Yale University.Calendar.Directories.

Departments and Sections

This section provides information for all departments and some sections in the School of Medicine.

Courses designated a meet in the fall term only. Courses designated b meet in the spring term only. Courses enclosed in brackets are not offered in the current academic year.

Faculty listings reflect approved appointments effective April 5, 2014.

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Anesthesiology

TMP 3, 203.785.2802

http://medicine.yale.edu/anesthesiology

Professors P.G. Barash, C.A. Brandt (Emergency Medicine), F.R. Braveman, J.G. Collins (Emeritus), J. Ehrenwerth (Emeritus), R.L. Hines (Chair), L.M. Kitahata (Emeritus), C.J. Kopriva (Emeritus), R. Lagasse, R.H. LaMotte, J. Lichtor, P.L. Miller (Medical Informatics), L.E. Niklason, T.H. Oh (Emeritus), A.C. Perrino, T.D. Rafferty (Emeritus), S.H. Rosenbaum, W. Rosenblatt, K.J. Ruskin, K.H. Shelley, R.N. Shiffman (Pediatrics), D.G. Silverman, R.S. Sinatra (Emeritus)

Associate Professors S. Akhtar, A.A. Alian, K. Cheung (Emergency Medicine), S. Garwood, T.M. Halaszynski, V. Kurup, L.L. Maerz (Surgery), G.F. McCloskey, G.C. Michaud (Medicine), W.M. Popescu, R. Ramani, J.J. Schwartz, N. Vadivelu

Assistant Professors C. Al Haddadin, R.T. Aouad, S.I. Assaad, T. Banack, E.R. Beaudoin, M.E. Blessing, S. Chatterjee, N. Chawla, M. Cortes, S. Dabu-Bondoc, R. Deshpande, J. Farmer, J. Feinleib, L. Freudzon, D.J. Gaal, M. Ganatra, T.J. Golembeski, J. Golia, L. Grecu, A.S. Haddadin, L.E. Helgeson, K. Hernandez, A. Herrera, N.F. Holt, M.G. Hrycelak, L.H. Kwan, K. Labib, M. Leonova, J. Li, M. Liu, S. Liu, A.M. Lobo, D. Lombardo, S.M. Luczycki, D. Lujic, A. Malik, R. Marando, K.E. Marschall, V. Matei, J. McCarthy, P.M. Meeks, H. Mikhael, R.K. Modak, T. Myslajek, C. Noto, J. Oliver, L. Oliver, A.D. Oprea, J.T. Pan, M. Punjala, I. Rock, R.M. Romero, M.J. Rose, A. Ruskis, J. Santoro, J. Schneider, R.B. Schonberger, C. Schulten, R. Schulten, R. Sekhar, J. Sherman, D. Snegovskikh, J. Sramcik, R.G. Stout, P. Tanka, H.E. Tantawy, J. Tao, D.M. Thomas, I. Vaitkeviciute, D.W. Vaughn, C.A. Voets, R. Wardhan, X. Xu, A. Yamani, J. Zafar, M. Zhang (Adjunct), G.X. Zhou, Q. Zhu

Instructors C. Bartels, J. Bourassa, R.S. Brunetti, L. Calo, T. Cooke, M.S. Cosgrove, D. Diaz, M.L. Flaherty, C. Garceau, O. Geismar, C. Gibbs, N. Guay, J. Heath, L. Hovagim, N. Hymel, C. Ippolito, E.A. Jakab, R. Kyle, A.A. Lamacchia, H. Manzolillo, K. McClintock, A. Mercurio, M. Michaud, M. Montefusco, C. Natividad Le, D. O’Mara, D.D. Pannella, M. Paulin, A. Phillips, D. Reilly, J. Roman, J. Sacco, N. Saidi, H.N. Syombathy

Senior Research Scientists J.G. Collins, T.D. Rafferty

Research Scientists N. Rajeevan, F.G. Sayward

Associate Research Scientists P.H. Addy, S.J. Frawley, M. Ghaedi, L. Gui, S.J. Jarad, T. Kawecki, P.G. Mutalik, H. Qian, H. Rajeevan, M.A. Shifman (Medical Informatics), S. Sundaram, R. Wang

Clinical Professor J.D. Katz

Associate Clinical Professors J. Charchaflieh, K.S. Chung, L.P. Kirschenbaum, A.L. Mandel, E.K. Prokop, S.B. Stone, A.D. Weinstock

Assistant Clinical Professors C. Ayoub, J. Kim, M. Lomanto, L. Wang, J.C. Weinberg, T. Wong

Clinical Instructors M.M. Abreu, L.A. Carlson, A.M. Deshpande (Medical Informatics), M. Dudley, W.J. Hancock, K.M. Hurd, T. Jacobson, N. Kashyap, M.A. Kondor, M.M. Madonick, B. McLean, L. Orozco, L. Pettway, S. Stebbins, P.G. Thomas

Lecturers C. Bruce, A.M. Deshpande (Medical Informatics), V.N. Garla, Z. Gong, B. Kaplan, S. LaCoursiere, P. Nadkarni, H. Robins, E. Zador

ANES 104, Anesthesiology Advanced Clinical Elective Individualized program of instruction in anesthesia subspecialties, including cardiovascular, neurosurgical, obstetrical, and pediatric anesthesia. One or two students every four weeks. Director: S. Akhtar

ANES 141, Anesthesiology Laboratory Research Elective Participation in ongoing research by department faculty involving clinical responses to drugs affecting cardiopulmonary, central nervous and autonomic nervous system, noninvasive cardiovascular monitoring, perioperative coagulation, and other topics. The development of individual research projects is also encouraged. Students interested in complementary approaches to pain management, such as acupuncture, should contact S.-M. Wang. One student every four weeks; additional time recommended. Director: D.G. Silverman

ANES 142, Anesthesiology Clinical Research Elective Laboratory research projects focused on the neurophysiology and neuropharmacology of the sensations of pain and itch, and on vascular biology. One or two students every four weeks. Director: L.E. Niklason; R.H. LaMotte, C. Ma, K.H. Shelley, D.G. Silverman, S.-M. Wang

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Cell Biology

SHM C207, 203.737.5603

www.cellbiology.yale.edu

Professors C.G. Burd, M.J. Caplan (Cellular & Molecular Physiology), L. Cooley (Genetics), P. Cresswell (Immunobiology), P. De Camilli, J.E. Galán (Microbial Pathogenesis), F. Gorelick (Medicine), C. Hashimoto, J.D. Jamieson, D.S. Krause (Laboratory Medicine), T.L. Lentz (Emeritus), H. Lin, V.T. Marchesi (Pathology), M.S. Mooseker (Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology), M.H. Nathanson (Medicine), K. Neugebauer (Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry), T.D. Pollard (Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology), J.E. Rothman (Chair), M.A. Schwartz (Medicine), M. Simons (Medicine), S.L. Wolin

Associate Professors J. Bewersdorf, J.S. Bogan (Medicine), D.A. Calderwood (Pharmacology), D. Colón-Ramos, E.R. Dufresne (Engineering & Applied Science), V. Greco (Genetics), T. Melia, K.M. Reinisch, D.K. Toomre, Y. Zhang

Assistant Professors D. Baddeley, T. Carroll, S.M. Ferguson, S. Guo, M. King, C. Lin, C.P. Lusk, M. Mariappan, P.A. Takizawa, J. Yao

Senior Research Scientists T.L. Lentz, A.M. Vignery (Orthopaedics & Rehabilitation)

Research Scientists X. Chen, S.S. Krishnakumar, G. Lavieu, X.N. Liu, C. Qiu

Associate Research Scientists S.J. An, S.M. Auclair, J. Baskin, Y. Cai, E. Cheng, R.J. Chi, P. Colombi, J. Dancourt, A.R. Ferguson, X. Ge, L. Geng, C. Juliano, F. Li, N. Liu, M.C. Llaguno, F. Pincet, H. Qi, S. Sim, N. Vishnoi, T. Watanabe, F. Wu, Y. Wu, Z. Xi, W. Xu, M. Zhong, J. Zhu

CBIO 502, Molecules to Systems This course is designed to provide medical students with a current and comprehensive review of biologic structure and function at the cellular, tissue, and organ system levels. Areas covered include structure and organization of cells; regulation of the cell cycle and mitosis; protein biosynthesis and membrane targeting; cell motility and the cytoskeleton; signal transduction; cell adhesion; cell and tissue organization of organ systems. Clinical correlation sessions, which illustrate the contributions of cell biology to specific medical problems, are interspersed in the lecture schedule. Histophysiology laboratories provide practical experience with an understanding of exploring cell and tissue structure. The course is offered only to M.D. and M.D./Ph.D. students. It runs for three terms from September to December of the next academic year to coincide with the School of Medicine curriculum. Registration and the release of grades will take place in the third term. The course is equivalent to two graduate credits. P.A. Takizawa, F. Gorelick, J.D. Jamieson, T.L. Lentz, and faculty

CBIO 601a/b, Molecular and Cellular Basis of Human Disease The course emphasizes the connections between diseases and basic science using a lecture and seminar format. It is designed for students who are committed to a career in medical research, those who are considering such a career, or students who wish to explore scientific topics in depth. The first half of the course is organized in four- to five-week blocks that topically parallel CBIO 502a/b. Examples of blocks from past years include “Diseases of protein folding” and “Diseases of ion channels.” Each topic is introduced with a lecture given by the faculty. The lecture is followed by sessions in which students review relevant manuscripts under the supervision of a faculty mentor. The second half of the course focuses on the relationship of basic science to disease processes while emphasizing translational and clinical research. In addition, sessions are devoted to academic careers and cover subjects such as obtaining an academic position, promotions, and grant writing. The course is open to M.D. and M.D./Ph.D. students who are taking or have taken CBIO 502a/b. Student evaluations are based on attendance, participation in group discussions, formal presentations, and a written review of an NIH proposal. The course runs from September to mid-May and is equivalent to two graduate credits. F. Gorelick, J.D. Jamieson, and faculty

CBIO 602a/MB&B 602a/MCDB 602a, Molecular Cell Biology A comprehensive introduction to the molecular and mechanistic aspects of cell biology for graduate students in all programs. Emphasizes fundamental issues of cellular organization, regulation, biogenesis, and function at the molecular level. S.L. Wolin, M.J. Caplan, T. Carroll, C. Crews, P. De Camilli, M. King, T. Melia, I.-H. Park, J.E. Rothman, M.A. Schwartz

