning of every term, a list of courses offered in each of the five areas will be distributed to students.
Competencies for the M.P.H. Global Health Concentration and the Advanced Professional M.P.H. Program Global Health Track

Each student in the Global Health Concentration will master the core curriculum competencies and the competencies for the student’s department/division/program. In addition, upon receiving an M.P.H. degree in the Global Health Concentration, the student will be able to:

  • • Describe the major causes of morbidity and mortality in the world and in the world’s major regions.
  • • Describe cross-national determinants of health based on courses selected from the five perspectives on public health: biomedicine; epidemiology; psychosocial/social and behavioral/anthropology; development/political economy; and ethics/history/humanities.
  • • Analyze global health problems taking into account their social, political, economic, legal, and human rights dimensions.
  • • Understand the different components of the global health governance infrastructure, and critically assess this infrastructure.
  • • Assess global health issues from an interdisciplinary perspective, including public health disciplines, medicine, international relations, environmental studies, political science, law, anthropology, and others.
  • • Apply necessary leadership skills to serve as bridges between the global health research and practice settings.
  • • Apply research methods in the design, monitoring, and evaluation of global health initiatives.
  • • Explain and propose solutions for the unique challenges involved in conducting public health research in low-resource settings.
  • • Describe and analyze different roles of global public health practitioners and apply this to individual career development.

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B.A.-B.S./M.P.H. Select Program

The Select Program in Public Health gives Yale College students interested in the field of public health the opportunity to earn a bachelor’s degree from Yale College and an M.P.H. degree from the Yale School of Public Health in a five-year joint program. During four years of Yale College enrollment, students will complete a standard Yale College major and six course units applicable toward the M.P.H. Students will complete a public health internship between the fourth and fifth years of the program. They will be at YSPH full-time in their fifth year, during which they will complete the master’s thesis and the remaining ten courses for the master’s degree.

Candidates must present evidence of a commitment to public health, as well as one year of college-level mathematics and either biology, chemistry, or physics. Students may apply to YSPH for the joint program in the fall term of their junior year. Applicants must complete YSPH application forms and must submit transcripts, SAT scores, three letters of recommendation, and a personal statement.

Financial aid, if provided during the fifth year, will come from YSPH. We cannot guarantee that the financial aid award in the fifth year will be equivalent to previous awards.

Further information about this program may be obtained from the Office of Student Affairs, 47 College St., Suite 108, New Haven CT 06510, 203.785.6260, or on the Web at www.publichealth.yale.edu.

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Advanced Professional M.P.H. Program

Mayur M. Desai, M.P.H., Ph.D., Director

The eleven-month Advanced Professional M.P.H. Program provides rigorous public health training to individuals with a doctoral-level degree, or equivalent degree, in a field related to public health (e.g., physicians, dentists, veterinarians, or those with a doctorate in the biological, behavioral, or social sciences) and to medical students who have completed their third year in an accredited medical school in the United States. The program is designed for mature individuals with clear goals in public health. Students can enter the program to gain skills in the public health sciences and to prepare for careers in a variety of settings, including academia; local, national, or international public health agencies; industry; and nonprofit foundations and research organizations. Physicians in preventive medicine, occupational and environmental medicine, and aerospace medicine residency programs can enter the program to complete their M.P.H. degree requirement.

Students concentrate in one of six tracks: Applied Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Social and Behavioral Sciences, Health Policy, Global Health, Preventive Medicine, or Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The program begins with an intensive seven-week summer session, followed by two full-time terms of study. All requirements must be completed within three years of the date of matriculation.

