Yale University.Calendar.Directories.

Courses

501, Issues in Nursing 1.5 credit hours. This course explores personal and professional issues affecting the ability of a nurse to deliver professional nursing care. Content includes ethical, legal, cultural, and other policy-related aspects of nursing practice. Required of all students in the prespecialty year. R. Krause

503, Biomedical Foundations of Health and Disease 6 credit hours. This course is offered in the fall/spring terms of the first GEPN year. Lectures focus on the basic scientific principles of physiology and include an introduction to pathophysiology. Anatomical, biochemical, and developmental features are involved in discussion of the inseparable structural-functional relations within the human body. Topics include physiology, biochemistry, immunology, genetics, introductory embryology, and microbiology. In addition, the course addresses topics introduced in 516a and 517a. Required of all students in the prespecialty year. W. Zawalich

504, Health Assessment I 3 credit hours. This course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skills needed to conduct a comprehensive health history and physical examination across the life span for the professional registered nurse (R.N.). Emphasis is on the assessment of physical, developmental, psychosocial (cognitive, affective, and behavioral), cultural, and spiritual dimensions of the client and/or families, as well as factors that influence behavioral responses to health and illness. Required of all students in the prespecialty year. D. Fahs

507, Nutrition: From Clinical Practice to Policy Implications 1.5 credit hours. Proper nutrition is essential for optimal health, and translating this knowledge clinically is essential for clinical practice. Recognizing that complex forces affect how we eat, this course also examines policy issues that impact nutrition, with the ultimate goal of preparing graduate nurses who can effectively plan and manage the nutritional care for patients as they develop skills in changing environment/policy to facilitate positive patient care outcomes. Required of all students in the prespecialty year. Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity faculty; M. Gargiulo

509, Introduction to Drug Therapy 3 credit hours. This course is offered in the fall/spring terms of the first GEPN year. The lectures focus on the appropriate clinical use of drugs. Emphasis is placed on pharmacology, side effects, pharmacokinetics, drug interactions, and the therapeutic use of medications across the populations. Required of all students in the prespecialty year. Integrated throughout the curriculum in the pre­specialty year. L. Meland

511a, Clinical Applications of Human Anatomy 2 credit hours. The effective assessment, diagnosis, and management of disease depend on knowledge of the structures of human beings. This introductory course reviews and discusses the structure and function of the major body systems. The aim of the course is to combine clinically relevant anatomical information with performance of clinical skills that will form the basis of clinical reasoning. Correlation of anatomical knowledge with clinical presentation both in the classroom and in the laboratory is emphasized. Required of all students in the prespecialty year. L. Pellico, W. Stewart, S. Kapadia

513c, Community Health Nursing and Public Health 4 credit hours. This course explores the multidisciplinary theoretical foundations that are the basis for community health nursing practice. Community health nurses provide preventive, therapeutic, rehabilitation, and hospice services across the life span. The clinical experience focuses on the delivery of these health services in community organizations. A community-as-partner assessment and diagnosis project, which culminates in identification of a community health problem and potential solutions, augments core seminar content. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis only. Required of all students in the prespecialty year. M. Ordway

514b or c, Clinical Practice in Maternal-Newborn Nursing 2 credit hours. This course focuses on clinical practice essential to nursing care of women, newborns, and their families throughout the childbearing cycle and the neonatal period. Clinical settings include hospital and ambulatory care. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis only. Required of all students in the prespecialty year. A. Shorten

515b or c, Seminar in Maternal-Newborn Nursing 2 credit hours. This course presents theory essential to the provision of nursing care to childbearing families throughout the childbearing cycle, the neonatal period, and the pre- and inter-conceptional phases. Application of the nursing process as it relates to the promotion, maintenance, and restoration of health is emphasized. Required of all students in the prespecialty year. A. Shorten

516a, Clinical Practice in Medical-Surgical Nursing 4 credit hours. This course focuses on the scientific principles, psychomotor techniques, and communication skills fundamental to nursing practice. Sociocultural variations influencing patient care are introduced. Faculty guide small groups of students in individually planned clinical experiences that provide opportunities to use the nursing process in caring for the hospitalized adult with selected pathophysiological problems. Experience also includes weekly clinical conferences and selected observational experiences. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis only. Required of all students in the prespecialty year. Clinical experience twelve hours per week. L. Pellico

517a, Seminar in Medical-Surgical Nursing 4 credit hours. This course focuses on the dynamic relationship between physical and psychosocial responses to pathophysiological problems occurring in the hospitalized adult and older adults. Application of the nursing process as it relates to the promotion, maintenance, and restoration of health is emphasized. Required of all students in the prespecialty year. L. Pellico, D. Fahs

518b or c, Clinical Practice in Pediatric Nursing 2 credit hours. Utilizing a family-centered approach, this course provides clinical experience in identifying and assessing children’s physiological and developmental needs, and planning, implementing, and evaluating a plan of nursing care to meet the needs of a particular child and his/her family in health care settings. Students have opportunities to use principles of growth and development, knowledge of the child’s and family’s physical and emotional responses to illness, and principles of pediatric nursing in caring for children and their families. The student gains skill and knowledge in the nursing role and an appreciation for the importance of utilizing research findings in practice and collaborating with other health professionals. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis only. Required of all students in the prespecialty year. B. Groth

519b or c, Seminar in Pediatric Nursing 2 credit hours. This course presents theory essential to promote health and adaptation to illness for children and their families. Emphasis is placed on growth and development, as well as pathophysiological, social, environmental, and cultural factors that influence children’s and families’ response to health and illness. Required of all students in the prespecialty year. B. Groth

520b, Clinical Practice in Psychiatric–Mental Health Nursing 2 credit hours. This course builds on skills learned in medical-surgical nursing by providing clinical experience in assessing, planning, implementing, and evaluating a plan of nursing care to meet the unique needs of patients with acute and chronic psychiatric disabilities across the life span. Students gain skills in the use of therapeutic communication, working with the interdisciplinary team, and implementing all phases of the nurse-patient relationship while applying concepts taught in 521b. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis only. Required of all students in the prespecialty year. R. Krause

521b, Seminar in Psychiatric–Mental Health Nursing 2 credit hours. In combination with 520b, this seminar provides the foundations of understanding and treating psychiatric disabilities within a bio-psycho-social-spiritual-cultural-theoretical framework of health promotion and disease prevention related to both mental health and mental illness. Course content includes the pathophysiology, assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation of cognitive, perceptual, emotional, behavioral, and interpersonal symptoms associated with common psychiatric diagnoses for individuals with mental illness and their families across the life span. Students analyze the economic, legal, and ethical issues that influence care in a variety of settings. Four hours per week, first half of spring term. R. Krause

525a, Nursing Research as a Basis for Evidence-Based Practice 2 credit hours. This course expands students’ critical abilities and knowledge by providing an introduction to the research methodologies essential to providing evidence-based advanced nursing care to diverse populations within a variety of settings. This course also examines the strengths and challenges of the evidence-based model as a guide for clinical practice. Students acquire the basic competencies necessary to identify, read, evaluate, and interpret findings from nursing and other relevant research studies to identify knowledge and information related to clinical practice. Students also are expected to utilize these competencies to ensure better-quality health care for all people. J. Taylor

529a, Statistics for Clinical Nursing Research 2 credit hours. This course presents the descriptive and inferential techniques most commonly used in nursing studies. The emphasis is on the conceptualization of the technique and the ability to select the appropriate technique to answer a research question or test a hypothesis. An additional emphasis is on the interpretation of statistical analyses in articles reporting research findings to enhance evidence-based practice. Required in the first year of specialization. M. Funk

533a, Advanced Pathophysiology 3 credit hours. This course provides students with advanced physiologic and pathophysiologic concepts central to understanding maintenance of health and the prevention and management of disease across the life span. Content on cellular function, genetics, immunology, inflammation, infection, and stress and adaptation provides the framework on which further specialty content knowledge is built. Current research, case studies, and application to advanced nursing practice are highlighted. This is a core course. Required of all advanced practice master’s students. Faculty

550, Clinical Applications for Advanced Health Assessment 0.27 credit hours. This course provides the adult/gerontology acute care and family nurse practitioner student the opportunity to explore and apply skills obtained in 554a. Through direct patient interaction with an older adult patient, the student hones health history and physical exam skills and develops critical thinking utilizing clinical decision-making skills necessary to provide competent and safe patient care. Family nurse practitioner students also conduct examinations of the newborn. Required of adult/gerontology acute care and family nurse practitioner specialty students. First term taken concurrently with 554a; students must be in good standing in 554a prior to beginning 550 clinical work. Twelve hours of direct patient care clinical experience. Faculty

554a, Advanced Health Assessment across the Life Span 3.1 credit hours. This course is designed to cover the comprehensive history-taking and advanced physical examination skills requisite of advanced nursing practice/midwifery. Through lecture and laboratory sessions students learn evidence-based assessment techniques, culturally responsive assessment data collection, and application of appropriate technology in health assessment, and they practice comprehensive health histories and physical examinations on each other and/or in the simulation laboratory. Normal and abnormal variations across the life span are represented. Required of students in the first year of specialization in the adult/gerontology acute care, family, midwifery/women’s health, pediatric, and psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner specialties. Three hours of didactic (fifteen weeks) and three hours of laboratory practice (eleven weeks) per week. C. Bruno

555b, Advanced Concepts in Older Adult Care 3 credit hours. This didactic course focuses on health promotion, disease and disability prevention, and the differential diagnosis and management of common health conditions in the gerontology patient across acute care, long-term care, and primary care settings. Additionally, the role of the gerontology nurse practitioner in the comprehensive management of chronic conditions is explored. Required of adult/gerontology acute care nurse practitioner students. Prerequisite: successful completion of 525a, 550, 554a, and 723a. O. Empleo-Frazier