CBIO 603a/MCDB 603a, Seminar in Molecular Cell Biology A graduate-level seminar course in modern cell biology. The class is devoted to the reading and critical evaluation of classical and current papers. The topics are coordinated with the CBIO 602a lecture schedule. Thus, concurrent enrollment in CBIO 602a is required. M. King, M.J. Caplan, T. Carroll, C. Crews, P. De Camilli, T. Melia, J.E. Rothman, M.A. Schwartz, S.L. Wolin

CBIO 604b, Systems Cell Biology Introduction to the organization and function of cells within complex multicellular systems as encountered in the human body. Covers major tissues and organs as well as the cardiovascular, immune, and nervous systems, with special emphasis on the molecular and cellular bases of developmental processes and human diseases. Lectures supplemented by electronic-based tutorials on the histology of tissues and organs. C. Hashimoto, D. Colón-Ramos, and faculty

CBIO 606b, Advanced Topics in Cell Biology This seminar course, which meets once weekly, covers advanced topics in cell biology. Each topic is spread over two or three sessions, which start with an introductory overview and are followed by a discussion of key papers led by an expert in the field. C.P. Lusk, C.G. Burd, S.M. Ferguson

CBIO 611b, Vascular Cell Biology This course introduces the structure and organ-level physiology of the vascular system, then covers in greater depth the development, regulation, mechanics, and pathology of blood vessels. The major focus is on cellular and molecular mechanisms. The course includes both lectures and reading and discussion of recent literature. M.A. Schwartz and faculty

CBIO 655a/GENE 655a, Stem Cells: Biology and Application This course is designed for first-year or second-year students to learn the fundamentals of stem cell biology and to gain familiarity with current research in the field. The course is presented in a lecture and discussion format based on primary literature. Topics include stem cell concepts, methodologies for stem cell research, embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells, cloning and stem cell reprogramming, and clinical applications of stem cell research. Prerequisites: undergraduate-level cell biology, molecular biology, and genetics. I.-H. Park, H. Lin, and faculty

CBIO 701b, Illuminating Cellular Function Introduction to the principles and practical methods of live cell imaging. Covers principles of fluorescent microscopy (including genetically encoded probes and physiological indicators), image formation, image detection, and image analysis. Includes hands-on demonstrations of state-of-the-art instrumentation, such as video-rate confocal and super-resolution “nanoscopes.” D.K. Toomre, J. Bewersdorf, and faculty

CBIO 900a/GENE 900a/MCDB 900a, First-Year Introduction to Research—Grant Writing and Scientific Communication Grant writing, scientific communication, and laboratory rotation talks for Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development track students. S. Holley and faculty

CBIO 901b/GENE 901b/MCDB 901b, First-Year Introduction to Research—Ethics: Scientific Integrity in Biomedical Research Ethics and laboratory rotation talks for Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development track students. J. Bewersdorf

CBIO 903a or b, Reading Course in Cell Biology Independent study of specific topics in cell biology through directed reading of the literature under faculty supervision. Student may choose any topic and any Yale faculty subject to approval by the Cell Biology DGS. Open to Cell Biology students, and to students in other departments with approval from their respective DGS. Term paper required. K.M. Reinisch

CBIO 911a/GENE 911a/MCDB 911a, First Laboratory Rotation First laboratory rotation for Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development track students. C. Crews

CBIO 912b/GENE 912b/MCDB 912b, Second Laboratory Rotation Second laboratory rotation for Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development track students. C. Crews

CBIO 913b/GENE 913b/MCDB 913b, Third Laboratory Rotation Third laboratory rotation for Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development track students. C. Crews

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Cellular and Molecular Physiology

SHM B147, 203.785.4041

http://medicine.yale.edu/physiology

Professors P.S. Aronson (Medicine), A. Bordey (Neurosurgery), E.L. Boulpaep, T.H. Brown (Psychology), C. Canessa, L.G. Cantley (Medicine), M.J. Caplan (Chair), N. Carrasco, W.K. Chandler (Emeritus), L.B. Cohen, M.E. Egan (Pediatrics), B.E. Ehrlich (Pharmacology), A. Eichmann (Medicine), B. Forbush, J.P. Geibel (Surgery), G.H. Giebisch (Emeritus), J.F. Hoffman (Emeritus), L.K. Kaczmarek (Pharmacology), G. Lister (Pediatrics), M. Nitabach, V.A. Pieribone, P.A. Preisig (Medicine), W.M. Saltzman (Engineering & Applied Science), J. Santos-Sacchi (Surgery), G.I. Shulman (Medicine), F.J. Sigworth, C.L. Slayman, C.W. Slayman (Genetics), S. Tomita, T. Wang, F.S. Wright (Medicine), L.H. Young (Medicine), D. Zenisek, Z. Zhou (Ophthalmology & Visual Science)

Associate Professors N.A. Ameen (Pediatrics), I.E. De Araujo (Psychiatry), J.B. Demb (Ophthalmology & Visual Science), S. Ishibe (Medicine), R.G. Kibbey (Medicine), X. Yang (Comparative Medicine)

Assistant Professors N.A. Addy (Psychiatry), S. Bragiantsev, S.G. Campbell (Biomedical Engineering), G. de Lartigue, E. Gracheva, E. Karatekin, J.J. Rinehart, S.K. Singh, C. Thoreen

Senior Research Scientists G.H. Giebisch, J.F. Hoffman, D.P. Zecevic

Associate Research Scientists C.X. Bleau, B.A. Davis, X. Jin, M. Kunst, C. Lv, M.A. Reyna, A. Rivetta, M.M. Tomita, Y. Yang

C&MP 500, From Molecules to Systems: Medical Physiology This course is open only to first-year medical students. The purpose of the course is to understand complex physiological processes at the level of component molecules, cells, specific tissues, organs, organ systems, and the whole body. Lectures cover human medical physiology in eleven modules: Cell Physiology/Membrane Transport, Nerve, Muscle, Metabolism, Blood, Cardiovascular, Respiratory, Kidney, Gastrointestinal, Endocrine, and Reproduction. Two major themes emerge during the course: (1) the human body employs a multitude of approaches for regulating the environment around its individual cells, and (2) these individual cells perform tasks necessary for sustaining life in the whole organism. E.L. Boulpaep and staff

C&MP 550aU/ENAS 550aU/MCDB 550aU/PHAR 550a, Physiological Systems The course develops a foundation in human physiology by examining the homeostasis of vital parameters within the body, and the biophysical properties of cells, tissues, and organs. Basic concepts in cell and membrane physiology are synthesized through exploring the function of skeletal, smooth, and cardiac muscle. The physical basis of blood flow, mechanisms of vascular exchange, cardiac performance, and regulation of overall circulatory function are discussed. Respiratory physiology explores the mechanics of ventilation, gas diffusion, and acid-base balance. Renal physiology examines the formation and composition of urine and the regulation of electrolyte, fluid, and acid-base balance. Organs of the digestive system are discussed from the perspective of substrate metabolism and energy balance. Hormonal regulation is applied to metabolic control and to calcium, water, and electrolyte balance. The biology of nerve cells is addressed with emphasis on synaptic transmission and simple neuronal circuits within the central nervous system. The special senses are considered in the framework of sensory transduction. Weekly discussion sections provide a forum for in-depth exploration of topics. Graduate students evaluate research findings through literature review and weekly meetings with the instructor. E.L. Boulpaep, W.M. Saltzman

C&MP 560bU/ENAS 570bU/MCDB 560bU/PHAR 560b, Cellular and Molecular Physiology: Molecular Machines in Human Disease The course focuses on understanding the processes that transfer molecules across membranes at the cellular, molecular, biophysical, and physiological levels. Students learn about the different classes of molecular machines that mediate membrane transport, generate electrical currents, or perform mechanical displacement. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between the molecular structures of membrane proteins and their individual functions. The interactions among transport proteins in determining the physiological behaviors of cells and tissues are also stressed. Molecular motors are introduced and their mechanical relationship to cell function is explored. Students read papers from the scientific literature that establish the connections between mutations in genes encoding membrane proteins and a wide variety of human genetic diseases. E.L. Boulpaep, F.J. Sigworth

C&MP 570b/NBIO 570b, Sensory Physiology The course provides an overview of the mammalian special sensory systems, including molecular and cellular bases of vision, audition, taste, olfaction, and somatosensation. Faculty with focus in those areas lead presentations and discussions on peripheral and central mechanisms. Psychophysical aspects of sensation are introduced. D. Zenisek, J. Santos-Sacchi, Z. Zhou

C&MP 600, Medical Physiology Case Conferences Two-term course taught in groups of ten to twelve students by the same group leader(s) throughout the year. Workshop format permits students to apply basic concepts of physiology to clinical syndromes and disease processes. Students are expected to participate actively in a weekly discussion of a clinical case that illustrates principles of human physiology and pathophysiology at the whole-body, system, organ, cellular, or molecular level. Prerequisites: C&MP 550a and permission of the instructor. Credit for full year only. E.L. Boulpaep and staff

C&MP 610, Medical Research Scholars Program: Mentored Clinical Experience The goals of the course are to introduce MRSP students to aspects of clinically important human diseases. Students explore each disease over three one-and-one-half-hour sessions led by a clinician-scientist who is an expert in the relevant organ system. Students explore two disease processes per term. The first of the three sessions is devoted to a discussion of the clinical presentation, natural history, pathology, epidemiology, treatment, and prognosis of the disease process. During this session students have the opportunity to view gross or microscopic specimens of diseased tissue in association with members of the Pathology faculty. Students are assigned readings in pathology, pathophysiology, and clinical texts to prepare for the first class session. The second session focuses on translational aspects of the disease process. Students read and present papers relevant to the molecular basis of the disease and cutting-edge approaches to its therapy. In the third session students meet with patients who have experienced the disease and/or visit and explore facilities associated with diagnosis and treatment of the disease process. Prior to the third session students receive guidance as to what they will observe and how to approach the experience; and at the end of the session, the group discusses its thoughts and impressions. Students are expected to prepare for sessions, to participate actively, and to be scrupulously respectful of patients and patient facilities. R.R. Russell, M.J. Caplan

C&MP 620b/NBIO 610b, Fundamentals in Neurophysiology The course is designed for students who wish to gain a theoretical and practical knowledge of modern neurophysiology. Graduate students specializing in neurophysiology and non-neurophysiology are encouraged to attend, as the course begins at a very basic level and progresses to more complicated topics. Topics include properties of ion channels, firing properties of neurons, synaptic transmission, and neurophysiology methodology. V.A. Pieribone, F.J. Sigworth