Curriculum for the Advanced Professional M.P.H. Program

Applied Biostatistics and Epidemiology Track
Core Requirements
  • Course number
  • Course title
  • Course units
  • BIS 515c
  • Accelerated Biostatistics
  • 2
  • CDE 505c
  • Accelerated Social and Behavioral Foundations of Health
  • 1
  • CDE 515c
  • Accelerated Epidemiology
  • 1
  • EPH 100a
  • Professional Skills Seminar
  • 0
  • EPH 515b
  • Introduction to Research and Professional Ethics Seminar
  • 0
  • One of the following:
  • HPM 510a
  • Introduction to Health Policy and Health Systems
  • 1
  • HPM 560b
  • Health Economics and U.S. Health Policy
  • 1
  • One of the following:
  • EHS 503b
  • Introduction to Toxicology
  • 1
  • EHS 507a
  • Environmental Epidemiology
  • 1
  • EHS 510a
  • Contemporary Issues in Environmental Health
  • 1
  • EHS 511a
  • Applied Risk Assessment
  • 1
  • EHS 575a
  • Introduction to Occupational and Environmental Medicine
  • 1
  • One of the following:
  • EPH 500b
  • Public Health Practicum
  • 1
  • EPH 542b
  • Community Health Program Planning
  • 1
Track Requirements
  • CDE 534b
  • Applied Analytic Methods in Epidemiology
  • 1
  • One of the following:
  • BIS 540a
  • Fundamentals of Clinical Trials
  • 1
  • CDE 650a
  • Introduction to Evidence-Based Medicine and Health Care
  • 1
  • Two course units from the following:
  • BIS 623a
  • Applied Regression Analysis
  • 1
  • BIS 625a
  • Categorical Data Analysis
  • 1
  • BIS 628b
  • Longitudinal and Multilevel Data Analysis
  • 1
  • BIS 630b
  • Applied Survival Analysis (half-term)
  • 0.5
  • BIS 632b
  • Design and Analysis of Epidemiologic Studies (half-term)
  • 0.5
  • Two additional biostatistics and/or epidemiology courses (list published each fall)
  • 2
  • Capstone course:
  • CDE 617b
  • Developing a Research Proposal
  • 1

Social and Behavioral Sciences Track
Core Requirements
  • Course number
  • Course title
  • Course units
  • BIS 515c
  • Accelerated Biostatistics
  • 2
  • CDE 505c
  • Accelerated Social and Behavioral Foundations of Health
  • 1
  • CDE 515c
  • Accelerated Epidemiology
  • 1
  • EPH 100a
  • Professional Skills Seminar
  • 0
  • EPH 515b
  • Introduction to Research and Professional Ethics Seminar
  • 0

One of the following:

  • HPM 510a
  • Introduction to Health Policy and Health Systems
  • 1
  • HPM 560b
  • Health Economics and U.S. Health Policy
  • 1
  • One of the following:
  • EHS 503b
  • Introduction to Toxicology
  • 1
  • EHS 507a
  • Environmental Epidemiology
  • 1
  • EHS 510a
  • Contemporary Issues in Environmental Health
  • 1
  • EHS 511a
  • Applied Risk Assessment
  • 1
  • EHS 575a
  • Introduction to Occupational and Environmental Medicine
  • 1
  • One of the following:
  • EPH 500b
  • Public Health Practicum
  • 1
  • EPH 542b
  • Community Health Program Planning
  • 1
Track Requirements
  • CDE 534b
  • Applied Analytic Methods in Epidemiology
  • 1
  • CDE 577b
  • Interdisciplinary Research Methods in the Social and Behavioral Sciences
  • 1
  • Two of the following (or permission of academic adviser to substitute):
  • CDE 531a
  • Health and Aging
  • 1
  • CDE 545b
  • Health Disparities by Race and Social Class
  • 1
  • CDE 571b
  • Psychosocial and Behavioral Epidemiology
  • 1
  • CDE 572a
  • Obesity Prevention and Lifestyle Interventions
  • 1
  • CDE 573a
  • Social and Cultural Factors in Mental Health and Illness
  • 1
  • CDE 575b
  • Religion, Health, and Society
  • 1
  • CDE 594a
  • Maternal-Child Public Health Nutrition
  • 1
  • CDE 676b
  • Questionnaire Development
  • 1
  • One of the following capstone courses:
  • CDE 574b
  • Developing a Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Intervention
  • 1
  • CDE 617b
  • Developing a Research Proposal
  • 1