556b, Clinical Practice for Family and Midwidery/Women’s Health Nurse Practitioners 3.2–5.8 credit hours. Course content includes clinical practice in health assessment and the provision of primary and focused health care. Students meet weekly for a one-and-one-half-hour clinical seminar that is held concurrently with clinical practice. Clinical seminar serves as a forum for students to present and discuss cases and explore issues encountered in clinical practice. Required of students in the first year of specialization in the family and midwifery/women’s health nurse practitioner specialties. Clinical seminar discussions for family nurse practitioner students focus on providing care for patients across the life span. Clinical seminar discussions for midwifery/women’s health students focus on providing care for patients from adolescence to senescence. Prerequisite: successful completion of all required courses in the fall term of the first specialty year. Taken concurrently with 557b and, for family nurse practitioner students, with 635b. Eight to sixteen hours of clinical practice (fifteen weeks) and one and one-half hours of clinical conference per week. C. Bruno

557a, Primary Care Problems of Adults I 2 credit hours. This is the first of four didactic courses designed to enable students to develop the necessary knowledge base and problem-solving skills for primary care practice as nurse practitioners. Classes focus on health promotion, disease prevention, differential diagnoses, and evidence-based management of common health conditions in diverse populations of patients from adolescence to senescence. Required of students in the family and midwifery/women’s health nurse practitioner specialties. Prerequisite (or concurrent with): 554a. I. Alexander

557b, Primary Care Problems of Adults I 2 credit hours. This is the second of four didactic courses designed to enable students to gain the problem-solving and clinical strategies necessary for primary care practice as nurse practitioners; it builds upon content taught in 557a. Classes focus on health promotion, disease prevention, differential diagnoses, and evidence-based management of common health conditions for diverse populations of patients from adolescence to senescence. Required of students in the family and midwifery/women’s health nurse practitioner specialties. Taken concurrently with 556b or 580b. Prerequisite: successful completion of 550, 554a, and 557a. I. Alexander

561a, Health Policy and Politics 3 credit hours. This online course (with monthly on-campus sessions) provides students with a historical, current, and essential knowledge of health care policy. The emphasis is on understanding the U.S. health care system and the impact it has on access, cost, and quality of health care, including the health care workforce. The goal is to provide students with the knowledge and skills to become a credible, informed, and influential voice and full partner in the health policy discussions and efforts to redesign and improve U.S. health care systems. Topics covered include: the structure and process of policy making; the legislative and regulatory process; health care economics and payment systems; quality; the uninsured and the history of reform efforts; politics and advocacy; the role of research; and the workforce. These issues are largely taught from a federal policy lens, although state-based health policy is addressed. Students are expected to apply this knowledge to a policy analysis of an issue related to their practice. Required of students in the nursing management, policy, and leadership specialty; open to others with permission of the instructor. No prerequisites. M. Moss

[563a, Quality Improvement and Patient Safety 3 credit hours. This course provides the student with a comprehensive understanding of the field of patient safety and its relationship to overall improvement in the quality of health care. The course explores principles of creating and leading a high-reliability health care system focused on patient safety. A particular emphasis is placed on leadership characteristics essential to creating and sustaining a culture of safety within the health care organization. Web-based format with monthly on-campus sessions. Required of students in the nursing management, policy, and leadership specialty; open to others with permission of the instructor. Not offered in 2013–2014]

565b, Leadership in Health Care Organizations 4 credit hours. The purpose of this course is to assist students in learning what it means to be a leader in multiple health care contexts and playing many organizational roles. The course addresses practices of exemplary leadership; the critical importance of context as a determinant of the leadership challenge; organizational systems dynamics and the underlying role of organizational culture in shaping interactions and behavior; the transition from “doing the work” to “working through others”; and leadership as a lifelong process of self-development. The course utilizes online and intensive in-class instructional methods enabling students to learn about the attributes and behaviors associated with leadership and to identify and cultivate their own leadership capabilities. Required of students in the nursing management, policy, and leadership specialty; open to others with permission of the instructor. Includes a three-day intensive workshop format (twenty-seven hours) combined with thirty-three hours of online instruction spread throughout the term. J. Krauss

567a, Uses of Data in Decision Making 3 credit hours. This course provides content needed to understand, access, mine, and create data for clinical, operational, and financial decision making. Lectures, integrative class sessions, remote access assignments, and other analytic assignments form the basis for learning data elements and structures of administrative databases, data analytic strategies, and the relationship between data and decision making. Combination of four half-day on-site sessions with online teaching; total equivalent to forty-five class hours. Required of students in the nursing management, policy, and leadership specialty; open to nonmatriculated YSN students with permission of the instructor. Web-based instruction with monthly on-campus sessions. D. Diers, K. Hendrickson

[569a, Health Care Ethics: Theory and Practice 3 credit hours. This course explores dilemmas in health care in their professional, clinical, organizational, and public policy contexts. Participants examine influential theoretical approaches to health care ethics, and how these theories are applied within and influenced by the cultural contexts of professions, clinical settings, institutions, communities, and policy making. Students learn how to draw on ethical theory in analyzing moral dilemmas arising in various health care contexts with particular emphasis on cultural competence. The nurse’s perspective on health care ethics, as clinician, administrator, investigator, and advocate, is highlighted through readings, writing assignments, and case study discussions. The course is taught in four monthly three-hour on-campus sessions combined with a total of thirty-three hours of Web-based instruction. Required of students in the nursing management, policy, and leadership specialty in the first year; open to others with permission of the instructor. Not offered in 2013–2014]

[573b, Project Planning, Management, and Implementation 2 credit hours. This course introduces students to the planning, implementation, and management of projects in institutional, community, and policy settings. Students are taught the process of translating ideas into measureable outcomes. The course familiarizes students with concepts and practices of executive-level project planning and implementation in support of organizational strategic plans. Emphasis is on the rigor of identifying and establishing goals and project objectives; identifying metrics for evaluation; as well as tasks and activities to help achieve desired outcomes. Readings and discussions emphasize perspectives from nursing, health care, and industries outside the health care arena. The course is taught in five monthly on-campus three-hour seminars combined with a total of fifteen hours of Web-based instruction between on-campus sessions. Required of students in the nursing management, policy, and leadership specialty in the first year; open to others with permission of the instructor. Not offered in 2013–2014]

577a, Health Care Financial Management 3 credit hours. This course provides students with an introduction to accounting and finance and has been designed to provide a broad managerial overview of these topics within the context of nursing. Accounting and finance theories and tools are applied through both online exercises and problem sets to common decision-making situations experienced by nurse managers. This is intended to be an introductory course for nurses and accessible to individuals with no prior exposure to accounting or finance. Required of students in the nursing management, policy, and leadership specialty; open to nonmatriculated YSN students with permission of the instructor. Web-based instruction with monthly on-campus sessions. C. Irish, B. Maccallum

[578b, Introductory Clinical Practice for Nursing Management, Policy, and Leadership 2 credit hours. This course provides future nurse leaders with introductory clinical experiences in management, policy, and leadership. Depending on their area of interest and clinical placement, students complete a project for an organization that enables them to develop a foundation for leadership practice. Projects focus on quality improvement and patient safety in health care delivery or health policy, with a focus on a specific patient or workforce populations. Individual learning objectives, course objectives, supervised experiences, Web-based discussions, and oral presentations are methods used to facilitate learning. Required of students in the nursing management, policy, and leadership specialty. Prerequisites: 561a and 563a. Web-based instruction with monthly on-campus sessions. Not offered in 2013–2014]

580a, Women’s Health I: Clinical Care of the Well Woman 2.5 credit hours. This course teaches students to provide ambulatory, well-woman gynecologic and obstetrical care for healthy women across the life span. Students have eight hours of clinical practice per week for twelve weeks and attend clinical conference for one hour per week. The clinical seminar serves as a forum for students to explore issues encountered in clinical practice. Required of midwifery/women’s health nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Faculty

580b, Women’s Health II: Clinical Care of Women with Common Clinical Issues 2 credit hours. This course continues to address reproductive-based health care for pregnant and nonpregnant women across the life span, but introduces common gynecologic complications of the high-risk pregnant woman. Theory and evidence-based practice are presented through regularly scheduled class sessions, seminars, and problem-based learning case studies. Required of midwifery/women’s health nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Faculty

581a, Women’s Health I: Theoretical Foundations of Well-Woman Care 2 credit hours. This course introduces students to reproductive-based health care for pregnant and nonpregnant women across the life span. Theory and evidence-based practice are presented through regularly scheduled class sessions, seminars, and problem-based learning case studies. Required of midwifery/women’s health nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Faculty

581b, Women’s Health II: Theoretical Foundations for Care of Women with Common Clinical Issues 3 credit hours. This course provides students with increasing experience in ambulatory gynecologic and obstetrical settings for all women across the life span. Students have eight hours of clinical practice per week for fourteen weeks and attend clinical conference for one hour per week. The clinical seminar serves as a forum for students to explore issues encountered in clinical practice. Required of midwifery/women’s health nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Faculty

582b, Clinical Care of Childbirth 2.5 credit hours. Students are provided with supervised clinical experience in labor, birth, and postpartum care. Students have eight hours of clinical practice per week for twelve weeks and attend clinical conference for one hour per week. The clinical seminar serves as a forum for students to explore issues encountered in clinical practice. Faculty

583a, Nurse-Midwifery Primary Care 2 credit hours. This course introduces nurse-midwifery students to the concepts of health promotion and screening, as well as to the primary care management of selected common health conditions affecting women. Required of nurse-midwifery students in the final year of specialization. Faculty

583b, Theoretical Foundations for Care in Childbirth 2 credit hours. This course introduces theory, skills, and management of the well woman during the intrapartum and postpartum periods. Emphasis is on supporting normal physiologic birth and the transition to motherhood. Theory and evidence-based practice are presented through regularly scheduled class sessions, seminars, and problem-based learning case studies. Required of midwifery/women’s health nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Faculty

607b, Pathophysiology and Management of Common Adult Clinical Problems I 4 credit hours. This course provides a basis for predicting the vulnerability for common cardiovascular, respiratory, hematologic, renal, and neurological clinical problems that occur as a result of illness or outcome of treatment in adult and geriatric patients. Assessment, management, and evaluation are emphasized. Normal physiology, pathophysiology, and pharmacological management of these conditions are included. Required of adult/gerontology acute care nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Faculty