C&MP 630a/PATH 680a/PHAR 502a, Seminar in Molecular Medicine, Pharmacology, and Physiology Readings and discussion on a diverse range of current topics in molecular medicine, pharmacology, and physiology. The class emphasizes analysis of primary research literature and development of presentation and writing skills. Contemporary articles are assigned on a related topic every week, and a student leads discussions with input from faculty who are experts in the topic area. The overall goal is to cover a specific topic of medical relevance (e.g., cancer, neurodegeneration) from the perspective of three primary disciplines (i.e., physiology: normal function; pathology: abnormal function; and pharmacology: intervention). D. Nguyen, T. Boggon

C&MP 650/PATH 660/PHAR 580, The Responsible Conduct of Research Organized to foster discussion, the course is taught by faculty in the Pharmacology, Pathology, and Physiology departments and two or three senior graduate students. Each session is based on case studies from primary literature, reviews, and two texts: Francis Macrina’s Scientific Integrity and Kathy Barker’s At the Bench. Each week, students are required to submit a reaction paper discussing the reading assignment. Students take turns leading the class discussion; a final short paper on a hot topic in bioethics is required. B.E. Ehrlich, D. Braddock

C&MP 710b/MB&B 710b4, Electron Cryo-Microscopy for Protein Structure Determination Understanding cellular function requires structural and biochemical studies at an ever-increasing level of complexity. The course is an introduction to the concepts and applications of high-resolution electron cryo-microscopy. This rapidly emerging new technique is the only method that allows biological macromolecules to be studied at all levels of resolution from cellular organization to near atomic detail. Counts as 0.5 credit. F.J. Sigworth, C.V. Sindelar

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Child Study Center

NIHB 208, 203.785.2540

http://medicine.yale.edu/childstudy

Professors H. Blumberg (Psychiatry), J.P. Comer, V. Gallo (Adjunct), E.L. Grigorenko, S.L. Kagan (Adjunct), Z. Kain (Adjunct), A.E. Kazdin (Psychology), R.A. King, J.F. Leckman, J.M. Leventhal (Pediatrics), P.J. Lombroso, S.S. Luthar (Adjunct), R.W. Makuch (Public Health), S. Marans, A.S. Martin, L.C. Mayes, R. Paul (Adjunct), K. Pelphrey, M. Picciotto (Psychiatry), M.N. Potenza (Psychiatry), L. Sadler (Nursing), J.E. Schowalter (Emeritus), S.E. Shaywitz (Pediatrics), W.K. Silverman, R. Sinha (Psychiatry), D.L. Snow (Psychiatry), P. Snyder (Adjunct), S.M. Southwick (Psychiatry), M.W. State (Adjunct), J.K. Tebes (Psychiatry), F. Vaca (Emergency Medicine), F.M. Vaccarino, F.R. Volkmar, J. Woolston, H. Zhang (Public Health)

Associate Professors S.J. Berkowitz (Adjunct), K. Chawarska, B.W. Forsyth (Pediatrics), W.S. Gilliam, S.M. Horwitz (Public Health), J. Kaufman (Psychiatry), Y. Kim (Adjunct), T.J. McMahon (Psychiatry), J.C. McPartland, E.C. Miguel (Adjunct), C. Pittenger (Psychiatry), D. Stubbe, N.E. Suchman (Psychiatry), E. Viding (Adjunct)

Assistant Professors B. Barbot (Adjunct), M.H. Bloch, D. Bridgett (Adjunct), P.R. Britto, A.L. Close, M.J. Crowley, D.W. Evans (Adjunct), R. Feldman (Adjunct), T.V. Fernandez, P.G. Fischman (Adjunct), I. Gordon (Adjunct), N. Landi (Adjunct), E.R. Lebowitz, P. Luyten (Adjunct), I. Park (Genetics), Y.B. Poncin, Z. Qayyum (Psychiatry), A. Raefski (Adjunct), J.A. Reich (Adjunct), B. Reichow (Adjunct), M.C. Rosario-Campos (Adjunct), V.V. Ruchkin (Adjunct), F. Shic, M.V. Smith (Psychiatry), H.E. Stevens (Adjunct), C.S. Stover (Adjunct), D. Sukhodolsky, B. Vander Wyk, P. Ventola, V. Weersing (Adjunct), A. Westphal (Psychiatry), M. Yazgan (Adjunct)

Instructors C. Moreno, L.E. Taylor

Senior Research Scientist G.M. Anderson

Research Scientist V.R. Seitz

Associate Research Scientists M. Akbar, A. Amiri, K.M. Balestracci, L.L. Booth, F.E. Brown, L. Cardona-Wolenski, G. Coppola, C.J. Cutter (Medicine), C. Dauser, P.S. El-Fishawy, H.M. Fichtenholtz, M. Finn-Stevenson, M. Goslin, M.A. Goyette-Ewing, A.R. Gupta (Pediatrics), H. Hahn, L. Hart, E.J. Hoffman, S. Kim, K. Koenig, P. Kotapurathu kurup, T. Liu, S.L. Macari, C. Marin, O.Y. Naumova, S.S. Nicholls, A. Ponguta, K.K. Powell, C.R. Reyes, H.J. Rutherford, S.S. Stahl, K.D. Tsatsanis, T. Vanderwal, E.M. Warnick, J. Wu, J. Xu

Clinical Professors J. Adnopoz, R. Angoff (Pediatrics), T.W. Downey, P. Fonagy, A.S. Kaufman, N. Laor, K.D. Pruett, D. Reiss, E.R. Shapiro, A. Slade

Associate Clinical Professors A.J. Avni-Singer (Pediatrics), M.W. Azeem, S. Boltax-Stern, C. Canny (Pediatrics), L. Combrinck-Graham, K. Dahl, J.B. Ferholt, N.M. Haynes, D. Koenigsberg, J.G. Narad, E.A. Perlswig, M. Target, A.P. Thies, P. Van Wattum

Assistant Clinical Professors H.A. Allen, E.R. Arzubi, D.M. Aversa, M. Best, D. Bober, L.A. Bogen, S. Brooke, J.T. Brown, C.F. Califano, J.F. Chapman, P.B. Chappell, J. Chilton, J.T. Collins, B. Cook, K.S. D’Eramo, L.N. Dennehy, P.S. El-Fishawy, C. Emmons, C. Epstein, G.E. Epstein-Wilf, S.E. Fitzpatrick, D. Flanagan, J. Fowler, Y. Fradkin, R.P. Franks, M.G. Fromm, G.D. Gammon, S. Gossart-Walker, R.M. Greenbaum, F.X. Gregory, K.E. Hanson, B.T. Harel, A.G. Hess, A.S. Holmes, I.R. Jennings, R.J. Jou, H.P. Kahn, M.D. Kaplan, B.A. Keyes, B. Kleine, A. Landeros-Weisenberger, J.M. Lang, L. Lavalley, P.K. Leebens, J.W. Loomis, G.L. Lopez-Cohen, D.I. Lowell, A.S. Lustbader, M. Lustick, J.A. Madigan, N.T. Malberg, J.P. Marachi, R.S. McWilliam, J.C. Meyers, E.S. Millman, C. Mills, Z. Mohiuddin, N. Moss, S.F. Nagler, F.J. Ninivaggi, B.F. Nordhaus, M.J. Palmieri, J.F. Poll, M.D. Powers, I. Qureshi, D.R. Rau (Psychiatry), J. Reiss, R.A. Ritvo, E. Rodriguez-Keyes, R. Salah, D.A. Sasso, A.G. Smaller, K.W. Sondergaard, R. Sotsky, P.K. Thomas, J.G. Tillman, J. Webb, S. Werblood, J.M. Wolf, M. Wudarsky, V.J. Zecchini, L.D. Zimmerman

Clinical Instructors P. Aguayo, J.M. Ambrosino (Pediatrics), J.E. Arias, A. Aujla, M. Berkman, A. Bolander, C. Conway, J.D. Cunningham, T.S. Davila, M.B. de-Naclerio, D.M. Dodge, L.M. Donovan, H.S. Dowling, K. Finch, M. Fouhy, J.A. Gallalee, J. Gereda, K. Gereda Marganski, P. Hetherington, K.H. Kowats, E. Kressley, J.S. Landau, M. Lyons, K. Malensek, W. Marans, B.L. Mason, Z.H. Meredith, M. Moca, W.F. Njoroge, S. Peck, S.L. Peshori, H.C. Pizzanello, R. Plant, K.H. Pracitto, R.G. Pugliese, J. Radawich, B. Reddy, B.N. Rickler, C.T. Rowland, C. Schaefer, D.A. Schneider, C. Schwartz, V.M. Shiller, A.R. Square, M. St. Pierre, V. Stob, B. Taggart, E.O. Tongul, K. Voccola, M. Weinshel, G. Weiss

Lecturers K.F. Bailey, L.G. Barbieri, D.L. Bella, M.A. Ben-Avie, N.A. Brown, K. Carlson, E. Christakis, C.J. Cooper, J. Gillette, M. Gunsalus, D.P. Hauser, S. Heidmann, C.M. Horwitz, N.L. Kaufman, C.H. Olson, J.P. Platner, C. Reberkenny-Frisketti, P. Rhodeen, C. Savo, B.B. Sherman, C.B. Sicher, A. Zonderman

The Child Study Center is a multidisciplinary academic department of the School of Medicine for the study and care of children from birth through adolescence and their families. Child psychiatrists, psychologists, pediatricians, social workers, psychoanalysts, biomedical scientists, nurses, and other professionals collaboratively engage in research and treatment programs on various aspects of children’s growth and development, both normal and deviant. Research programs include child development, psychiatric disorders, social systems and schools, mental retardation, psychosomatic conditions, crisis and trauma, and treatment. Clinical services are provided in general and specialized outpatient clinics, in the Child Psychiatry Inpatient Service in the Children’s Hospital of Yale-New Haven, and in the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Consultation-Liaison Service. The center provides courses and other academic opportunities for undergraduates and graduate students in various disciplines concerned with children and families, as well as specialized training in child psychiatry, psychology, social work, and clinical research.