Health Policy Track
Core Requirements
  • Course number
  • Course title
  • Course units
  • BIS 515c
  • Accelerated Biostatistics
  • 2
  • CDE 505c
  • Accelerated Social and Behavioral Foundations of Health
  • 1
  • CDE 515c
  • Accelerated Epidemiology
  • 1
  • EPH 100a
  • Professional Skills Seminar
  • 0
  • EPH 515b
  • Introduction to Research and Professional Ethics Seminar
  • 0
  • One of the following:
  • EHS 503b
  • Introduction to Toxicology
  • 1
  • EHS 507a
  • Environmental Epidemiology
  • 1
  • EHS 510a
  • Contemporary Issues in Environmental Health
  • 1
  • EHS 511a
  • Applied Risk Assessment
  • 1
  • EHS 575a
  • Introduction to Occupational and Environmental Medicine
  • 1
  • One of the following:
  • EPH 500b
  • Public Health Practicum
  • 1
  • EPH 542b
  • Community Health Program Planning
  • 1
  • HPM 555a/b
  • Health Policy and Health Care Management Practicum
  • 1
Track Requirements
  • HPM 510a
  • Introduction to Health Policy and Health Systems
  • 1
  • HPM 514b
  • Health Politics, Governance, and Policy
  • 1
  • HPM 570a
  • Cost-Effectiveness Analysis and Decision Making
  • 1
  • HPM 583b
  • Methods in Health Services Research
  • 1
  • HPM 586a
  • Microeconomics for Health Policy and Health Management
  • 1
  • One additional Health Policy and Management course
  • 1
  • One of the following capstone courses:
  • HPM 561b
  • Managing Health Care Organizations
  • 1
  • HPM 597b
  • Capstone Course in Health Policy
  • 1

Global Health Track
Core Requirements
  • Course number
  • Course title
  • Course units
  • BIS 515c
  • Accelerated Biostatistics
  • 2
  • CDE 505c
  • Accelerated Social and Behavioral Foundations of Health
  • 1
  • CDE 515c
  • Accelerated Epidemiology
  • 1
  • EPH 100a
  • Professional Skills Seminar
  • 0
  • EPH 515b
  • Introduction to Research and Professional Ethics Seminar
  • 0
  • One of the following:
  • HPM 510a
  • Introduction to Health Policy and Health Systems
  • 1
  • HPM 560b
  • Health Economics and U.S. Health Policy
  • 1
  • One of the following:
  • EHS 503b
  • Introduction to Toxicology
  • 1
  • EHS 507a
  • Environmental Epidemiology
  • 1
  • EHS 510a
  • Contemporary Issues in Environmental Health
  • 1
  • EHS 511a
  • Applied Risk Assessment
  • 1
  • EHS 575a
  • Introduction to Occupational and Environmental Medicine
  • 1
  • One of the following:
  • EPH 500b
  • Public Health Practicum
  • 1
  • EPH 542b
  • Community Health Program Planning
  • 1
Track Requirements
  • EPH 591a and b
  • Global Health Seminar
  • 0
  • HPM 566b
  • Critical Issues in Global Health
  • 1

Three Global Health courses from at least two of the five perspectives on public health (list of courses published each fall)

  • 3
  • One of the following capstone courses:
  • CDE 617b
  • Developing a Research Proposal
  • 1
  • HPM 561b
  • Managing Health Care Organizations
  • 1
  • HPM 597b
  • Capstone Course in Health Policy
  • 1