609a, Advanced Diagnostics in Acute Care 2.5 credit hours. This course provides comprehensive content necessary in the assessment of acutely, critically, and complex chronically ill adult and geriatric patients. Emphasis is on examination of the cardiovascular, respiratory, and acid-base systems based on complex interpretations from laboratory and technological findings. Required of adult/gerontology acute care nurse practitioner students in the first term of specialization. Simulation exercises are used to practice diagnostic skills. The electrocardiographic (ECG) components of the course may be taken as an elective by students in other specialties. Two and one-half hours per week for fifteen weeks. A. Cable, M. Funk

610a, Advanced Assessment 1 credit hour. This practicum concentrates on development of a systematic methodology of identifying patients’ needs for health care. Patient history taking, physical examination, diagnostic studies and interpretation, analysis of medical and nursing diagnoses, documentation, and student case presentation form the basis for this first clinical course (four direct clinical hours per week). Select clinical problems of patients in acute care gerontology settings are studied in the context of student case presentations. Physical diagnosis rounds with physician or nurse practitioner preceptors are included (six hours/seven weeks). Required of adult/gerontology acute care nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Prerequisite: successful completion of 554a skills tests. 6.8 hours per week for seven weeks. A. Cable, coordinator; M. Davies

611a, Conceptual Basis of Nursing Practice 1.5 credit hours. Through the discussion of philosophies, theories, models, and concepts from nursing and other disciplines, this course provides a foundation of understanding for a conceptual basis for nursing practice and research. Required of adult/gerontology acute care nurse practitioner students in the second year of specialization. T. Knobf

612b, Advanced Specialty Practicum I 3 credit hours. This practicum and seminar in the care of acutely, critically, and complex chronically ill adult and geriatric patients provides students with direct care experiences. The focus of this course is on assessment and management. Critical thinking, clinical analysis of patient data, formulation of differential diagnoses, and planning of care are emphasized. Clinical seminars focus on case presentation by students. Required of adult/gerontology acute care nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Prerequisite: successful completion of 554a, 609a, and 610a. Eight hours of clinical practice plus one hour of seminar per week. A. Cable, M. Funk

615b, Principles and Practice of Oncology 2 credit hours. This course provides comprehensive core cancer content, including the epidemiology, biology, genetics, and immunology of common cancers and the therapeutic modalities. The focus is on the advanced practice nurse across the continuum of cancer from diagnosis through treatment to survivorship or end-of-life care. Emphasis is on the advanced practice nurse’s role in management of the patient and family across the continuum. M. Lazenby

632a/b, Primary Care of Children I 2 credit hours per term. This course provides clinical experience in well-child care and management of common pediatric problems in a variety of primary care settings. Students provide primary health care, acute care, and beginning case management for pediatric patients in the context of their families. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis only. Required of pediatric nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Four and one-half hours in a clinical setting and one and one-half to two hours per week of clinical conference. P. Jackson Allen, M. Swartz

633a, Health Promotion in Infants and Children 2 credit hours. This course is designed to introduce the student to the primary care of children from infancy through adolescence. Key aspects of health promotion and disease prevention in culturally diverse pediatric populations are discussed within the context of the national health agenda. Health risks and behaviors of diverse populations are explored to determine culturally sensitive interventions. Clinical applications of concepts, theories, current health policies, and evidence-based best-practice guidelines related to well-child care are presented. Required of pediatric nurse practitioner and family nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization; open to others with permission of the instructor. M. Meadows-Oliver

635b, Management of Common Pediatric Problems 2 credit hours. This course is designed to focus on the assessment, diagnosis, evidence-based management, and best-practice guidelines for care of children from birth through adolescence for common pediatric health problems. Required of pediatric nurse practitioner and family nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization; open to others with permission of the instructor. N. Banasiak

640a or b, Clinical Practice in the Primary Care of Adolescents 2 credit hours. This course is designed to aid the student in gaining elementary skills in the assessment of adolescent development, both physiological and psychological; in the recognition and management of deviations from normal development and health status; and in intermediate-level skill in the care of adolescents, including health promotion and education. Required of pediatric nurse practitioner students in the second term of the first year or the first term of the second year of specialization. Six hours of clinical practice per week (fourteen weeks) and six hours total of clinical conference. J. Taylor

641b, Primary Care of Adolescents 1.5 credit hours. This course is designed to provide the student with a conceptual model for assessing normal psychological and physiological adolescent development, an understanding of the clinical relevance of basic deviations from normal development, and an understanding of the diagnosis and clinical care of adolescents in primary care settings. Required of pediatric, midwifery/women’s health, and family nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization; open to others with permission of the instructor. A. Moriarty Daley

643a, Individual and Family Development across the Life Span I 1.5 credit hours. This course focuses on a critical overview of conceptual and theoretical perspectives on individual development from infancy through adolescence and family development. Sociocultural, ethnic, gender, genetic, environmental, and political factors that influence individual and family development are reviewed and evaluated. Discussions focus on growth and transitions from infancy through adolescence. Assessment of family functioning, strengths, vulnerabilities, and normative transitions are presented from clinical and research perspectives. Required of pediatric nurse practitioner, family nurse practitioner, women’s health nurse practitioner/adult-gerontological nurse practitioner, and psychiatric–mental health nursing students in the first year of specialization; open to other students with permission of the instructor. L. Sadler

643b, Individual and Family Development across the Life Span II 1.5 credit hours. This course focuses on a critical overview of conceptual and theoretical perspectives on individual development from young adulthood through end of life and family development. Sociocultural, ethnic, gender, genetic, environmental, and political factors that influence individual and family development are reviewed and evaluated. Discussions focus on transitions from young adulthood to end of life. Assessment of family functioning, strengths, and vulnerabilities are presented from clinical and research perspectives. Selected family issues are analyzed within theoretical, clinical, and policy perspectives; and issues of particular significance for evidence-based advanced nursing are stressed. Required of pediatric nurse practitioner, family nurse practitioner, women’s health nurse practitioner/adult-gerontological nurse practitioner, and psychiatric–mental health nursing students in the first year of specialization; open to other students with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: successful completion of 643a. A. Crowley, C. Bruno

654a or b, Clinical Practice in Psychiatric–Mental Health Nursing of Children and Adolescents 2.5 credit hours. The goal of this first-year, one-term practicum is to provide the student with an opportunity to develop clinical skills with children and adolescent clients and their families. While in psychiatric clinical settings, students apply skills including holistic physical and mental health assessment, formulate differential diagnosis, plan and implement developmentally appropriate psychiatric nursing interventions, and evaluate interventions and outcomes. Emphasis is placed on application of a variety of population-specific assessment skills and use of differential diagnosis, and a beginning utilization of pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic treatment methods with individuals, groups, and families. Clinical experiences require the student to synthesize knowledge from courses, supplemental readings, clinical seminars, and practice experiences. Students are assigned to psychiatric clinical placements on the basis of development of competencies, previous clinical experience, and interests. Required of psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. This course must be taken concurrently with didactic first-year PMH specialty course work. Supervision seminar meets one and one-half hours per week. S. Durso

656a or b, Clinical Practice in Psychiatric–Mental Health Nursing of Adults 2.5 credit hours. The goal of this first-year, one-term practicum is to provide the student with an opportunity to develop clinical skills with adult clients and their families. While in psychiatric clinical settings, students apply skills including holistic physical and mental health assessment, formulate differential diagnosis, plan and implement developmentally appropriate psychiatric nursing interventions, and evaluate interventions and outcomes. Emphasis is placed on application of a variety of population-specific assessment skills and use of differential diagnosis, and a beginning utilization of pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic treatment methods with individuals, groups, and families. Clinical experiences require the student to synthesize knowledge from courses, supplemental readings, clinical seminars, and practice experiences. Students are assigned to psychiatric clinical placements on the basis of development of competencies, previous clinical experience, and interests. Required of psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. This course must be taken concurrently with didactic first-year PMH specialty course work. Supervision seminar meets one and one-half hours per week. J. Iennaco, A. de Lisser

657a, Mental Health Assessment across the Life Span 2.5 credit hours. This course provides students with concepts, techniques, and knowledge necessary to conduct accurate mental health evaluations of persons across the life span. Students learn to collect data guided by the principles of general health screening, psychiatric history, mental status examination, and diagnostic criteria from the IV DSM-V, therapeutic interviewing, and comprehensive history taking. A bio-psycho-social-cultural-spiritual framework is used to formulate a case history, determine accurate differential diagnoses, and make a psychiatric diagnosis using the DSM IV framework. Beginning development of treatment planning is also emphasized. Mental health assessment also emphasizes health risks within the psychiatric population, differentiation of physical conditions that may present as a primary psychiatric disorder, mental health promotion, and early case-finding to prevent mental illness. Other components of mental health assessment include the use of rating scales; evaluation of risk from dangerousness to self, others, or inability to care for self; the influence of family, sociocultural background, and developmental achievements; substance use and abuse; forensics; and trauma history. Required of psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Two hours per week classroom and one-half hour per week clinical/laboratory (1:3 credit ratio for clinical component of a course = 1.5 hours in clinical activities per week). Faculty

658a or b, Clinical Practice in Psychiatric–Mental Health Nursing of Older Adults 2.5 credit hours. The goal of this first-year, one-term practicum is to provide the student with an opportunity to develop clinical skills with older adult clients and their families. While in psychiatric clinical settings, students apply skills including holistic physical and mental health assessment, formulate differential diagnosis, plan and implement developmentally appropriate psychiatric nursing interventions, and evaluate interventions and outcomes. Emphasis is placed on application of a variety of population-specific assessment skills and use of differential diagnosis, and a beginning utilization of pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic treatment methods with individuals, groups, and families. Clinical experiences require the student to synthesize knowledge from courses, supplemental readings, clinical seminars, and practice experiences. Students are assigned to psychiatric clinical placements on the basis of development of competencies, previous clinical experience, and interests. Required of psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. This course may be taken concurrently with didactic first- or second-year PMH specialty course work. Supervision seminar meets one and one-half hours per week. A. de Lisser

661b, Psychotherapy across the Life Span 2 credit hours. This course provides an overview of the major schools of personality theory and psychological development and the individual psychotherapy treatment modalities that were developed from them. It assists the student in conceptualizing personality, behavior, and defensive structure in order to better understand the dynamics of the patient and the therapeutic relationship. A comparison of biologic, social, psychodynamic, relational, humanistic, existential, cognitive, and behavioral psychotherapeutic treatment modalities assists the student in beginning utilization of select interventions specifically suited to individual patient problems identified in advanced practice psychiatric nursing. Required of first-year students in the psychiatric–mental health specialty. A. de Lisser

663a/b, Psychopathology across the Life Span I and II 2 credit hours (each term). This course examines the psychopathology and neurobiology of major psychiatric disorders across the life span. Essentials of neuroanatomy and neurobiology are examined as they relate to psychiatric symptoms. Disorders selected for examination are those most commonly seen in clinical settings in children, adolescents, adults, and older adults, including anxiety; depression; and behavioral, personality, and cognitive disorders (ADHD, Alzheimer’s). The public health importance, epidemiology, risk factors, and neuroscience are reviewed. The examination integrates genetic and environmental influences to support an understanding of the interpersonal, cognitive, emotional, and behavioral processes that define and underlie major mental illnesses. Evidence-based treatments are discussed in relationship to their impact on behavior, symptoms, neurobiology, and family systems. Required of first-year students in the psychiatric–mental health specialty; open to others with permission of the instructor. J. Iennaco

704a/b/c, Master’s Independent Study This elective study is initiated by the student and negotiated with faculty. The purpose is to allow in-depth pursuit of individual areas of interest and/or practice. A written proposal must be submitted and signed by the student, the faculty member(s), and the appropriate specialty director. Credit varies according to the terms of the contract.