CHLD 222, Childhood Psychopathology Students are offered lectures, workshops, and videotapes of children with major or common psychiatric disorders usually first evident during infancy, childhood, and adolescence, including autism, mental retardation, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, school phobia, learning disabilities, Tourette’s Syndrome, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and adolescent disorders. Second year. R.A. King and faculty

CHLD 302, Child Study Center Clinical Research Elective This elective entails etiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment of adolescent psychopathology, including eating disorders, depression, suicide, psychosis, delinquency, and the impact of physical and mental disabilities on adolescent development. Reading is supplemented with live and taped clinical material. One student every four weeks. Director: A.S. Martin; R.A. King

CHLD 325/Psychiatry 325, Child Study Center Psychiatry Elective The aim of this elective is to provide the student with an intensive experience in infant, child, and adolescent psychiatry. The curriculum includes assessments of normal development and psychopathology in childhood, treatment methods, and research in major disorders of childhood. Students are active team members of the Children’s Psychiatric Inpatient Service (CPIS) and the consultation service to the pediatric wards of Yale-New Haven Hospital and can take advantage of the wide range of ongoing seminars, conferences, and clinical services in place at the Child Study Center. Teaching methods include seminars, conferences, field observations, ward rounds, and practicals selected by the student following consultation with the director of medical studies and the Child Study Center. One student every four weeks. Directors: A.S. Martin, R.M. Rohrbaugh

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Comparative Medicine

BML 330, 203.785.2525

http://medicine.yale.edu/compmed

Professors A.M. Bennett (Pharmacology), J. Bruning (Adjunct), M.A. Cowley (Adjunct), S. Diano (Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences), V.D. Dixit, L.M. Garcia-Segura (Adjunct), M. Hajos (Adjunct), J. Hirsch (Psychiatry), T.L. Horvath (Chair), R.O. Jacoby (Emeritus), J.D. Macy, M.W. Sleeman (Adjunct), I. Torres Aleman (Adjunct), M. Tschoep (Adjunct), C.J. Zeiss

Associate Professors J.L. Brandsma (Adjunct), C. Fernandez-Hernando, X. Gao, A.K. Sfakianaki (Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences), P.C. Smith, X. Yang

Assistant Professors C.J. Booth, M.O. Dietrich, J.A. Goodrich, M.S. Lawrence (Adjunct), I. Levy, M.S. Rodeheffer, J.A. Scholz, Y. Suarez, S.R. Wilson

Research Scientists S.R. Compton, J.M. McGrath, T.P. Nottoli, G. Yao

Associate Research Scientists J.L. Asher, R. Jakab, Z. Liu, H. Pushkarskaya, C.M. Ramirez-Hidalgo, H. Ruan, N.R. Vila, Y. Youm

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Dermatology

LCI 501, 203.785.4092

http://medicine.yale.edu/dermatology

Professors R.J. Antaya, S. Ariyan (Surgery), J.L. Bolognia, I.M. Braverman (Emeritus), L. Chen (Immunobiology), P. Cresswell (Immunobiology), R.L. Edelson (Chair), F.M. Foss (Medicine), M. Girardi, E.J. Glusac (Pathology), P.W. Heald (Emeritus), D.J. Leffell, J.M. McNiff, L.M. Milstone (Emeritus), J.S. Pober (Immunobiology), R.E. Tigelaar, L.D. Wilson (Therapeutic Radiology)

Associate Professors M.W. Bosenberg, K.A. Choate, S.E. Cowper, M.B. Faries (Surgical Oncology), V. Greco (Genetics), V. Horsley (Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology), C.J. Ko, R. Lazova, A. Subtil

Assistant Professors S.E. Book, C.G. Bunick, J. Choi, J.N. Choi, S.R. Christensen, O.R. Colegio, B.G. Craiglow, A. Galan, S. Imaeda, B.A. King, P. Myung, S. Ramachandran, M.M. Tomayko

Instructors Y.K. Khan, L. Kole, A. Zubek

Senior Research Scientists D.E. Brash (Therapeutic Radiology), I.M. Braverman, R. Halaban, L.M. Milstone, J.M. Pawelek

Associate Research Scientists K.R. Blenman, D.J. Hanlon

Clinical Professors I. Dvoretzky, M.T. Johnson, R.C. Savin, K.L. Watsky

Associate Clinical Professors M.R. Alexiades-Armenakas, S.H. Bender, A. Bronin, F.M. Castiglione, I.S. Cohen, D.M. Davidson, L.M. Donofrio, J.S. Dover, J.W. Edelglass, M.A. Gohara, R.S. Kahan, M. Kaminer, R.C. Langdon, E. Milstone, J. Moss, P.I. Schneiderman, P.E. Shapiro, L.A. Sibrack, A. Zalka

Assistant Clinical Professors J.N. Alter, A.V. Atton, S.H. Barrett, P.M. Bevilacqua, D.L. Bilinski, C.B. Carroll, T. Chartier, S. Chavel, C. Chess, D. Correale, L.A. Daman, K.M. Diette, D.L. Feinberg, B. Goldberg, M.J. Goldstein, D.R. Greene, W.S. Jacoby, J.D. Knispel, L.C. Kugelman, J.C. Lehrman, S.P. Lerner, A.B. Lewis, L.E. Luck, E.A. Markstein, E.R. Marsh, D.R. Miller, E. Mirrer, E. Naidorf, M.P. Noonan, W.A. Notaro, R.G. Oshman, B.J. Richter, J.G. Sansing, N.K. Sherline, N.R. Silverman, S.B. Sloan, J.R. Zirn, B. Zubkov

Clinical Instructors J. Cantatore-Francis, M.P. Coolidge, K.O. Duncan, T. Futoryan, J.M. Grant-Kels, P. Lowenstein, M.I. Oestreicher, D. Robinson, F. Santoro, E. Smith, B. Srivastava, D.S. Weissman

DERM 120, Dermatology Outpatient Elective The goal of this course is to ground students in the fundamentals of dermatologic physical examination, diagnosis, and treatment. Students are expected to acquire the skills needed by a primary care physician or surgeon to evaluate dermatological problems independently. Through outpatient experiences at the West Haven VA Medical Center, the Adult and Pediatric Yale Primary Care Clinics, and possibly the Yale Health Center, students are exposed to a variety of primary and referral dermatology services that treat inflammatory and neoplastic skin diseases. Students are also exposed to dermatologic surgery and dermatopathology. Students participate in departmental Grand Rounds and educational conferences, and read and review assigned materials in preparation for a series of case discussions led by faculty. A formal presentation on a topic of the student’s choice is required in the final week. One or two students every four weeks. Director: S. Imaeda

DERM 302, Dermatology Inpatient Consult Elective Working as integral members of the dermatology consult team, comprised of a dermatology resident and attending physician, students are exposed to dermatologic disease requiring inpatient admission, systemic disease with cutaneous manifestations, and skin complications among hospitalized patients. Students learn about initial evaluation, workup, and differential diagnosis building; the role of biopsy and histologic evaluation; and treatment plan design. Under resident supervision, students evaluate a new consult patient each day and follow this patient for the course of his or her stay. Students are expected to read intensively on relevant disease processes and formally present the patient to the attending on rounds. Additionally, students research disease and management-related questions that arise on the service and informally present a summary of findings to the attending and resident. Students participate in departmental Grand Rounds and educational conferences and in resident rounds of the inpatient service. Each student identifies a patient with a chronic dermatologic condition, conducts an in-depth interview to learn about how the disease and its treatment have affected the patient’s life, and how life considerations have affected disease management, and writes a 3–5-page summary. At the end of the rotation, the student presents a formal case presentation and literature review at Grand Rounds. One student every four weeks. Prerequisite: DERM 120. Directors: M.M. Tomayko, S. Imaeda

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Diagnostic Radiology

TE-2, 203.785.6938

http://medicine.yale.edu/diagnosticradiology

Professors J.J. Abrahams, H. Blumberg (Psychiatry), S. Bokhari, R.A. Bronen, M.I. Burrell, R.E. Carson, R.T. Constable, E.A. Cornelius (Emeritus), A.M. Curtis, J.S. Duncan, H.P. Forman, M.G. Glickman (Emeritus), T.R. Goodman, A.H. Haims, Y.H. Huang, D. Hyder, G.M. Israel, M.H. Johnson, L.D. Katz, E. Kier, J.P. Lawson (Emeritus), G.F. Mason, S.M. McCarthy, B.L. McClennan (Emeritus), D.B. Nunez, L.E. Philpotts, J. Pollak, A.T. Rosenfield (Emeritus), D.L. Rothman, L.M. Scoutt, C. Shaw (Emeritus), L.H. Staib, J.H. Sunshine (Adjunct), G. Sze, H.D. Tagare, I. Tocino, F.J. Wackers (Emeritus), J.C. Weinreb, R.I. White (Emeritus)

Associate Professors D. Cornfeld, K.P. Cosgrove (Psychiatry), R. de Graaf, R.K. Fulbright, R.J. Hooley, K.M. Johnson, C.R. Miller, H.R. Mojibian, E.D. Morris, X. Papademetris, E. Reiner, A.N. Rubinowitz, C.J. Silva, C.R. Taylor, S.W. Woods (Psychiatry)

Assistant Professors L. Andrejeva, M.H. Arici, R.R. Ayyagari, J. Brown, R. Butler, P.A. Cedeno, M. Chen, M.A. Choma, D. Dicks, I. Doddamane, M.A. Durand, L. Ehrlich, G. Galiana, J. Geisel, G. Gunabushanam, M. Hampson, L.J. Horvath, S. Huber, C. Juchem, R.H. Kent, J. Killam, J.D. Kirsch, I. Latich, P.H. Levesque, A.W. Lischuk, C. Liu, A. Mahajan, A. Malhotra, M. Mather, C.C. Matouk (Neurosurgery), R.D. Messina, F.J. Minja, J. Modi, J.A. Obando, J.K. Pahade, J.L. Perez Lozada, D.C. Peters, M. Raghu, M.V. Revzin, L.A. Saperstein, L.S. Sheiman, B.M. Shuch (Urology), D.D. Silin, M. Spektor, P. Varma, W.B. Zucconi

Instructors R. Chundru, P. Deb, K. Quencer, A. Velcani

Research Scientists D.E. Befroy, F. D’Errico, H. De Feyter

Associate Research Scientists F. Bois, C. Chan, D. Coman, J. Gallezot, B.S. Ganganna, P. Herman, L. Jiang, D.C. Labaree, K. Lim, S. Lin, D. Matuskey, N. Nabulsi, M. Naganawa, M. Negishi, V. Neklesa, E. Park, M. Qiu, J.R. Ropchan, X. Shen

Clinical Professors M.S. Shin, J.D. Slavin

Associate Clinical Professors G.R. Berg, L.W. Hammers, E.A. Hyson, T.R. McCauley, J.P. Seibyl

Assistant Clinical Professors W.E. Allen, R.D. Becker, S.B. Berger, M. Carino, J.K. Crowe, A.R. Daftary, P.A. Dinauer, M. Friedman, W.N. Friedman, J. Gagliardi, M. Ghita, R. Gonzalez, B.D. Griffith, A.I. Jonisch, A. Kalyanpur, J. Kim, R.A. Knobelman, C.T. Kubiak, H. Moukaddam, A.R. Niakosari, G.S. Novick, I. Onyiuke, J.R. Pannese, A. Pathak, C. Poon, Z. Protopapas, R. Sadar, B.D. Simonds, S.J. Sullivan, R.R. Tash, N.W. Tishkoff, M. Trivedi, J. Wruble