Preventive Medicine Track

Core Requirements

Course number

Course title

Course units

  • BIS 515c
  • Accelerated Biostatistics
  • 2
  • CDE 505c
  • Accelerated Social and Behavioral Foundations of Health
  • 1
  • CDE 515c
  • Accelerated Epidemiology
  • 1
  • EHS 575a
  • Introduction to Occupational and Environmental Medicine
  • 1
  • EPH 100a
  • Professional Skills Seminar
  • 0
  • EPH 515b
  • Introduction to Research and Professional Ethics Seminar
  • 0
  • One of the following:
  • HPM 510a
  • Introduction to Health Policy and Health Systems
  • 1
  • HPM 560b
  • Health Economics and U.S. Health Policy
  • 1
  • One of the following:
  • EPH 500b
  • Public Health Practicum
  • 1
  • EPH 542b
  • Community Health Program Planning
  • 1
Track Requirements
  • CDE 534b
  • Applied Analytic Methods in Epidemiology
  • 1
  • One of the following:
  • CDE 541a
  • Community Health Program Evaluation
  • 1
  • CDE 562a
  • Nutrition and Chronic Disease
  • 1
  • CDE 572a
  • Obesity Prevention and Lifestyle Interventions
  • 1
  • One of the following:
  • BIS 538b
  • Survey Sampling: Methods and Management
  • 1
  • BIS 540a
  • Fundamentals of Clinical Trials
  • 1
  • CDE 650a
  • Introduction to Evidence-Based Medicine and Health Care
  • 1
  • One of the following:
  • EHS 511a
  • Applied Risk Assessment
  • 1
  • EHS 573b
  • Epidemiological Issues in Occupational and Environmental Medicine
  • 1
  • EHS 581a
  • Medical and Public Health Emergency Planning and Operations
  • 1
  • One of the following capstone courses:
  • CDE 574b
  • Developing a Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Intervention
  • 1
  • CDE 617b
  • Developing a Research Proposal
  • 1
Occupational and Environmental Medicine Track (Yale OEM Fellows)
Core Requirements
  • Course number
  • Course title
  • Course units
  • BIS 505a
  • Introduction to Statistical Thinking I
  • 1
  • BIS 505b
  • Introduction to Statistical Thinking II
  • 1
  • CDE/EMD 508a
  • Principles of Epidemiology I
  • 1
  • EHS 503b
  • Introduction to Toxicology
  • 1
  • EPH 100a
  • Professional Skills Seminar
  • 0
  • EPH 515b
  • Introduction to Research and Professional Ethics Seminar
  • 0
  • One of the following:
  • CDE 505a
  • Social and Behavioral Foundations of Health
  • 1
  • CDE 571b
  • Psychosocial and Behavioral Epidemiology
  • 1
  • One of the following:
  • HPM 510a
  • Introduction to Health Policy and Health Systems
  • 1
  • HPM 560b
  • Health Economics and U.S. Health Policy
  • 1
Track Requirements
  • EHS 505a
  • Fundamentals of Occupational Hygiene, Safety, and Ergonomics
  • 1
  • EHS 507a
  • Environmental Epidemiology
  • 1
  • EHS 511a
  • Applied Risk Assessment
  • 1
  • EHS 573b
  • Epidemiological Issues in Occupational and Environmental Medicine
  • 1
  • EHS 575a
  • Introduction to Occupational and Environmental Medicine
  • 1
  • EPH 525b
  • Thesis
  • 2

Note: Yale Occupational and Environmental Medicine Fellows may count their practicum year, accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, as the required practice experience for the M.P.H. program.

Occupational and Environmental Medicine Track (11-Month Students)

Core Requirements

Course number

Course title

Course units

  • BIS 515c
  • Accelerated Biostatistics
  • 2
  • CDE 505c
  • Accelerated Social and Behavioral Foundations of Health
  • 1
  • CDE 515c
  • Accelerated Epidemiology
  • 1
  • EHS 503b
  • Introduction to Toxicology
  • 1
  • EPH 100a
  • Professional Skills Seminar
  • 0
  • EPH 515b
  • Introduction to Research and Professional Ethics Seminar
  • 0
  • One of the following:
  • HPM 510a
  • Introduction to Health Policy and Health Systems
  • 1
  • HPM 560b
  • Health Economics and U.S. Health Policy
  • 1
  • One of the following:
  • EPH 500b
  • Public Health Practicum
  • 1
  • EPH 542b
  • Community Health Program Planning
  • 1
Track Requirements
  • EHS 505a
  • Fundamentals of Occupational Hygiene, Safety, and Ergonomics
  • 1
  • EHS 511a
  • Applied Risk Assessment
  • 1
  • EHS 573b
  • Epidemiological Issues in Occupational and Environmental Medicine
  • 1
  • EHS 575a
  • Introduction to Occupational and Environmental Medicine
  • 1
  • One of the following capstone courses:
  • CDE 574b
  • Developing a Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Intervention
  • 1
  • CDE 617b
  • Developing a Research Proposal
  • 1

Competencies for the Advanced Professional M.P.H. Program

Core Curriculum

Upon completing the core curriculum of the M.P.H. program, the student will be able to:

  • • Demonstrate a knowledge base in the disciplines of biostatistics, chronic and infectious disease epidemiology, health systems, public policy, social and behavioral sciences, and environmental health.
  • • Apply basic research skills to specific public health problems in both group and individual settings, including the ability to define problems; construct, articulate, and test hypotheses; draw conclusions; and communicate findings to a variety of audiences.
  • • Explain the interrelationships among a multitude of factors that can impact a public health problem, including scientific, medical, environmental, cultural, social, behavioral, economic, political, and ethical factors.
  • • Review, critique, and evaluate public health reports and research articles.
  • • Apply public health concepts, principles, and methodologies obtained through formal course work to actual problems experienced in the community or work environment.
  • • Critically evaluate programs, interventions, and outcomes that relate to public health practice.
  • • Apply ethical standards and professional values as they relate to the practice of public health.
  • • Demonstrate sensitivity to the social context within which public health professionals practice.
Applied Biostatistics & Epidemiology Track

Upon receiving an M.P.H. degree in the Advanced Professional M.P.H. Program, with a concentration in Applied Biostatistics and Epidemiology, the student will be able to:

  • • Describe intermediate to advanced concepts of random variation and commonly used statistical probability distributions.
  • • Develop an efficient design for collecting, recording, and storing data collected in the conduct of public health and medical research.
  • • Design efficient computer programs for study management, statistical analysis, as well as presentation using SAS and other programming languages.
  • • Produce edited data sets suitable for statistical analyses.
  • • Produce working tables and statistical summaries describing research in health science.
  • • Evaluate the scientific merit and feasibility of epidemiologic study designs.
  • • Describe the epidemiology of common chronic diseases.
  • • Synthesize information from a variety of epidemiologic and related studies.
  • • Design and carry out epidemiologic studies, with minimal supervision.
  • • Analyze data and draw appropriate inferences from epidemiologic studies at an intermediate to advanced level, using a variety of analytical tools.
  • • Write an NIH-type epidemiologic research proposal.
  • • Identify, interpret, and use routinely collected data on disease occurrence.
  • • Review, critique, and evaluate epidemiologic reports and research articles, as well as the broader health sciences literature, at an intermediate level, using principles of epidemiology and biostatistics.
  • • Develop written presentations based on intermediate to advanced statistical and epidemiologic analyses for both public health professionals and educated lay audiences.
Social & Behavioral Sciences Track

Upon receiving an M.P.H. degree in the Advanced Professional M.P.H. Program, with a concentration in Social and Behavioral Sciences, the student will be able to:

  • • Identify the effects of social, psychological, and behavioral factors on individual and population health, including prevention, treatment and management of chronic disease, adjustment to illness, adherence to treatment regimens, and promotion of recovery.
  • • Analyze health from multiple levels, including the individual, the social group, and society.
  • • Critically evaluate and interpret the public health scientific literature as presented in professional journals and the popular media, including descriptive, analytic, and intervention studies.
  • • Construct research hypotheses and design a study to test these hypotheses.
  • • Apply social, psychological, and behavioral theory in the design, implementation, and evaluation of prevention interventions aimed toward: (a) decreasing health-damaging behaviors (e.g., risky sex); (b) increasing health-promoting behaviors (e.g., exercise); and (c) increasing psychosocial well-being (e.g., coping with chronic illness).
  • • Design an intervention aimed at changing a particular health behavior or preventing a disease.
  • • Develop procedures and training materials to implement effective behavioral interventions.
  • • Describe how culture, social inequities, and biology influence health across the lifespan.
  • • Identify ways to address health inequalities and promote health equity.
  • • Describe the appropriate statistical analyses to examine different types of research questions in the social and behavioral sciences.
  • • Demonstrate oral and written communication and presentation skills to effectively communicate and disseminate results to various professional and community audiences.
  • • Explain the dynamic interaction between policies and the social and behavioral sciences.
  • • Apply the ethical principles involved in social and behavioral sciences as they relate to public health.
  • • Write an NIH-type research proposal.
Health Policy Track

Upon receiving an M.P.H. degree in the Advanced Professional M.P.H. Program, with a concentration in Health Policy, the student will be able to:

  • • Apply the principles of microeconomics (e.g., markets and market failure) in a health policy context.
  • • Conduct economic analysis, including cost-effectiveness analysis, to inform public health decision making.
  • • Describe and assess the historical evolution of the U.S. health care system.
  • • Describe the role of the major U.S. political institutions in health policy and politics.
  • • Utilize statistical analysis skills to conduct health systems and policy research.
  • • Utilize research design and data management skills to conduct health policy and management research.
  • • Evaluate health care financing, regulatory, and delivery systems.
  • • Demonstrate written communication skills to effectively communicate in professional health policy and community settings.
  • • Demonstrate oral communication and presentation skills to effectively communicate in professional health policy and community settings.
  • • Describe conceptual frameworks for political agenda setting.
  • • Perform strategic analysis and planning for public health care organizations.
  • • Evaluate health policies in terms of efficiency, efficacy, equity, and feasibility.
  • • Describe legal perspectives on health policy and management issues, including assessment of legal and regulatory environments in the context of public health.
  • • Apply ethical decision making in a health care context.
  • • Demonstrate leadership, team-based collaboration, and management skills.
  • • Work with and incorporate the perspectives of culturally diverse groups.
Global Health Track

Upon receiving an M.P.H. degree in the Advanced Professional M.P.H. Program, with a concentration in Global Health, the student will be able to:

  • • Describe the major causes of morbidity and mortality in the world and in the world’s major regions.
  • • Describe the epidemiology, transmission, and pathogenesis of global infectious diseases, including neglected tropical diseases.
  • • Apply burden of disease measures to the analysis of global health disparities.
  • • Explain the causes of global health disparities.
  • • Review methods available to control each of the world’s major diseases.
  • • Evaluate which disease control measures would be most appropriate for a given setting.
  • • Describe cross-national determinants of health, including globalization, international trade policy, practices of multinational corporations, urbanization, migration, international conflict, and environmental change.
  • • Analyze global health problems, taking into account their social, political, economic, legal, and human rights dimensions.
  • • Critically assess the global health governance infrastructure and analyze alternative approaches for health care delivery, regulation, and financing.
  • • Apply relevant concepts and theories to policy and management challenges faced by health systems in low-, middle-, and high-income countries.
  • • Assess global health issues from an interdisciplinary perspective, including public health disciplines, medicine, international relations, environmental studies, political science, law, anthropology, and others.
  • • Apply necessary leadership skills to serve as bridges between the global health research and practice settings.
  • • Apply quantitative and qualitative research methods to global health issues.
  • • Explain and propose solutions for the unique challenges involved in conducting public health research in low-resource settings.
Preventive Medicine Track

Upon receiving an M.P.H. degree in the Advanced Professional M.P.H. Program, with a concentration in Preventive Medicine, the student will be able to:

  • • Evaluate the scientific merit and feasibility of epidemiologic study designs.
  • • Construct research hypotheses and design a study to test these hypotheses.
  • • Synthesize information from a variety of epidemiologic and related studies.
  • • Describe the appropriate statistical analyses to examine different types of epidemiologic and social and behavioral research questions.
  • • Identify, interpret, and use routinely collected data on disease occurrence.
  • • Review, critique, and evaluate epidemiologic reports and research articles at an intermediate level.
  • • Write an NIH-type research proposal.
  • • Apply social, psychological, and behavioral theory in the design, implementation, and evaluation of prevention interventions.
  • • Describe the role of health behavior in disease.
  • • Evaluate and interpret health behavior change interventions.
  • • Review, interpret, and evaluate epidemiologic reports and research articles pertaining to occupational and environmental risk factors.
  • • Review, interpret, and evaluate toxicological reports and research articles pertaining to occupational and environmental risk factors.
  • • Synthesize complex data sources about occupational and environmental hazards to make inferences about human risk.
Occupational & Environmental Medicine Track

Upon receiving an M.P.H. degree in the Advanced Professional M.P.H. Program, with a concentration in Occupational and Environmental Medicine, the student will be able to:

  • • Evaluate the scientific merit and feasibility of occupational and environmental health study designs.
  • • Describe and apply alternative strategies for assessment of occupational and environmental exposures.
  • • Design and conduct an occupational/environmental health study, with minimal supervision.
  • • Review, interpret, and evaluate epidemiologic reports and research articles pertaining to occupational and environmental risk factors.
  • • Review, interpret, and evaluate toxicological reports and research articles pertaining to occupational and environmental risk factors.
  • • Synthesize complex data sources about occupational and environmental hazards to make inferences about human risk.
  • • Evaluate work, home, and other environments for potential hazardous exposures.
  • • Utilize industrial hygiene principles to develop a plan to evaluate and control workplace hazards.
  • • Communicate occupational and environmental health information to employers, workers, professional audiences, and the general public, orally and in writing.

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