713a/EMD 557a, Global HIV/AIDS: Challenges and Response 2 credit hours. This course provides an overview of the critical issues in the global epidemiology and prevention of HIV/AIDS among vulnerable populations. The course emphasizes the importance of multidisciplinary approaches to the comprehension of and response to the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The course is designed to go beyond the mere provision of information by encouraging students to develop the ability to critically access and analyze research, programmatic, policy, and ethical challenges raised by the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Offered through the School of Public Health. K. Khoshnood

717a, The Contexts of Care 2 credit hours. Advanced practice nursing occurs in contexts that inevitably influence practice. This course provides students an integrative experience in applying health policy and organizational, regulatory, safety, quality, and ethical concepts to care. The course utilizes cases for analysis of the contextual basis of practice in combination with assigned readings, lectures, discussion, and Web-based modules. The cases highlight various concepts that provide the infrastructure of the health care environment, including organizational leadership and culture; ethics; risk and liability; access and coverage; quality and safety; credentialing; and inter- and intra-professional issues. The course is organized into five content areas: Regulation and Scope of Practice; Leadership and Organizational Dynamics; Health Care Access, Coverage, and Finance; Clinical Ethics; and Safety and Quality. Twenty-four hours of the course are conducted in face-to-face sessions; six hours utilize a Web-based format. Required of all master’s degree candidates in the clinical specialties in the final year. J. Kunisch

733b, Living with Dying 1.5–3.0 credit hours. This course develops students’ cultural and gender awareness, understanding, and competencies in creating environments to relieve suffering for individuals and their families who have experienced a death or are caring for someone who is dying. Emphasis is on nonpharmacologic interventions to relieve suffering, including spiritual, interpersonal, and sociocultural. The course is structured with the premise that relief from suffering, meaning, and transcendence at the end of life are best achieved and understood through the interpersonal use of narrative techniques, like storytelling, to facilitate communication. One and one-half hours per week. R. McCorkle

735b, Environment and Health 1.5 credit hours. The environment is a major determinant of health. To promote environmental health, we must understand environmental health problems in a comprehensive way, reaching from physiological research on health effects of toxic agents to actions that people may take, individually and collectively, to reduce their risks of adverse health effects. This course utilizes an integrative model for environmental health research incorporating four domains: physiology, vulnerability, epistemology, and health protection. Discussions include issues of environmental justice and implications for public health policy. J. Dixon

752a/b, Advanced Clinical Practice in Women’s Health Care 3 credit hours (each term). The focus of this practicum is comprehensive management of health care needs specific to women within the context of their lives from the clinical perspective. This course concentrates on the application of physiologic, developmental, psychosocial, and cultural theories to advanced clinical decision making, focusing on reproductive and developmental health issues for women from adolescence to senescence. Required of students in the midwifery/women’s health nurse practitioner specialty in the fall and spring terms of the final year. Taken concurrently with 753a/b. Prerequisite (fall term): successful completion of all courses required for the first and second terms of the midwifery/women’s health nurse practitioner specialty. Prerequisite (spring term): successful completion of all courses required for the first three terms of the midwifery/women’s health nurse practitioner specialty. Eight hours of clinical practice (fifteen weeks) and one hour of clinical conference per week (each term). A. Swan

753a/b, Advanced Concepts in Women’s Health Care 2 credit hours (each term). This course focuses on advanced and comprehensive management of the pregnant and nonpregnant woman and on examination of issues that impact women’s lives from clinical and theoretical perspectives. Concentration is on advanced management topics, and application of physiologic, developmental, psychosocial, and cultural factors to consider in providing care to diverse populations, focusing on reproductive and developmental health issues for women from adolescence to senescence. The role of the women’s health nurse practitioner as a policy advocate for women’s health care is explored. Required of students in the midwifery/women’s health nurse practitioner specialty in the fall and spring terms of the final year. Taken concurrently with 752a/b. Prerequisite (fall term): successful completion of all courses required for the first and second terms of the midwifery/women’s health nurse practitioner specialty. Prerequisite (spring term): successful completion of all courses required for the first three terms of the midwifery/women’s health nurse practitioner specialty. Two hours of didactic content per week (each term). Faculty

756a/b, Advanced Clinical Practice for Adult/Gerontological, Family, and Women’s Health Nurse Practitioners 3.2–5.8 credit hours. This clinical course builds upon the experiences gained in 556b and provides students further opportunity to develop advanced nursing skills, clinical judgment, and evidence-based patient management strategies necessary to manage common acute and chronic health care conditions. Students participate in designated weekly primary care clinical experiences arranged by faculty. In addition, students meet weekly for a one-and-one-half-hour clinical conference that is held concurrently with clinical practice. Clinical seminar discussions for family nurse practitioner students focus on family-centered care and providing care for patients across the life span. Clinical seminar discussions for all other students focus on providing patient-centered care for patients from adolescence to senescence. Clinical conference serves as a forum for students to present and discuss cases and explore issues encountered in clinical practice. Taken concurrently with 757a/b and, for family nurse practitioners, with 833a/b. Prerequisite (or concurrent with): 556b. Required of adult/gerontological, family, and women’s health nurse practitioner students in the final year. Eight to sixteen hours of clinical practice per week (fifteen weeks), and one and one-half hours of clinical conference per week (each term). C. Bruno, coordinator

757a, Primary Care of Adults II 2 credit hours. This is the third of four didactic courses designed to enable students to develop the necessary knowledge base and problem-solving skills for primary care practice as nurse practitioners. Classes focus on health promotion and maintenance, and assessment, differential diagnoses, and evidence-based management of acute and chronic conditions for patients from adolescence to senescence, highlighting management of patients with co-morbid conditions. Required of adult/gerontological, family, and women’s health nurse practitioner students in the final year. Taken concurrently with 756a. Prerequisite: successful completion of 556b and 557a/b. Faculty

757b, Primary Care of Adults II 2 credit hours. This is the final of four didactic courses designed to enable students to develop the necessary knowledge base and problem-solving skills for primary care practice as nurse practitioners. Classes focus on health promotion and maintenance, and assessment, differential diagnoses, and evidence-based management of acute and chronic conditions for patients from adolescence to senescence, highlighting management of patients with complex co-morbid conditions. Required of adult/gerontological, family, and women’s health nurse practitioner students in the final year. Taken concurrently with 756b. Prerequisite: successful completion of 756a and 757a. Faculty

768a/b, Clinical Practice in Diabetes Care and Management 1.65 credit hours (each term). The focus of this practicum is comprehensive management of a caseload of patients with diabetes specific to the student’s elected specialty (pediatric, midwifery/women’s health, adult/gerontology acute care, and family nurse practitioner). The spring term is an extension of the fall and focuses on the management of common problems related to long-term diabetes complications encouraging clinical decision making and management of co-morbidities. Student’s clinical practicum in diabetes care is in various settings specific to student’s specialty program. Four hours per week of practice required both terms. One hour of clinical conference per week. V. Jefferson

769a, Advanced Concepts and Principles of Diabetes Care 2 credit hours. This seminar focuses on the concepts and principles of diabetes managed care based on the annually updated American Diabetes Association Standards of Care. It includes principles of primary care (screening, early detection, intervention, and patient education), secondary care principles related to diabetes management (various treatment modalities, patient education, and self-care), and tertiary care related to complications. These concepts and principles of care are presented relative to type of diabetes (type 1, type 2, gestational, diabetes in pregnancy, and secondary), age, developmental stage, duration of disease, and ethnicity. A multidisciplinary approach to care issues is emphasized, incorporating the contributions of other disciplines in the collaborative management of diabetes. Important aspects of living with a chronic illness such as psychological, social, occupational, and economic are also emphasized. Required of all students in the diabetes care concentration in the final year. V. Jefferson

780a, Advanced Midwifery Care 6 credit hours (2 credits didactic, 4 credits clinical). Students continue clinical experiences in antepartum, intrapartum, newborn, postpartum, gynecology, and primary care areas, extending their abilities through lectures, seminars, case studies, and self-directed learning to provide care in more complicated clinical situations. Students are required to be certified in neonatal resuscitation through the American Academy of Pediatrics course. Required of nurse-midwifery students in the final year of specialization. This course will become 780a, Women’s Health III: Clinical Care of Women with Complex Health Issues, beginning fall 2014. M. Stone-Godena