Clinical Instructors L.J. Hodges, D.G. Walled

DIAG 121, Diagnostic Radiology Clinical Elective Students are introduced to the basic principles of various types of radiologic interpretation and rotate daily through different sections in the department of diagnostic imaging, including gastrointestinal, genitourinary, chest, musculoskeletal, pediatrics, neuroradiology, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nuclear medicine, ultrasound, interventional, and emergency radiology. In addition to participating in the daily film interpretation with residents and staff, students receive an introduction to the role of each section in the diagnosis and management of disease. Interactive teaching presentations are available on the departmental Web site. Self-teaching materials are available in the radiology library. Students attend the department resident teaching conferences twice daily as well as specific student seminars. No on-call responsibilities. Maximum of six students every four weeks. Director: A.H. Haims

DIAG 134, Vascular and Interventional Radiology Elective This elective is an introduction to vascular and interventional radiology: the use of radiological imaging to guide procedures in various organ systems of the body and the evaluation and management of patients who are candidates for these. In the vascular system, this includes arterial and venous angiography, angioplasty, stenting, embolization for bleeding, tumors (such as uterine fibroids), vascular malformations, venous reflux management, inferior vena cava filter placement, hemodialysis access management, and placement of a variety of venous access devices. Nonvascular experience includes percutaneous approaches to biliary and urinary track pathology, drainage of abscesses and other fluid collections, and tumor ablation. Students participate in the interventional radiology clinic and admitting service. One student every two weeks. Director: I. Latich; J. Pollak, J.E. Aruny

DIAG 135, Pediatric Imaging Elective This elective serves as an introduction to the clinical management of infants, children, and adolescents through the use of integrated diagnostic imaging. Students participate through a review of imaging studies with residents and attending physicians; observation of fluoroscopic, ultrasound, and computed tomography (CT) procedures; and attendance at daily clinical conferences. Students are encouraged to present interesting cases or to participate in research projects during the elective. One or two students every two or four weeks. Director: L. Ehrlich

DIAG 137, Neuroradiology Elective This rotation is designed as an introduction to neuroradiology. The student becomes an integral part of the neuroradiology team, which consists of the resident, fellow, and attending physician. A number of teaching conferences and lectures are offered. The student is exposed to the various subsections of neuroradiology, including neuro CT, neuro MR, and neuro special procedures. One or two students every two or four weeks. Director: J.J. Abrahams

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Section of Education

Office of Education: ESH 305, 203.737.4190

Office of Student Research: ESH 308, 203.785.6633

http://medicine.yale.edu/education/curriculum

Integrated Course Curriculum (for students matriculating in 2015)

Master Courses

MD 1000, Introduction to the Profession The first master course in the new curriculum is Introduction to the Profession, or iPro. This is a two-week course in which students have the opportunity to participate in an immersive hospital experience and introduction to New Haven as well as an introduction to bioethics and professional responsibility. Themes emphasized are teamwork and communication, the experience of illness for the patient, and medical decision making and what goes into it. The premise of iPro is stories. Students reflect on the stories of the patients they meet and hear about, stories of the neighborhoods from which their patients come, the stories of the profession they are entering, and their own stories as they move forward in their professional journeys to become physicians. Open to M.D. and M.D./Ph.D. students only. N.R. Angoff, J.S. Hughes, M.R. Mercurio

MD 1025, Scientific Foundations This course integrates essential content from biochemistry, cell biology, epidemiology and public health, genetics, pathology, pharmacology, and physiology to provide first-year medical students with a foundation of knowledge in the basic sciences that underlies modern medicine. The course organizes content from the above disciplines into the following themes: Building a Body, Cell Communication, Cell Energy, Fluids and Gradients, Gene Expression, Life and Death of a Cell, and Population Health. Additional organ- and systems-related content for the above disciplines is distributed across the remaining pre-clerkship courses, as appropriate. Open to M.D. and M.D./Ph.D. students only. M.L. Schwartz, P.A. Takizawa

MD 1050, Genes and Development This course begins with content in the areas of basic human genetics, genetics technology, embryology, and developmental genetics. This is followed by principles of neoplasia and cancer biology, considering neoplasia as a genetically based aberration of normal development and cellular regulation. The course concludes with the topics of clinical oncology and hematology. This content is integrated and sequenced for optimal learning utilizing a variety of teaching methods including lectures, demonstrations, team-based learning, small-group workshops, clinical-pathologic correlations, patient interviews, and labs. Open to M.D. and M.D./Ph.D. students only. A.E. Bale, M.P. DiGiovanna

MD 1075, Attacks and Defenses This course includes content focused on the ability of the body to respond to injury, especially infectious and inflammatory injury. Themes include innate immunity, cellular immunology, infection and immunity, applied topics in immunopathology including autoimmune diseases such as are seen in rheumatology and immunomodulation, infectious disease and antimicrobial therapeutics, and dermatology and musculoskeletal disorders, integrating content areas by interweaving immunology and infection to inform each section of the other’s concepts. Human anatomy is introduced and aligned to the musculoskeletal content. There is also an introduction to radiology with specific topics relevant to the anatomy material. Multiple small workshops and laboratories focus on practical aspects of this material including microbiology laboratories; laboratories that focus on histologic aspects of injury and repair; and workshops on clinical approaches and management of common musculoskeletal, infectious, and dermatologic conditions. Open to M.D. and M.D./Ph.D. students only. Lectures may be audited with approval of the course directors. S.M. Campbell, R.J. Homer

MD 1100, Connection to the World An integrative overview of the structure and function of the human brain as it pertains to major neurological and psychiatric disorders. Neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and clinical correlations are interrelated to provide essential background in the neurosciences. Lectures in neurocytology and neuroanatomy survey neuronal organization in the human brain, with emphasis on functional regionalization in the brain and on the long fiber tracts related to clinical neuroscience. Laboratory sessions examine preparations of human brain to explore anatomical relationships. Lectures in neurophysiology cover neuronal function at the cellular level, with a strong emphasis on the mammalian nervous system. Clinical correlations focus on specific diseases and are presented by one or two faculty members representing both basic and clinical sciences. Throughout the course, lectures in neurology and sensory system clinical correlates are paired with presentations of structure-function relationships. Lectures on the biological basis of behavior are integrated with neurology and psychiatry. Topics in the biological basis of behavior and psychiatry include principles and neural mechanisms of learning and memory, neural systems involved in fear and anxiety, reward and drug addiction, stress, and neural systems attention. Patients diagnosed with specific diseases aree interviewed by course faculty during clinical correlations and workshops. Teaching formats include lectures, labs, team-based learning, workshops and clinical correlations. Open to M.D., M.D./Ph.D., and Neuroscience Ph.D. students only. The course cannot be audited. C.A. Greer, D.S. Navaratnam

MD 1125, Homeostasis Homeostasis is one of the fundamental properties of any living organism. The heart, lungs, and kidneys work in concert to provide oxygen to and remove toxins from our cells, and do so continuously from our first breath to our last. This course integrates cardiology, pulmonary, and renal content. The course starts with the renal system prior to the summer break, supported by digital anatomy sessions. Cadaver dissections matched to the organ and systems content of the course begin in the fall. Physiology and pathophysiology of organ systems are integrated in workshops and are taught by both clinical and physiology faculty. The sessions are heavily case-based and aimed at preparing the students for their clinical rotations. Open to M.D. and M.D./Ph.D. students only. D.S. Geller, S. Hull, N. Thande

MD 1150, Energy and Metabolism This course integrates physiology, cell biology, pathology, and pathophysiology for the following content areas: metabolism, gastrointestinal, hepatic and pancreatic, endocrinology, and the liver. It includes topics in nutrition, epidemiology and public health, and history of medicine. Open to M.D. and M.D./Ph.D. students only. E.H. Holt, C.R. Kapadia

MD 1175, Across the Lifespan The goal of this course is for medical students to acquire knowledge of normal and abnormal human development through all stages of life: conception, pregnancy and birth, child and adolescent growth and development, the reproductive years, and middle age and senescence. Material is taught in a variety of formats, including lectures, small-group workshops that discuss patient cases, and laboratories, and in a way that fosters the acquisition of clinical reasoning skills and prepares students to enter clerkships. Open to M.D. and M.D./Ph.D. students only. F. Galerneau, C. Kumar

Longitudinal Courses

MD 1200, Human Anatomy This longitudinal course runs concurrently with the master courses of the School of Medicine curriculum. It begins in the second term of first year and is completed at the end of the first term of the second year. Human Anatomy is integrated with the radiology, embryology, and pathophysiology activities of the master courses. Students engage in lectures, conferences, and cadaver dissections. Extensive use is made of computer software and Web-based radiologic, anatomic, and clinical reasoning activities. Four students are assigned to each cadaver; students work collaboratively; interpersonal and group process skills are stressed. Open to M.D. and M.D./Ph.D. students only. L.J. Rizzolo and staff

MD 1225, Professional and Ethical Responsibility This longitudinal course runs the duration of the eighteen-month pre-clerkship period and features lectures, readings, and small-group case discussions. The course examines the various contexts (social, legal, financial, and organizational) in which the practice of medicine takes place, with a particular focus on principles and approaches to medical ethics. Specific ethical problems in the practice of medicine are addressed, both historical and current, and these issues are considered in the setting of individual patient encounters as well as on the societal level. In addition, practical and ethical aspects of the various components of the U.S. health care system are reviewed. Open to M.D. and M.D./Ph.D. students only. J.S. Hughes, M.R. Mercurio

MD 1250, Scientific Inquiry: Biostatistics and Research Methods and Responsible Conduct of Research (includes MD 501b) This course has two overarching goals. The first is to instill in students an understanding of the value of the Yale student research program and thesis and to provide a primer for success in the thesis. Emphasis is placed on how to choose an excellent thesis project and mentor in laboratory or clinical research, as well as in the areas of epidemiology and public health, international medicine, or medicine and the humanities. Students are instructed on the importance of the research environment, the selection of the best possible up-to-date methods, the importance of issues related to human investigation, and the requirements for HIC approval of protocols for medical student research. The second area of emphasis is to provide students with the basics in designing laboratory and clinical studies, including the use of power calculations, proper control groups, practical biostatistical measurements and their applications for research, and methods for efficient searching of the literature and online databases. Open to M.D. and M.D./Ph.D. students only. J.N. Forrest, faculty, and staff