780b, Integration 9 credit hours (8.5 credits clinical, 0.5 credit clinical conference). This course is designed to help students assimilate all the areas of nurse-midwifery practice in a way that enables them to provide full-scope care with appropriate clinical supervision, academic support, and clinical support including site preceptors, faculty, school, and library resources. During the course, students continue to refine their ability to provide quality evidence-based practice within appropriate cultural contexts of care and provide patient safety in clinical practice as they continue to be mindful of the responsibilities and accountability inherent in their emerging professional role. Students are expected to build on the knowledge and skills obtained in all previous courses. Prerequisites: all YSN core courses and all nurse-midwifery core courses. Required of nurse-midwifery students in the final year of specialization. Minimum thirty-two hours per week of clinical practice (including 1:3-hour ratio for on-call time as negotiated with clinical preceptors, which is dependent on the clinical site and the student’s ability to demonstrate clinical proficiency) plus 1.7 hours per week of clinical conference). This course will become 780b, Women’s Health IV: Integration of Women’s Health Care, beginning fall 2014. Faculty

[781a, Women’s Health III: Theoretical Foundations for Care of Women with Complex Health Issues 2 credit hours. In this course, students continue to develop evidence-based reproductive health care for women across the life span. This course concentrates on the physiologic, developmental, psychosocial, and cultural theories of advanced clinical decision making, focusing on reproductive and developmental health issues of women across the life span. Complex health issues are analyzed through regularly scheduled class sessions, seminars, assignments, and problem-based learning case studies. Emphasis is on collaboration within multidisciplinary teams. Required of midwifery/women’s health nurse practitioner students in the second year of specialization. Not offered in 2013–2014]

[782a, Clinical Care of At-Risk Childbirth 2.5 credit hours. Students focus on providing increasingly complex intrapartum and postpartum care as members of a multidisciplinary team in diverse settings. Students have eight hours of clinical practice per week for twelve weeks and attend clinical conference for one hour per week. The clinical seminar serves as a forum for students to explore issues encountered in clinical practice. Required of midwifery/women’s health nurse practitioner students in the second year of specialization. Not offered in 2013–2014]

[783a, Theoretical Foundations for Care of At-Risk Childbirth 1.5 credit hours. This course focuses on advanced theoretical concepts and comprehensive management of the pregnant woman with at-risk pregnancies or co-morbid health problems. Complex health issues are analyzed through regularly scheduled class sessions, seminars, assignments, and problem-based learning case studies. Management includes triage; prenatal, birth, and postpartum emergencies; and perinatal loss. Emphasis is on collaboration within multidisciplinary teams. Required of midwifery/women’s health nurse practitioner students in the second year of specialization. Not offered in 2013–2014]

[784b, Integration of Midwifery Care 4.5 credit hours. This course is designed to help students assimilate all the areas of nurse-midwifery practice in a way that enables them to provide full-scope care with appropriate clinical supervision, academic support, and clinical support including site preceptors, faculty, school, and library resources. During the course, students continue to refine their ability to provide high-quality, evidence-based practice within appropriate cultural contexts of care and to provide patient safety in clinical practice as they continue to be mindful of the responsibilities and accountability inherent in their emerging professional role. Students are expected to build on the knowledge and skills obtained in all previous courses; focus is on intrapartum, postpartum, and newborn care. Required of midwifery/women’s health nurse practitioner students in the second year of specialization. Not offered in 2013–2014]

785a, Professional Issues in Midwifery 1 credit hour. This course is an introduction to the profession of nurse-midwifery and midwifery; to the national professional organization, the American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM); and to public policy and programs affecting the health care of women, mothers, and infants. The course prepares students to participate knowledgeably in local, regional, national, and international midwifery meetings and activities of the ACNM; and in legislative and policy initiatives for health care of women, infants, and others; and to accept the responsibility inherent in the profession. Required of all students in the midwifery/women’s health nurse practitioner specialty. Faculty

802a/b, Advanced Clinical Practicum for Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioners 8.3 credit hours per term. This yearlong practicum provides students with clinical experience in data-gathering techniques, diagnostic reasoning, management of acute and chronic health problems, application of technology in patient care, consultation, collaboration, health promotion, and risk factor modification. This course builds upon the foundational objectives successfully met in 612b. The differential diagnosis and treatment of complex health problems commonly seen in acutely ill adult/gerontology patients are stressed, with special emphasis on conditions presented in 607b and 807a. The focus is on those acute illnesses with a predictable course and established treatment approaches. Students have the opportunity to manage a caseload of patients from admission through discharge, as well as follow patients on an outpatient basis. A one-hour weekly clinical conference addresses acute care clinical issues. This practicum is required of adult/gerontology acute care nurse practitioner students in the final year of specialization. Preceptors are A.P.R.N.s and physicians. Twenty-four hours per week in an acute care setting for fifteen weeks in the fall term and fifteen weeks in the spring term for a total of 720 hours. L. Andrews

803a/b, Management of Clinical Problems 2 credit hours per term (1 credit hour for students in the oncology concentration). The content of this course focuses on the symptom experience and common clinical problems of adults with cancer. The focus is on assessment, differential diagnosis, and management of common problems and side effects of therapy emphasizing patient-centered care and strategies for self-management. Required of oncology clinical nurse specialist and oncology nurse practitioner students in the final year of specialization. Prerequisites: successful completion of 615a/b, and 803a to continue with 803b. R. Sipples

804a/b, Clinical Practicum for Oncology Nurse Practitioners 5.8 credit hours per term (3 credit hours for students in the oncology concentration). The goal of this practicum is to prepare students to comprehensively manage a caseload of adults with cancer. Emphasis is on prediction of high-incidence clinical problems, refinement of clinical reasoning in assessment, differential diagnosis, and formulation of management strategies. The practice sites provide opportunities to understand cancer care along the continuum, develop clinical leadership skills, provide continuity of care across settings, and deliver high-quality supportive care to patients and families. Prerequisite: successful completion of first-year specialty courses. Required of oncology nurse practitioner students in the final year of specialization. Fifteen hours per week of clinical practice (eight hours per week for those in the oncology concentration), plus one hour per week of clinical conference. V. Dest, T. Knobf

805a, Cancer Pharmacology 1.5 credit hours. This course provides essential knowledge for the pharmacologic management of the adult with cancer. Content includes pharmacologic management of the disease, supportive therapies, and medication safety in cancer patients. Treatment indications, side effects, polypharmacy issues, and acute and long-term toxicities are emphasized. Required of oncology nurse practitioner students in the final year of specialization. M. Lazenby, N. Beaulieu

807a, Pathophysiology and Management of Common Adult Clinical Problems II 4 credit hours. This course provides a basis for predicting the vulnerability for common clinical problems in acute care patients. These include: trauma and endocrine, hepatic, gastrointestinal, infection/sepsis, and end-of-life problems that occur as a result of illness or outcome of treatment. Assessment, management, and evaluation are emphasized. Normal physiology, pathophysiology, and pharmacological management of these systems are included. Required of adult/gerontology acute care nurse practitioner students in the final year of specialization. Faculty

810b, Advanced Specialty Practicum II for Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioners 3 credit hours. The focus of this practicum is comprehensive management of a caseload of patients with adult/gerontology acute care chronic and/or acute complex conditions. Emphasis is on prediction of common patient problems, formulation of management protocols, and generation of research questions. Students are required to take this course but may request to exempt out as determined by faculty review of a clinical portfolio and competency. Eight hours of clinical practice plus one hour of clinical conference per week. L. Andrews, M. Funk

817b, Professional Practice Issues for Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioners 2 credit hours. This course is designed to develop the adult/gerontology acute care nurse practitioner student’s transition to the professional role. The course explores the essential theoretical and practical considerations underlying the multiple roles of the acute care nurse practitioner—leader, educator, researcher, advocate, clinician, consultant, collaborator, and systems navigator. Topics to be addressed include: informatics, organizational leadership theory and skill development, quality improvement and safety, health care advocacy and policy, and interprofessional collaboration and consultation. Required of all students in the final year of specialization in the adult/gerontology acute care nurse practitioner specialty. This is a hybrid course that includes four two-hour, on-site sessions coupled with eleven weeks of online course work. Faculty

819b, Health Promotion and Disease Prevention across the Adult Continuum 1.5 credit hours. The focus of this course is on the exploration of primary care issues and management throughout the adult/gerontology continuum. Healthy People 2020 is used as a framework, together with theories, clinical concepts, and research from multiple disciplines. Clinical practice guidelines are explored in concert with Healthy People 2020. In addition, this course synthesizes the principles of culturally sensitive, population-centered, interdisciplinary health promotion and prevention within the context of specialty care. Required of adult/gerontology acute care nurse practitioner students. Faculty

825a, Advanced Practice in Early Care and School Health 1 credit hour. This seminar provides a forum for discussion and analysis of the advanced practice nursing (APN) role in early care and school settings from infancy through high school. Building on concepts and skills in primary care practice, the seminar explores the role of the APN in health promotion and disease management within early care and educational settings in coordination with other systems of care, such as primary and specialty care, and families. Topics specific to these settings include role development; models of health care delivery and consultation; care of children/adolescents with chronic illnesses and special health care needs; legal issues; and early care and educational system structure. Federal, state, and local legislation as well as policies governing health care in these settings are included. Required of pediatric nurse practitioner students in the final year of study; open to others with permission of the instructor. Prerequisites: all 600-level first-year specialty pediatric nurse practitioner courses. One and one-half hours per week for ten weeks. A. Crowley

826a/b, Clinical Practice in School Health 2 credit hours. This clinical course is designed to provide an opportunity to develop an advanced practice nursing role in the school setting. Experience is in a school-based or early care clinic where the student provides primary and episodic care to the client population, participates in health education, as well as consults and collaborates with other health and education personnel in the school and community. Required of pediatric nurse practitioner students. Six hours of clinical practice (fourteen weeks) and six hours of clinical conference per week. J. Taylor

827b, Pathophysiology and Advanced Management of Chronic Health Conditions in Children and Adolescents 2 credit hours. This course focuses on the pathophysiology and advanced management of chronic health conditions of children and adolescents across settings. Utilizing a systems approach, pathophysiology is reviewed, and then prototype chronic conditions and related interventions and management are discussed. Required of pediatric nurse practitioner students in the final year. R.A. Kingsley