MD 501b, Responsible Conduct of Research (taught as part of MD 1250) The Office of Student Research and the M.D./Ph.D. Program have developed a compact ethics course that satisfies the NIH requirements for students supported on training grants, i.e., first- and fifth-year medical students, and M.D./Ph.D. students. Attendance is mandatory by those students. Topics covered include peer review; responsible authorship and publications; policies regarding human subjects; live vertebrate animal subjects in research and safe laboratory practice; collaborative research including collaborations with industry; data acquisition and laboratory tools, management, sharing, and ownership; conflict of interest; mentor-mentee responsibilities and relationships; research misconduct and policies for handling misconduct; the scientist as a responsible member of society, contemporary ethical issues in biomedical research, and the environmental and social impacts of scientific research. Material is taught through lectures with group discussion and case studies. (Six 1.5-hour sessions.) J.N. Forrest S. Alfano, M.J. Caplan, L. Cohen, F. Gorelick, B. Kazmierczak, R.J. Levine, D. Lewin, J.D. Macy, M. Picciotto, D.G. Schatz, S.S. Spangler, M. Waxman

MD 1300, Clinical Skills This course spans the first eighteen months of school for all medical students. Students begin to develop and refine their clinical skills, the essential elements of “doctoring” that physicians use during patient encounters. In Clinical Skills (CS), students learn to communicate with patients, families, and other members of the care team; examine patients; develop clinical reasoning skills; and understand the important role of a student-doctor in a patient’s care. Multiple teaching modalities are utilized in CS, but the bulk of the experiences are designed to be hands-on, offering students the opportunity to develop clinical skills with direct faculty observation and feedback, frequently with the use of standardized patients. Throughout CS, emphasis is placed on taking a patient-centered approach to care. Students pass the course by attending all class sessions (attendance is mandatory) and performing a competent history and physical exam in a standardized assessment session at UConn. Course content is practiced and supplemented in the Clinical Skills Tutor Program or Longitudinal Clinical Experience (LCE) pilot. Director: J. Talwalkar

MD 1325, Clinical Skills Tutor Program The C.S. Tutor Program provides opportunities for students to practice and reinforce the skills learned in Clinical Skills class sessions. Students work with their tutor groups longitudinally during weekly sessions throughout the first eighteen months of school. Tutor groups consist of four students led by experienced physicians who help students learn the basics of history taking, physical examination, and clinical reasoning, while modeling professionalism. Students practice these skills on each other and with patients in various clinical settings. The tutor group sessions are designed specifically to provide supervised, individualized instruction and reinforcement of the concepts learned in class. Open to M.D. and M.D./Ph.D. students only. Attendance at the weekly tutor sessions is mandatory. Director: B. Wu

MD 1350, Clinical Skills Longitudinal Clinical Experience (Pilot) The C.S. Longitudinal Clinical Experience (LCE) is a pilot program at Yale School of Medicine in which groups of three to four students from YSM, Yale School of Nursing, and the Yale Physician Associate Program see patients at a specific site alongside faculty mentors. Groups meet approximately once a week throughout the first eighteen months of school. LCE sessions provide students with opportunities to practice clinical skills, with specific emphasis on interprofessional teamwork, quality, safety, and other issues related to the health care system. The Class of 2019 will be invited to participate in the pilot program. Students will be chosen by lottery from those interested. These students will participate in the traditional C.S. course but will practice and reinforce their in-class learning with patients in a clinical setting in lieu of the traditional C.S. Tutor Program. Open to M.D., M.D./Ph.D., PA, and YSN students. Attendance at LCE sessions is mandatory. Director: E.R. Colson

Second-Year Courses (for students who matriculated in 2014)

MD 105, Pre-Clinical Clerkship This course, extending throughout the first two years, is intended to teach medical students skills in communication, medical history taking, and physical examination, as well as clinical reasoning. The format of the course involves large-group sessions for the purpose of demonstrating or modeling interview techniques and many small-group sessions in which students get a chance to observe and practice specific skills. Standardized patients are used throughout the course for teaching interviewing skills as well as specialized physical examination maneuvers. At the beginning of their second year, students are evaluated on their ability to perform a complete history and physical examination at the Clinical Skills Assessment Program at UConn. The Clinical Tutor Program and Longitudinal Clinical Experience are integral to the Pre-Clinical Clerkship. In these programs, groups of students work longitudinally with faculty mentors weekly over a two-year period to practice their newly learned skills on patients in various clinical settings. Students pass the Pre-Clinical Clerkship by attending all the skill-building sessions; demonstrating the ability to perform a complete history and physical exam from memory (at UConn); and having acquired the skills needed on the wards according to their tutor(s) or LCE mentors. Open only to second-year medical students in 2015–2016. Director: J. Talwalkar

MD 106, Mechanisms of Disease Course: Organs/Systems The purpose of this course is to bridge the preclinical and clinical years and to teach students to use scientific data in a clinical context. It introduces the pathologic variation of the normal physiologic mechanisms that the students have already learned. This required course is offered in a continuum from September through March for second-year medical students. It consists of thirteen integrated discrete organ-system-based modules that present disease processes from various disciplinary perspectives. The components include pathology, laboratory medicine, diagnostic radiology, preventive medicine, geriatrics, pharmacology, clinical medicine, pediatrics, surgery, and potentially others as indicated by the subject matter.

For each module, representatives from each discipline meet and create a course that presents a comprehensive overview of the organ/system, progressing and building information in a way that allows students to form a basis on which to add knowledge throughout their careers.

Material is taught in a variety of formats including lectures, small group workshops that discuss patient cases, and laboratories. The modules are Hematology; Cardiovascular System; Clinical Neuroscience; Clinical Psychiatry; Endocrine Systems; Reproductive Medicine; Digestive Diseases; Musculo-Skeletal System; Renal/Urology Systems; Respiratory; Ophthalmology; Oncology; and Dermatology. Each module has a module director who is the faculty coordinator. These modules provide excellent preparation for clinical work on the wards as well as preparation for the second-year USMLE Board Exam, the questions of which use a clinical paradigm. Open only to second-year medical students in 2015–2016. Director: M.P. DiGiovanna

Integrated Clerkships

MD 2000 (IM)/MD 2025 (NEUR), Medical Approach to the Patient This twelve-week integrated clerkship includes internal medicine (eight weeks) and neurology (four weeks) clinical components. Throughout the clerkship, students participate in integrated experiences that address the themes related to hospital-based care such as management of acute disease, diagnostic skills, transitions of care, quality improvement, and organ systems. Directors: D.B. DiCapua, D.W. Dunne

MD 2050 (IM)/MD 2075 (Psych), Primary Care and Psychiatry Clerkship This twelve-week integrated clerkship includes ambulatory internal medicine and psychiatry clinical components, as well as outpatient pediatrics and OB/Gyn. Students participate in one four-week full-time placement at a primary care practice in Connecticut and one four-week part-time placement, which co-occurs with a part-time psychiatry consult placement. The psychiatry component of the clerkship includes four weeks of full-time inpatient psychiatry, four weeks part-time consultation psychiatry, and eight half-days in an ambulatory psychiatry setting. This integrated clerkship emphasizes themes such as health promotion and disease prevention, social determinants of health, behavioral change, systems-based care, and management of chronic disease. Directors: W.N. Kernan, K.M. Wilkins

MD 2100 (SURG)/MD 2125 (EMER), Surgical Approach to the Patient This twelve- week integrated clerkship includes surgery (six weeks, general; three weeks, specialties) and emergency medicine (three weeks) clinical components. Throughout the clerkship students participate in integrated experiences that address themes of the OR experience such as perioperative care, emergency/trauma management, procedures, medical error and patient safety, and anesthesiology. Students also participate in a twelve-week mentoring program during the clerkship. Directors: L. Hile, A.W. Kim

MD 2150 (OBGY)/MD 2175 (PEDS), Women and Children’s Health This twelve-week integrated clerkship includes clinical components in obstetrics and gynecology and pediatrics. Students participate in four weeks of OB/Gyn inpatient, four weeks of pediatric inpatient, and four weeks of combined OB/Gyn and pediatric outpatient clinical experiences. Throughout the clerkship students participate in integrated experiences that cover themes such as health and development, preventive care, sexual health, families and communities, health promotion and disease prevention, and perinatal care. All students attend an evening session with the gynecologic teaching associates. Directors: E.R. Colson, D.C. Hersh, S.R. Pathy

Fourth-Year Courses

MD 158, Primary Care Clerkship The Fourth-Year Primary Care Clerkship provides students with an opportunity to acquire knowledge and develop clinical and interpersonal skills applicable to outpatient primary care practice. Students are assigned to a community-based office or clinic where they care for patients under supervision by a family practitioner, internist, or pediatrician on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays for one month. On Tuesdays and Thursdays students attend a case-based Workshop Program based on common disorders and core skills relevant to primary care practice. Open only to students who matriculated in 2012 or earlier. Director: P. Ellis; with a faculty made up of physician educators who share a commitment to practice-based teaching

MD 158-1, Primary Care Wednesday Evening Clinic This one-year weekly outpatient clerkship in the Primary Care Center provides experience in the longitudinal care of adults. Students are directly responsible for care of medical problems and preventive care as well as coordination of specialty care for their own patient panel. There are weekly preclinic conferences, which include Journal Club and primary care case-centered topics presented by students or specialty attendings. The clinic is held every Wednesday evening, 5–9 p.m., except the day before Thanksgiving and between Christmas and New Year’s. It is open to a limited number of fourth-year students and fulfills the fourth-year primary care clerkship requirement provided that students also complete the Primary Care Clerkship Workshop Program. (Note: Primary Care Clerkship credit given for students who matriculated in 2012 or earlier.) Students must have completed Hospital Medicine I and II of the Core Medicine Clerkship and Ambulatory Medicine as well as two other third-year clerkships, preferably Psychiatry and Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences. Director: P. Oray-Schrom; staffed by rotating attending physicians

MD 9999, Integrated Clinical Medicine This capstone course is required of fourth-year students in the spring term immediately prior to the internship match. Conceived more than ten years ago as a capstone to four years of medical school training, the ICM course provides a review of some of the knowledge and skills needed for internship and beyond, a forum for a comprehensive and critical evaluation of clinical cases, a chance to review some of the historical and economic factors that inform the practice of medicine, and an opportunity to reflect on the social, ethical, psychological, and even spiritual challenges of a life in medicine. Director: D.I. Rosenthal