830a/b, Primary Care of Children II 2 credit hours per term. This course provides clinical experience in advanced pediatric primary care and management, including work with complex families. The student provides health care for children over the course of the year in the Primary Care Center, Yale-New Haven Hospital, and at selected pediatric primary care sites in the community. Required of pediatric nurse practitioner students in the final year of specialization. Four and one-half hours clinical practice per week and one and one-half hours clinical conference per week. Prerequisite: successful completion of 632a/b. N. Banasiak

833a/b, Advanced Management of Pediatric Problems in the Primary Care Setting 2 credit hours per term. This seminar provides a forum for discussion of a variety of pediatric conditions encountered in the primary care setting. It focuses on the assessment and management of complex outpatient pediatric problems and the role of the advanced practice nurse in managing these problems. Lectures, discussions, and cases by guest speakers, faculty, and students. Required of pediatric and family nurse practitioner students in the second year of specialization. Prerequisite: successful completion of 635b. P. Ryan-Krause

834a or b, Specialty Pediatric Clinical Practice 1.7 credit hours. This clinical practicum provides students with the opportunity to gain additional knowledge and experience in specialty practice areas with relevance to pediatric primary care. Required of pediatric nurse practitioner students in the final year of specialization, usually taken during the spring term. A second term may be taken as an elective in the final year with permission of the course instructor and faculty adviser. Four and one-half hours of clinical practice per week and eight hours of clinical conference. P. Jackson Allen

845a, Pediatric Pharmacology 1.2 credit hours. This pharmacology course builds on general principles of pharmacology for advanced practice nurses and is designed to prepare students in the PNP specialty to apply principles of pharmacotherapeutics in the management of children’s and adolescents’ health. Students learn to identify the correct pharmaceutical agents(s) for therapy and develop plans to monitor the results for effectiveness and safety in the pediatric primary care setting. Required of pediatric nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization; open to others with permission of the instructor. Two hours for nine weeks. A. Crowley

851b, Application of Evidence in Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nursing 2 credit hours. The provision of mental health services is determined by many factors including policy, public demand, research evidence, ideas among general practitioners and mental health professionals, and the financial pressures under which purchasers and providers of services work. These groups often have widely disparate views about the nature of mental disorders and their most appropriate interventions. In providing services to individuals, families, groups, systems, and organizations, the advanced practice psychiatric nurse functions as clinician, consultant, leader, educator, and researcher in the analysis of critical issues important to decision making and intervention. The assumption underlying the course is that all advanced practice mental health services should be fundamentally theoretical and evidence-based. In this course students define clinical problems and system implications, use technology to identify clinical and research evidence, and critically analyze the evidence. Based on this analysis they devise and present realistic plans for intervention in the clinical setting and write an evidence-based review paper summarizing the results. Discussion about what constitutes the best available evidence to clarify decision making with regard to a variety of mental health and health promotion needs is addressed. Required of all students in the final year of the psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner specialty. J. Iennaco

854a/b, Advanced Family Psychiatric Nursing Practicum 4.5 credit hours per term (4 credits clinical practice, 0.5 credit clinical conference). The aim of the second-year clinical practicum is to promote development of clinical and leadership skills required for advanced professional practice in family psychiatric–mental health nursing. Building on first-year clinical skills, students are expected to employ advanced assessment and diagnostic reasoning skills, psychotherapeutic (e.g., group, individual, family) techniques, and psychopharmacological interventions with children, adolescents, adults, and their families in a variety of psychiatric clinical settings. Ethnic, gender, and developmentally appropriate therapeutic, educational, and supportive intervention strategies are implemented for patients across the life span. Students are expected to collaborate with other health care providers in the care of their patients. Health promotion and disease prevention strategies are examined and prioritized in relation to promoting mental and physical health with ethnically diverse individuals, groups, and families. Role delineation, ethical and legal responsibilities, and expectations related to prescriptive authority, evidence-based decision making, anticipatory guidance, and therapeutic psychiatric–mental health care are explored. Students expand practice experiences to include leadership and indirect clinical activities (e.g., consultation, supervision, or education; understanding of organizational systems and structures; systems issues; and the professional advanced practice nursing role, collaboration, and leadership) within their practice sites. Required of all psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner students in the second year who have completed first-year clinical and didactic requirements. Supervision seminar meets one and one-half hours per week. Faculty

855a, Group Psychotherapy Seminar 1.5 credit hours. This course examines methods and major conceptual frameworks of group psychotherapy, especially Yalom’s group therapy model. Emphasis is placed on the application of theory to the clinical realities of groups encountered in various inpatient and outpatient settings. This course examines various group treatment modalities and how they are useful in different psychiatric disorders and settings. It demonstrates how group treatment choices are made through patient assessment; diagnosis; and cognitive, cultural, individual, and pharmacological considerations. Knowledge of group dynamics and systems theory is reviewed through the current literature and research. The lab portion of this course offers the opportunity for students to have a task group experience and examine group norms, process, communication patterns, roles, subgroups, stages of group development, and styles of leadership. Group psychotherapy is taught in the final year of the psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner specialty. One credit hour per week of classroom and one-half hour per week of clinical/laboratory (1:3 credit ratio for clinical component of a course = 1.5 hours in clinical activities per week). A. de Lisser

859b, Clinical Psychopharmacology across the Life Span 2 credits. This course covers the principles of psychiatric pharmacotherapy across the life span and the role of the advanced practice psychiatric nurse prescriber. It focuses on biological mechanisms of action of psychotropic drugs; common side effects and adverse reactions; safety issues in prescribing psychotropic medications; and alterations needed in using these agents in specialty populations. The neurobiological components important in understanding symptom etiology and treatment are incorporated to select the most efficacious pharmacologic treatment of psychiatric disorders. Pharmacological history, differential diagnoses, and symptoms targeted for pharmacological activity are incorporated as integral components of prescriptive practice. An emphasis on clinical decision making includes all phases of pharmacologic treatment: evaluation and diagnosis; initiation of treatment; determining efficacy; evaluating side effects; enhancing patient adherence; evaluation of response long-term; maintenance vs. discontinuation; patient education; and integration of psychotherapy. Sources of information include evidence-based data, treatment algorithms, established practice guidelines, textbooks, journal articles, and current conference proceedings. Required of all students in the first year of the psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner specialty; others may be admitted with permission of the instructor. M. Moller

[860a, Advanced Clinical Practice in Psychiatric–Mental Health Nursing across the Life Span 4.5 credit hours. The aim of the fall-term, second-year clinical practicum is to promote development of clinical and leadership skills required for advanced professional practice across the life span in psychiatric–mental health nursing. Building on first-year clinical skills, students are expected to choose, implement, and evaluate advanced assessment and differential diagnostic reasoning skills, psychotherapeutic (e.g., group, individual, family) techniques, and psychopharmacological interventions with children, adolescents, adults, and older adults, and their families in a variety of psychiatric clinical settings. Ethnic, gender, and developmentally appropriate therapeutic, educational, and supportive intervention strategies are implemented for patients across the life span. Students are expected to collaborate with other health care providers in the care of their patients. Health promotion and disease prevention strategies are examined and prioritized in relation to promoting mental and physical health with ethnically diverse individuals, groups, and families. Role delineation, ethical and legal responsibilities, and clinical expectations related to prescriptive authority, evidence-based decision making, anticipatory guidance, and therapeutic psychiatric–mental health nursing care are explored. Required of all psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner students in the second year who have completed first-year clinical and didactic requirements. Four credit hours for clinical practice and one-half credit hour for weekly, ninety-minute clinical supervision conferences. Not offered in 2013–2014]

861b, Applied Psychopharmacology across the Life Span 2 credit hours. This elective course builds on 859b and is designed to facilitate student expertise and confidence in prescribing the major categories of psychiatric medications to patients across the life span. The course is divided into eight major topic areas: antipsychotic, antidepressant, anti-anxiety, mood-stabilizing, hypnotic, stimulant, cognitive enhancement, and substance abuse treatment medications used in the treatment of psychiatric disorders across the life span. The concepts of sleep disruption, personality function, and pain management are integrated into each topic area. Each topic area includes two class sessions. The first reviews the biological mechanisms of action, common adverse events, drug-drug and drug-nutrient interactions, safety issues, and monitoring implications of the psychopharmacology category. The second is case-based, using real-life, interactive, Web-based cases for group problem solving and consensus building regarding the most appropriate psychopharmacological course of treatment incorporating legal-ethical and bio-psycho-social-cultural-spiritual components of care. Upon completion, students will be prepared to complete Phase 1 of the Neuroscience Education Institute’s Master Psychopharmacology Program. Suggested for all PMHNP students in the spring of the second year of specialization. Two hours per week. Faculty

[862b, Immersion in Advanced Clinical Practice in Psychiatric–Mental Health Nursing across the Life Span 7.5 credit hours. The aim of this final-term, second-year clinical practicum is to provide a clinical immersion experience with a specific patient population. Building on and enhancing the competencies of 860a, the emphasis of the course is on the integration and application of leadership, ethics, patient safety, quality improvement, systems, and care delivery principles in advanced practice psychiatric–mental health nursing. This course builds on the knowledge and competencies acquired throughout the program of study and the required clinical practica Students gain increased competency and demonstrate increased accountability in the provision of comprehensive psychiatric–mental health care in the designated clinical site(s). Students expand practice experiences to include leadership and indirect clinical activities (e.g., consultation, supervision, or education; understanding of organizational systems and structures, policy and systems issues, and the professional advanced practice nursing role; collaboration and leadership) within their practice sites. Seven credit hours for clinical practice and one-half credit hour for weekly, ninety-minute clinical supervision conferences. Not offered in 2013–2014]

865b, Family Psychotherapy Seminar 1.5 credit hours. This course provides an overview and critical analysis of family theories and conceptual models. The course examines the applicability of these models to guide advanced family psychiatric–mental health practice with children, adolescents, adults, and their families. The strengths and limitations of such models as Bowenian, cognitive-behavioral, structural, and problem-solving are compared and contrasted in relation to their potential to guide psychotherapy with children, adolescents, adults, and their families. The course content also examines how the selected family theories and conceptual models take into account and address the influence of cultural, social, and ethical issues, and of mental and physical health status, on the family systems over time. A lab component assists students in applying family theories and models to guide their assessment, treatment, and evaluation of family therapy with ethnically diverse families in a variety of inpatient and outpatient settings. One hour per week classroom and one-half hour per week clinical/laboratory (1:3 credit ratio for clinical component of a course = 1.5 hours in clinical activities per week). Required of psychiatric–mental health nurse practitioner students in their second year. A de Lisser

873a, Human Resource Management 3 credit hours. This Web-based course provides an overview of contemporary human resource management in the health care setting. Particular emphasis is given to current approaches and evidence regarding the development and design of human resource programs that meet the needs of diverse employees, teams, and settings. Students evaluate the evidence, theories, and strategies for multidisciplinary teams in a variety of clinical settings. The intersection among human resource policies, safety, and quality outcomes is explored with a particular emphasis on the role of nursing leadership in human resource management. Required of students in the nursing management, policy, and leadership specialty; open to others with permission of the instructor. M. Bettigole

875a, Key Concepts in Role Development 1 credit hour. This course introduces students to role theory and its application to leadership in nursing. The course includes examination of narratives of nurse leaders and their leadership roles. Nurse leaders provide real-life dilemmas of leadership. Students conduct a self-assessment of role readiness for career goals and develop a plan to attain identified leadership and management skills. Topics include group leadership, entering organizations, authority, responsibility, communication, decision making, self-awareness, and cultural sensitivity. Course is taught in two half-day seminars (three hours each) and guided Web-based learning. Required of students in the nursing management, policy, and leadership specialty; open to others with permission of the instructor. J. Kunisch

[877b, Evaluation of Programs and Policies 2 credit hours. This course introduces students to evaluation of health care programs and policies in institutional, community, and policy settings. Emphasis is on matching evaluation methods to evaluation purposes within the context of program life cycle in order to be relevant to decisions to be made. Methods for analyzing effectiveness of programs, and also formative evaluation, are addressed. Students select a report of a program or policy evaluation for critique and adaptation. The course is taught in five half-day seminars (three hours each) with interactive Web-based learning between on-campus seminar sessions (fifteen hours). Required of students in the nursing management, policy, and leadership specialty; open to others with permission of the instructor. Not offered in 2013–2014]

878b, Advanced Clinical in NMPL 4 credit hours. This clinical practicum enables students in the last year of the nursing management, policy, and leadership specialty to apply knowledge and skills learned in all prior course work and experiences. Each student’s clinical placement is individualized to match the student’s interest, professional experiences and accomplishments, and career goals. It provides the opportunity for the student to engage at a leadership level under the direct supervision of a senior-level administrator/analyst/nurse consultant in a health care delivery, policy setting, or other related setting. Based upon mutual decision of the student, preceptor, and faculty, students undertake and complete at least one major initiative that requires the development of stated goals, a strategy for implementation and completion, utilization of tools for organizational analysis, change management, and project planning. Each student evaluates the organizational culture and group dynamics using tools acquired throughout the program. Students are expected to develop a timeline for the clinical experience, based upon approved goals and objectives. Weekly online discussion, complemented by monthly classes and individual work sessions with the instructors, gives students the opportunity to share experiences throughout the term. A formal presentation of students’ final projects demonstrates mastery of critical management and leadership skills to accomplish organizational goals. Required of students in the nursing management, policy, and leadership specialty. Faculty

879b, Capstone 3 credit hours. This course provides students in the final term of the nursing management, policy, and leadership program with an opportunity to study and dissect complex management, leadership, and policy issues in nursing and health care. Online discussion forums on selected contemporaneous issues and Master Classes with invited guests are intended to create a learning environment of reflection and analysis. Topics emphasize nursing in the context of professional, political, and policy considerations, especially the role of values in analysis and decision making. Topics change as contemporary events change but always include organizational behavior, advanced practice in nursing, role of the chief nursing officer, governance, strategy, and communication about nursing. Students build upon their experiences in 878b to produce a significant capstone paper. The course is taught in five monthly on-campus seminars combined with thirty hours of Web-based instruction. Required of students in the nursing management, policy, and leadership specialty in the final year. D. Diers

895b, Clinical Pharmacology 2 credit hours. This course is designed for APRN and master’s-level students to build upon their introduction to drug therapy course. Principles of pharmacology are presented through the study of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Emphasis is placed on drug categories, mechanisms of action, and side effects. Following initial content on general principles, applied interpretation of some of the most common clinical indications and considerations for prescribing are addressed. Student participation demonstrates understanding of clinical applications of pharmacologic principles and concepts. Required of all clinical master’s students in the first year of specialization. Two hours per week. Faculty

897a or b, Specialty Care Clinical Pharmacology 1 credit hour. This course is designed to prepare students to clinically apply pharmacotherapeutics from an advanced practice nursing approach for patient-specific populations. Through lectures and selected case studies and class or online discussion, students learn to identify the correct pharmaceutical agent(s) for therapy and to develop plans to monitor the results for effectiveness and safety in a variety of advanced practice nursing clinical settings. Students are expected to utilize multiple methods for obtaining pharmacological information. Required of students in the adult/gerontology acute care nurse practitioner, family nurse practitioner, and midwifery/women’s health nurse practitioner specialties. Taken concurrently with, or in the term immediately following, 895b. Successful completion of this course is required for graduation. Fifteen hours over the course of the term. Faculty

901a, Quantitative Methods for Nursing Research This advanced course in quantitative research methods provides an opportunity to evaluate various research designs used to investigate problems of importance to nursing and health. Emphasis is placed on the interrelationships of the clinical problem, study aims, and study design—with the goal of understanding methods decisions that are made by researchers, and how these decisions influence study validity. Required of Ph.D. students in nursing; open to master’s students with permission of the instructor. Three hours per week.

903a, Measurement of Health Variables The course focuses on theory of measurement, and on reliability and validity of research instruments—with emphasis on interaction of conceptual, methodological, and pragmatic considerations. An integration of seminar and lecture is employed. Required of Ph.D. students in nursing; open to advanced graduate students in other schools of the University. Three hours per week.

904a/b, Doctoral Independent Study This elective is initiated by the student and negotiated with faculty. The purpose is to allow in-depth pursuit of individual areas of interest and/or practice. A written proposal must be submitted and signed by the student, the faculty member(s), and the program chairperson.

[905b, Creating Method: Issues in Nursing Research This doctoral seminar explores the “cutting-edge” of methodological development in nursing research, through illustration of how methodological perspectives are conceptualized and systematically analyzed. The focus is on areas in which research leaders have not achieved consensus, areas in which existing consensus may be challenged, and areas of newly recognized needs for which appropriate methodology has not yet been developed. We address issues related to validity and threats to validity in clinical research; the experiences of participants in research; and the experiences of participants in research studies. Content changes with student interest. Prerequisite: 903a. Three hours per week. Not offered in 2013–2014]

907a/b, Dissertation Seminar 3 credit hours. This required doctoral course provides the student with advanced study and direction in research leading to development of the dissertation proposal and completion of the dissertation. Students are guided in the application of fundamentals of scientific writing and criticism. Required of Ph.D. students in nursing. Prerequisite: completion of the first year of doctoral study or the equivalent, including 901a; corequisite: 903a. Two and one-half hours every other week.

909a, Philosophical Foundations of Inquiry This course provides an overview and critical analysis of historical and contemporary science. The nature of science is also explored through the dialogue of competing philosophical perspectives such as logical positivism, historicism, and critical and post-structuralism. The influence of these competing philosophical perspectives on contemporary and future nursing science is explored. Specifically, underlying epistemological and ontological assumptions about the nature of truth, law, and the influence of gender, culture, and values on nursing’s past, current, and future theory and scientific inquiry are analyzed. Students are expected to examine how the various philosophical perspectives have the potential to influence their respective phenomenon of interest. Required of Ph.D. students in nursing. Three hours per week.

911, Doctoral Research Practicum The overall purpose of this seminar is to guide the student in acquiring an understanding of the role and responsibilities of the nurse researcher. Topics include scientific writing, peer review, components and development of a research plan, program of research and research career, funding and grantsmanship, presentation, publication, ethical considerations, collaboration and interdisciplinary research. Required of Ph.D. students in nursing for the first two years of doctoral study to coincide with their Graduate Research Assistant experience. One hour every other week.

913b, Theoretical Basis of Nursing Science This course examines the nature of scientific knowledge and the development of the conceptual and theoretical underpinnings of nursing science. The contribution to nursing science of various approaches to knowledge synthesis and theory development is emphasized. Specific approaches to concept/theory development and analysis are examined. Students are expected to complete a formal analysis of a concept or theory of interest to them. Required of Ph.D. students in nursing. Three hours per week.

[917, Advanced Statistics for Nursing Research This yearlong course starts with a review of basic descriptive and inferential statistics and advances to multivariate analyses most commonly used in nursing studies. The emphasis is on attaining a conceptual understanding of these statistical techniques, selecting appropriate techniques for a given clinical research problem, conducting computer-assisted data analyses, and correctly expressing the results of such analyses. The laboratory part of the course covers fundamentals of data management and statistical analysis and proceeds to the conduct of advanced analyses. The course emphasizes using programming language in SAS®; however, the menu-driven user interface in SAS, SPSS®, n-Query®, MS Excel®, and MS ACCESS® also are briefly covered. Required of Ph.D. students in nursing; open to master’s students with permission of the instructor. Three hours per week for academic year. Not offered in 2013–2014]

921b, Seminar on Research in Care of Patients with Diabetes This seminar focuses on the current state of the science in research on care of patients with diabetes mellitus and builds on knowledge gained in clinical courses in diabetes management. Specific attention is paid to issues related to interventions with high-risk cultural and ethnic groups. Research from nursing, medicine, and the social sciences is discussed by leaders in the field. Prerequisites: 769a and 901a, or the equivalent. Two hours per week. Offered every other year.

923a, Current Issues in Cardiovascular Nursing Research In this elective course students examine current issues in cardiovascular nursing research. Topics change each year to reflect the current state of the science. Prerequisite: clinical background in cardiovascular nursing and doctoral-level standing; open to others with permission of the instructor. Two hours every other week and thirty hours at the Scientific Sessions of the American Heart Association. Three hours per week. Offered every other year.