Elective Courses

MD 101, Intensive Pedagogical Experience in Laboratory Research Techniques Intensive one-week summer course in biomedical research protocols and techniques is open to first-year medical students at Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine. Four biomedical research topics are the focus of each course: (1) physiological studies of chloride transport in an intact epithelial organ from Squalus acanthias; (2) ion channel gene expression in a heterologous expression system (Xenopus oocytes); (3) studies in isolated tubule preparations, including immunocytochemistry of phosphorylated vs. non-phosphorylated co-transporters, tissue processing, confocal microscopy, Western blots, and antibody design; (4) molecular biology of membrane proteins and transporters in shark salt gland, including methods in RNA, cDNA, PCR, cloning, and sequencing. J.N. Forrest, B. Forbush, P. Aaronson, R. Frizzell, and staff

MD 102, Organization and Leadership This course is an introduction to topics in the field of organizational behavior. It is designed to offer participants an opportunity to explore a variety of concepts that relate to the effective and humane management of organizations. Though medicine was once a profession made up primarily of individual practitioners, it is increasingly true that medical professionals, both researchers and clinicians, are now involved in collective endeavors that require coordinated efforts to produce meaningful results. This is the domain of organizational behavior and the subject matter of this course. D.N. Berg

MD 103, Applied Principles of Clinical Research (First-Year Seminars)—Office of Student Research The purpose of this intensive two-week course is to provide an overview of the objectives, research strategies, and methods of conducting patient-oriented research. Topics include research designs, how to ask a research question, data collection, how to write a protocol, bias in studies, qualitative methods, etc. Emphasis is placed on applying concepts to students’ actual research projects. Sessions are workshops that combine didactics and use students’ projects to illuminate concepts. Students must have declared interest in conducting patient-oriented research by May of the first year. Consent of instructor required. Two weeks in summer to be announced. Staff

MD 104, Applied Principles of Clinical Research (Fifth-Year Seminars)—Office of Student Research The purpose of this intensive two-week course is to provide an overview of the objectives, research strategies, and methods of conducting patient-oriented designs, how to ask a research question, data collection, how to write a protocol, bias in studies, qualitative methods, etc. Emphasis is placed on applying concepts to students’ actual research projects. Sessions are workshops that combine didactics and use students’ projects to illuminate concepts. Students must be funded for one year of research. Consent of instructor required. Two weeks in summer to be announced. Staff

MD 110, The Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine (YJBM) The course provides an educational opportunity for students in medicine, public health, nursing, and the biological sciences to gain experience in all aspects of academic publishing. The YJBM publishes online four times a year through PubMed Central and receives manuscripts on a wide variety of topics in basic and clinical sciences from authors around the world. Alongside participating faculty members, students review and select articles for publication and have the opportunity to review books and write articles showcasing their research or sharing clinical experiences from Yale and abroad. Student editors are chosen each year from the School of Medicine and the Combined Program in the Biological and Biomedical Sciences. The editorial staff meets monthly. Faculty adviser: J.R. Bender

MD 503, Seminars in Pediatrics: Bedside to Bench The purpose of these seminars is to begin to understand how interesting questions derived from patients can help us learn more about biologic and pathologic processes. We specifically engage the group in discussions related to diseases or medical problems that affect infants and children. Students select a topic and faculty preceptor, see a patient with that preceptor, lead a seminar, present the patient briefly to the group, and, most importantly, develop some questions that arise in the course of learning about the patients. C.W. Bogue, M. Brueckner, M.K. Khokha, J.D. Jamieson

MD 505, Family Medicine Elective, Oneonta, New York This is a unique opportunity to experience the full spectrum of family practice in a small-town environment. In this elective students (1) learn how to approach the practice of family medicine in a small town with limited access to specialists and how to use available resources to provide high-quality care, (2) learn about care coordination with larger health care systems in this practice setting, (3) learn about the practice of medicine in a small community and how physicians are integrated into that community, and (4) develop a family systems-based approach to providing care. The preceptor is a Yale graduate who provides primary care for a diverse population in both the hospital and clinic setting. One student every two or four weeks. Director: P. Ellis

MD 510, Teaching and Learning Center Medical Education Elective The word “doctor” is derived from the Latin docere, which means “to teach.” Indeed, the role of physicians as care providers is deeply intertwined with their role as teachers—of patients, of students, and of peers. The goal of this rotation is to introduce medical students to their role as teachers and better prepare them for this role before they begin residency. It makes use of didactic lectures, observations, group exercises, and teaching activities to facilitate the development of knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to help students develop their experience and identity as teachers as they transition from medical school into residency. The objectives are (1) to develop specific skills that will allow students to teach more effectively in the various clinical and classroom scenarios (work rounds, grand rounds, physical diagnosis rounds, operating room, morning report, noon conference) that they will experience during residency; (2) to observe and learn from role models in the field of medical education and describe the characteristics of effective teachers; (3) to describe the current state of medical education, with a focus on educational theory and evidence derived from the medical education literation; (4) to explore how students can integrate their roles as clinician and educator regardless of career goals; and (5) to develop the attitudes that place a strong emphasis on the value of medical education. Assessment is built into the elective through self-reflection and verbal and written feedback from peers and faculty. These include homework assignments or feedback in group exercises and teaching activities. Students are also asked to self-assess their previous knowledge of and exposure to each of the topics described in the course. All students complete a set of objective structured teaching encounters (OSTEs) at the end of the course, directly observed by faculty facilitators. Maximum of twelve students for two weeks. Directors: J. Hafler, G. Connors

MD 600, Family Medicine Elective, Middlesex Hospital This elective exposes students to the wide variety of clinical situations encountered in a national model, community-based family medicine residency program. In offices in Middletown, Portland, and East Hampton, students see and examine patients, present their findings and differential diagnosis, develop a plan of investigation and management with their supervisor, and explain the plan to their patients. Students manage and document care using electronic health records. In Middlesex Hospital, students are members of the team on the family medicine inpatient service, which provides medical, pediatric, newborn, maternity, and consultative care. Formal teaching activities include both didactic and interactive sessions, daily bedside teaching rounds, several weekly conference series, and weekly three-hour hands-on seminars. All three offices are equipped with facilities for minor surgery, casting, colposcopy, spirometry, audiometry, complete vision screening, electrocardiograms, various cultures, and rapid, enzyme-based diagnostic tests. Patients are from all walks of life and all ages and seek medical care for a wide variety of acute and chronic conditions. The emphasis is on continuity in ambulatory, nursing home, and hospital care. One student every four weeks. Director: M. Cardona

MD 601, Family Medicine Subinternship, Middlesex Hospital This advanced inpatient experience provides an opportunity for motivated students to challenge themselves with an in-depth experience in inpatient family medicine. The goal is to help prepare future family physicians to provide high-quality inpatient management of common problems, including procedures and medical emergencies. Students function at the intern level as a member of the teaching service team, which consists of two upper-year residents and two other interns. Responsibilities include performing admission histories and physicals, making daily work rounds and progress notes, entering orders electronically, dictating discharge summaries, and responding to hospital emergencies. Students are on call two weekend days during the rotation. Students also participate in multiple daily teaching opportunities—including morning report, hospitalist teaching rounds, and subspecialty conferences—and attend the weekly half-day Family Medicine Seminar. Open to fourth-year students only. Prerequisites: completion of Inpatient Medicine and Inpatient Pediatrics. One student every four weeks. Director: M. Cardona.

MD 610, Palliative/Hospice Medicine Elective, Branford, Connecticut This fifty-two-bed inpatient program at the nation’s first hospice provides intensive palliative care for patients with terminal illness. The medical, psychological, and spiritual needs of these patients and their families are met through the coordinated efforts of an interdisciplinary team (IDT) of physicians, nurses, social workers, pharmacists, clergy, art therapists, and volunteers. Students work one-one-one with an attending physician caring for patients approaching the end of life and their families. They participate fully in admissions, morning rounds, family conferences, and IDT conferences. This elective offers students an opportunity to acquire advanced knowledge and skills in the management of symptoms (pain, anxiety, insomnia, etc.), which will benefit them in their future care of all patients, both those approaching the end of life as well as those who are acutely or chronically ill. It is the only elective in which symptom management receives a major focus. The goal of this elective is to learn to provide optimal symptom management and, as members of the IDT, to learn to care for patients approaching the end of life and to give support to their families. A four-week rotation, which allows for optional time spent with allied services and/or home care, is recommended, although a two-week rotation is available. One or two students every two or four weeks. Codirectors: J. Andrews, W.S. Long

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Emergency Medicine

464 Congress Avenue, Suite 260, 203.785.4404

http://medicine.yale.edu/emergencymed

Associate Professors M.S. Bogucki, K. Cheung, D. Della-Giustina, J.D. Dziura, A.L. Hsiao (Pediatrics), C. Moore, L.A. Post, M. Shapiro

Assistant Professors B.J. Biroscak, J.W. Bonz, S.A. Chekijian, K.L. Dodge, L.V. Evans, A.R. French, K. Goldflam, D. Hile, K.J. Jubanyik, R. Liu, E.G. Marcolini, E. Melnick, E.P. Monico, H.C. Moscovitz, H.O. Mowafi, V. Parwani, B. Safdar, J.E. Sather, A.F. Tarabar, R.A. Taylor, A. Tomassoni, C.R. Wira

Instructors P. Agrawal, A. Aydin, D.R. Camenga, R. Carter, M.K. Hall, R. Harrison, K. Hawk, A. Hayward, L. Hile, K.A. Lord, I. Medoro, A.K. Merritt, T. Moadel, C.M. Ngaruiya, J. Pare, J. Shih, S. Thomas, A. Tsyrulnik, M. VanderMey, A.K. Venkatesh

Research Scientist M.V. Pantalon

Associate Research Scientists F. Abujarad, C.H. Lee

Associate Clinical Professors J. Maisel, M.J. Werdmann

Assistant Clinical Professors C.L. Barsky, C. Rambus, I. Schwartz, T.D. Shah

Lecturers I.M. Abrahamson, J. Aldrich, R.D. Austin, K. Baker, T. Balga, G.P. Bernardi, C. Bogan, K.J. Burns, R.E. Chen, J. Ciarleglio, T.E. Cohen, S. Colella, V. Colon, G.C. Demers, C. Dill, J. DiLungo, M. Ebling, G.M. Faherty, M. Gargano, A.L. Glick, K. Haskins, R.P. Hausfeld, G. Hepburn, A. Hirschman, E.W. Kelleher, T. Kimberly, R. Kissane, N. Klein, J. Kneen, D. Leonard, J. Lockel, D.S. MacMillan, K.A. Martens, A. Meiman, T.A. Morris, Z. Mundus, D. O’Reilly, H. Puciata, L. Russ, R. Sheehan, V. Sinha, S. Sutherland, K.S. Sylvester, V. Takacs, A. Turczak, A. Umstead, S. Verity, J. Walz, H.B. White, M.L. Young