925b, Qualitative Research in Nursing This course introduces the student to major approaches to qualitative research. Selected topics related to the design, conduct, and reporting of qualitative research are addressed. Emphasis is on the appropriate use of qualitative methods and differences across qualitative approaches. The course includes firsthand experience with data collection and analysis. Required of Ph.D. students in nursing. Three hours per week.

[927b, Seminar on Research in Care of People with Cancer or at Risk for Cancer and Their Families This seminar focuses on current state-of-the-science research in care of people with cancer or at risk for cancer and their families. Specific attention is paid to factors associated with quality-of-life outcomes (e.g., functional status, and affect) and high-risk groups (e.g., family history, ethnicity, and socioeconomic class). Research from nursing, medicine, and the social sciences is discussed. Two hours per week. One additional credit may be obtained by the submission of a publishable paper. Not offered in 2013–2014]

929b, Ethical Conduct of Clinical Research This course introduces major concepts in the ethical conduct of clinical research from the perspective of the advanced practice nurse and the nurse-researcher. National and international ethical codes for research and regulatory requirements are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the protection of vulnerable populations and community-based research, including international research. Required of Ph.D. students in nursing in the first year; open to others with permission of the instructor. One hour per week.

[941a, Health Policy, Leadership, and Systems This course addresses salient issues in health policy and the challenges to linking research and clinical care with public and private policy agendas. The course covers the following topics: health care delivery systems; policy and political factors that affect access to, financing, delivery, and quality of care; challenges to evidence-based policy and the dissemination of research findings to policy and community-based leaders. It also includes theories of leadership and policy change relevant to students’ research topics. Critical thinking, problem-solving skills, and research-based analysis are integrated throughout the course. A major written assignment that will be suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed journal is required. Prerequisite: students must pass a test based on the online Yale University School of Nursing Health Policy Module. Required of Ph.D. students in nursing. Three hours per week. Not offered in 2013–2014]

943a, Self- and Family Management of Vulnerable Populations This course examines major conceptualizations of health and illness, and self- and family management and the research supporting these conceptualizations. Emphasis is placed on the link between health and illness self-management, with particular emphasis on vulnerable populations, and related concepts such as symptom distress, self-efficacy and coping, and the contributions of risk and protective factors to self-management. Self-management is considered from both an individual and family perspective, and sociocultural influences on self-management are explored. Required of Ph.D. students in nursing. Three hours per week.

943b, Methods of Intervention Development and Testing This first-year seminar focuses on the research methods necessary for the understanding, development, and testing of interventions in the management of health and illness. Content includes the use of theoretical, qualitative, survey, and mixed-method approaches to understand the factors associated with management of health and illness and the development of bio-behavioral interventions. The second half of the course focuses on methodological issues in carrying out clinical intervention research. Required of Ph.D. students in nursing; open to others with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: completion of 901a and 943a. Three hours per week.

955a, Ethical Analysis in Health Care 3.5 credit hours (.5 application-practice experiences related to course content). This course explores influential theories of health care ethics and draws on them to identify and analyze both common and complex ethical challenges in health care settings and systems, with attention to domestic and global concerns. Through readings, writing assignments, case study discussions, and projects, participants develop critical thinking, critical writing, ethical reflection, and group process skills integral to leadership in ethics, with close attention to the role of the nurse-leader in ethics education and organizational policy development. The course is designed for individuals who have significant clinical and administrative experience. Required of D.N.P. students in the first year. Four monthly three-hour on-campus sessions combined with Web-based instruction. N. Berlinger

957b, Evidence 3.5 credit hours (.5 application-practice experiences related to course content). Evidence is that which enhances the reasonableness or justification for our beliefs and practices. When we apply this concept of evidence to health care, we engage in five evidentiary tasks: we ask answerable questions about what is evidence for that about which we are concerned; we acquire that evidence and appraise it; we apply this evidence to that about which we are concerned; and we evaluate this application. In this course, we explore the contemporary concept of evidence-based practice in its philosophical, scientific, and historical contexts and build on it to develop competence in applying the five evidentiary tasks to nursing practice in the clinical, policy, and leadership arenas. Required of D.N.P. students in the first year. Taught in intensive mode in the winter session. D.N.P. faculty

963b, Transformational Leadership in Professional Education 4 credit hours (2 application-practice experiences related to course content). This course focuses on innovative methods in professional education. Transformational leadership includes the ability to develop educational goals and purpose that aim to fully engage learners in the teaching-learning process. The course includes a review and critique of the principles of transformational leadership within higher education. Students are expected to critique and to utilize the principles of transformational leadership in higher education to create a student-centered teaching/learning environment. In addition, they compare and contrast the principles of transformational education with traditional principles of teaching/learning. Students are also expected to integrate the principles of transformational education with innovative technological strategies. Students meet with assigned faculty during the first on-campus session to determine individualized course progression through additional modules and assigned application hours depending upon past teaching experience and formal education courses. Required of D.N.P. students in the first year. J. Coviello

967c, Theory and Application of Project Management 2 credit hours. Whether imagining, planning, leading, or resourcing a project, senior nurses in any setting including within multidisciplinary teams require a keen understanding of each step. Because health care–related projects can be in clinical practice, in the boardroom, in legislatures, or in advocacy groups, the student should recognize that the theories and principles are universal and processes are flexible. Students gain facility in the software, tools, and communication techniques, as well as an understanding of how to lead interprofessional teams from project inception to completion. The tools and processes learned in this course will support the work toward the subsequent Capstone experience. Taught in intensive mode in the summer session. D.N.P. faculty

971a, Health Care Policy, Politics, and Process 4 credit hours and 1 applied credit hour. This course is built upon the understanding that health care delivery is the transformation of health science into health service. Students increase their aptitude in the three Ps—policy, politics, and process—in order to shape health care delivery changes. Policy, politics, and processes occur in organizational, state, tribal, and federal spaces. In this era of sweeping health reform, it is imperative that students understand the players, the interactions, and the routes to change. The class tracks and analyzes contemporary legislative and regulatory proposals, court opinions, and think-tank documents. Required of D.N.P. students in the second year. M. Moss

977b, The Business of Health Care 3.5 credit hours (0.5 applied credit hour). Health care as business is an essential context for nursing leaders to understand and shape through practice and operations. The emphasis in this course is on using data and information systems for financial decision making in planning, operations, legislation, insurance, and public policy, ultimately for the improvement of care delivery. Models of care such as nurse-managed centers, federally qualified health centers, medical homes, and their evolving payment structures are featured. Readings and online resources support in-class analysis through case studies, brief projects, interaction with distinguished guests, and other exercises. Required of D.N.P. students in the first year. Taught in intensive mode. J. Kunisch

981b, Organizational Behavior and Leadership: Applications in Health Care 4.5 credit hours (1 applied credit hour). In this course students explore and critically analyze classic and contemporary leadership theories, models, and research from the sociological, psychological, organizational, and business literature as the scientific basis for leadership and change in health care organizations. The emphasis is on systems thinking and quality improvement in health care delivery, policy, and regulatory environments. Students use the translational literature in nursing and medicine along with emerging health reform efforts (e.g., interprofessional collaboration initiatives, “centering” initiatives, medical homes, future of nursing) as supplements to leadership case material. As part of the course students participate in a mentored leadership initiative in a clinical, educational, regulatory, or policy setting, resulting in a final paper that applies the relevant leadership concepts from the course to an analysis of the leadership initiative. Required of D.N.P. students. J. Krauss

985c, Achieving Health Equity 2 credit hours. This course seeks to enhance students’ knowledge and attitudes about what, who, how, why, and when barriers toward achieving health equity occur for those needing health care and those providing health care. Achieving health equity happens when barriers to care and to optimum health are prevented, managed, or removed. Road blocks to health equity may be intentionally placed, or they may be unintentional consequences of organizational, state, tribal, or federal policies and law. With imminent health reform, there will be thousands of opportunities to lift barriers or to facilitate health. Students are encouraged to be active in finding these opportunities and begin to add their voices to the process of change. Historical and geopolitical contexts are also explored. Required of D.N.P. students prior to graduation. Taught in intensive mode in the summer. M. Moss

989c, Capstone Seminar 2 credit hours. In this course, students identify and develop the project to be conducted as the Capstone experience. Theories of evidence and of project planning guide individual project development. Review of extant knowledge as research and clinical literature, policy documents, white papers, and the like lead to formulation of a plan for conduct of the Capstone. Required of D.N.P. students. This course is taught in intensive mode. D.N.P. faculty and others.

999, Capstone 10 credit hours. Students select among a variety of options for completing the Capstone project, which is intended to draw together learning from all previous courses and prior professional experiences. The options include: a practice change project; a systematic or integrative literature review; a policy/practice case and analysis; a research project; a precepted, executive-level experience and analysis. The Capstone includes identification of the problem or issue, including policy context; review and critique of evidence associated with the issues or problems; design and conduct of an approach to the problem or issue that has the possibility of causing or promoting change; evaluation of both the project and the journey it has taken. At least one publishable paper is expected. Required of D.N.P. students in the final year; individual supervision or precepting to be arranged.

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Courses in Yale College

Advanced courses in various departments of Yale College may be elected by students enrolled in the School of Nursing if schedule conflicts prevent them from obtaining particular course content on the graduate level. To enroll in a course offered by Yale College, students must first obtain permission from their adviser, the instructor of the course, and the departmental director of undergraduate studies. The elected course must be listed on the student’s School of Nursing course schedule within the prescribed period for course registration.

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Courses in Yale University Graduate and Professional Schools

Students in the School of Nursing may elect courses offered by the various departments of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and other professional schools of the University. In the past, students have elected courses from the School of Medicine; courses in Sociology, Psychology, and Anthropology at the Graduate School; and courses offered by the Schools of Art, Divinity, Law, Management, Music, and Public Health. Students are encouraged to consult the bulletins of these schools, in which course offerings are listed and described, to seek content that may be relevant to their individual educational goals. Subject to the approval of the student’s adviser, the instructor of the course, and the departmental director of graduate studies, the elected course must be listed on the student’s School of Nursing course schedule within the prescribed period for course registration. Students should also check with the registrar of the individual school in which the course is elected for registration procedures specific to that school.

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