MD 2125 (EMER)/MD 2100 (SURG), Surgical Approach to the Patient This twelve-week integrated clerkship includes surgery (six weeks, general; three weeks, specialties) and emergency medicine (three weeks) clinical components. Throughout the clerkship students participate in integrated experiences that address themes of the OR experience such as perioperative care, emergency/trauma management, procedures, medical error and patient safety, and anesthesiology. Students also participate in a twelve-week mentoring program during the clerkship. Directors: L. Hile, A.W. Kim

EMER 105, Emergency Medicine Subinternship Students participating in this four-week subinternship are immersed in the acute care setting, working under direct faculty supervision in the Yale-New Haven Hospital emergency department. Students work approximately thirty-six clinical hours per week and participate in both the weekly didactic sessions as well as specialized student case conferences and procedure workshops. Interested students can also do some ultrasound scanning shifts and/or attend ultrasound tape review sessions. Students also have the option to do the subinternship in a longitudinal fashion, completing at least sixteen shifts over a six-month period. This is an ideal opportunity for students in the lab or completing a combined degree program at Yale to maintain clinical skills while away from the wards. Students who are not planning on a career in emergency medicine may also consider applying to do a two-week advanced elective in emergency medicine to learn advanced acute patient management, clinical skills, and procedures. Prerequisites: Internal Medicine and General Surgery Clerkships. Maximum of eight students every four weeks. Director: L. Hile

EMER 107, Integrative Clinical Medicine ICM is a month-long course offered for graduating students. The emphasis is on preparing the student for internship, and the course offers a practical approach to common complaints. Chief complaints such as chest pain and shortness of breath as well as dysrhythmias are discussed. Presentations, differentials, and efficient, evidence-based work-ups and emergent/urgent treatment are outlined. K.J. Jubanyik

EMER 109, Physician Associate Emergency Medicine Rotation A four-week introduction to emergency medicine, with emphasis on teaching the importance of creating an appropriate differential diagnosis in patients who present to the ED with routine as well as potentially life-threatening chief complaints. The students work shifts in the main ED as well as in Urgent Care, where they learn the skills necessary to assess and treat patients with undifferentiated complaints and are given the opportunity to perform a number of procedures. Emphasis is on teaching the students to take a history, perform a physical examination, formulate differentials, and implement treatment in the acute, fast-paced setting of the emergency department. Students attend morning report as well as the Emergency Medicine resident didactics for five hours each week. J.E. Sather

EMER 112, Emergency Medicine Point-of-Care Ultrasound Elective A two- or four-week experience that introduces the student to the use of diagnostic and procedural ultrasound at the bedside. Educational ultrasounds are performed by the student on emergency department patients using ultrasound equipment in the ED. Attention is paid to image acquisition, machine optimization, and image interpretation. Diagnostic pelvic, vascular, cardiac, pulmonary, biliary, trauma, and soft-tissue sonography are introduced. In addition, there are opportunities for the student to participate in supervised ultrasound-guided procedures (central and peripheral vascular access, abscess drainage, paracentesis). The bulk of time is spent performing ultrasounds in the emergency department, with one half-day a week spent reviewing recorded examinations. Educational materials are provided. While the focus of this rotation is the sonographic evaluation of the emergency patient, students considering almost any specialty may benefit as clinician-performed ultrasound continues to expand. This elective is dedicated solely to the experience and practice of point-of-care ultrasound in the ED. Students are assigned daily scanning shifts that do not carry any clinical responsibility but offer exposure to the clinical environment. It is not the same as the combined Emergency Medicine/Ultrasound Subinternship, in which the student is primarily assigned clinical shifts to demonstrate knowledge, proficiency, and workflow, and also receives exposure to ultrasound through a few scan shifts and image review sessions. May be taken as a four-week half-time elective. Maximum of four students every two or four weeks. R. Liu

EMER 115, Medical Simulation Course A twelve-week course. Each week, students have the opportunity to manage acute emergency medicine and surgical scenarios using a high-fidelity mannequin simulator, the Laerdal SimMan 3-G. Sample scenarios include acute myocardial infarction, septic shock, and ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. A group of four students cares for the patient from the arrival in the emergency department to final patient disposition. Students take a history and physical, administer medications, perform procedural interventions to stabilize the patient, consult specialists, discuss plans with the patient, and inform family members of the patient’s status. Procedures include endotracheal intubation, chest tube thoracostomies, and nasogastric tube and urinary catheter insertion. Medical students manage twenty-four scenarios over the twelve-week course, with debriefing sessions led by faculty experts and debriefers from the Departments of Emergency Medicine and Surgery. Team communication, professionalism, and leadership skills are emphasized. The simulation course exposes students to acute emergencies and management strategies not available to them at their level of training on the clinical wards. L.V. Evans

EMER 155/PEDS 155, Pediatric Emergency Medicine Elective Fourth-year students have the opportunity to evaluate and manage a broad range of acute medical and surgical complaints under direct attending supervision, including thirty-six clinical hours per week in the pediatric emergency department. Participation in teaching conferences and mock codes is required. One student every four weeks. Prerequisites: pediatric rotation, EPIC inpatient training, and EPIC ED e-learning. Director: P.L. Aronson

EMER 305, Combined Emergency Medicine/Ultrasound Subinternship Students are immersed in the acute care setting, working under direct faculty supervision in the Yale-New Haven Hospital emergency department. Students work a combination of clinical shifts (eight hours long) and scan shifts (four hours long) and participate in the weekly resident conference, ultrasound tape review, and specialized student case conferences and procedure workshops. Ultrasounds are performed by students on emergency department patients using ultrasound equipment in the ED. Attention is paid to image acquisition, machine optimization, and image interpretation. Diagnostic pelvic, vascular, cardiac, pulmonary, biliary, trauma, and soft-tissue sonography are introduced. In addition, there are opportunities for the student to participate in supervised ultrasound-guided procedures (central and peripheral vascular access, abscess drainage, paracentesis). One or two students every four weeks. Director: L. Hile

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Genetics

SHM I308, 203.785.2649

http://medicine.yale.edu/genetics

Professors A.E. Bale, S.J. Baserga (Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry), W.R. Breg (Emeritus), L. Cooley, D.C. DiMaio, B.G. Forget (Medicine), P.G. Gallagher (Pediatrics), J.E. Gelernter (Psychiatry), A.J. Giraldez, P.M. Glazer (Therapeutic Radiology), J.R. Gruen (Pediatrics), M. Gunel (Neurosurgery), K.K. Hirschi (Medicine), A.L. Horwich, K.K. Kidd, R.P. Lifton (Chair), H. Lin (Cell Biology), M.J. Mahoney, C.M. Radding (Emeritus), M.R. Seashore, N. Sestan (Neurobiology), G.S. Shadel (Pathology), C.W. Slayman, S. Somlo (Medicine), J.B. Sweasy (Therapeutic Radiology), P.J. Tattersall (Laboratory Medicine), P. Tsipouras (Adjunct), S.M. Weissman, T. Xu, H. Zhao (Public Health)

Associate Professors M. Brueckner (Pediatrics), K.A. Choate (Dermatology), V. Greco, N.B. Ivanova, M.K. Khokha (Pediatrics), P. Li, J. Lu, A. Mani (Medicine), M.N. Nitabach (Cellular and Molecular Physiology), J. Noonan, V. Reinke, Z. Sun, S.D. Weatherbee

Assistant Professors K. Bilguvar, C. Cotsapas (Neurology), M. Hammarlund, J. Lim, I. Park, C. Scharfe, M. Spencer-Manzon, A. Xiao, H.Z. Zhang

Senior Research Scientist S.M. Mane

Research Scientists W.A. Fenton, A.M. Hudson, J. Knight, J.M. McGrath (Comparative Medicine), A.J. Pakstis, X. Pan

Associate Research Scientists A. Bazzini, L.M. Boyden, A. Canaan, C.Y. Chabu, J. Cheng, D. Cifuentes Buira, J.L. Cotney, S. Ding, W. Ji, T. Kazakov, K. Kim, H. Kokubu, D. Li, J. Lian, Y. Liu, J.F. Lopez-Giraldez, A. Leung, J. Lu, Y. Lu, D. Ma, S. Mehta, M.A. Moreno-Mateos, M. Nagy, D.N. Nguyen, W. Niu, L.M. Petti, F. Qian, A.M. Szekely, C. Takacs, T. Wang, Z. Wang, T. Wu, F. Xu, J. Yang, J. Zhang

GENE 625a/MB&B 625au/MCDB 625au, Basic Concepts of Genetic Analysis The universal principles of genetic analysis in eukaryotes are discussed in lectures. Students also read a small selection of primary papers illustrating the very best of genetic analysis and dissect them in detail in the discussion sections. While other Yale graduate molecular genetics courses emphasize molecular biology, this course focuses on the concepts and logic underlying modern genetic analysis. T. Xu and staff

GENE 645b/BIS 645b/CB&B 647b, Statistical Methods in Human Genetics Probability modeling and statistical methodology for the analysis of human genetics data are presented. Topics include population genetics, single locus and polygenic inheritance, linkage analysis, quantitative trait analysis, association analysis, haplotype analysis, population structure, whole genome genotyping platforms, copy number variation, pathway analysis, and genetic risk prediction models. Prerequisites: genetics; BIS 505a and b; STAT 541 or equivalent; or permission of the instructor. H. Zhao, K.K. Kidd

GENE 655a/CBIO 655a, Stem Cells: Biology and Application This course is designed for first-year or second-year students to learn the fundamentals of stem cell biology and to gain familiarity with current research in the field. The course is presented in a lecture and discussion format based on primary literature. Topics include stem cell concepts, methodologies for stem cell research, embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells, cloning and stem cell reprogramming, and clinical applications of stem cell research. Prerequisites: undergraduate-level cell biology, molecular biology, and genetics. I.-H. Park, H. Lin, and faculty

GENE 675a and b, Graduate Student Seminar: Critical Analysis and Presentation of Scientific Literature Students gain experience in preparing and delivering seminars and in discussing presentations by other students. A variety of topics in molecular, cellular, developmental, and population genetics are covered. Required of all second-year students in Genetics. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. V. Greco and staff

[GENE 703b, The Mouse in Biomedical Research This course describes aspects of comparative genomics, construction of genetically altered mice, mouse phenotyping, and study design relevant to the use of mice in the study of human disease. Prerequisites: undergraduate-level knowledge of genetics and mammalian anatomy and physiology. Not offered in 2015–2016]

GENE 734a/MB&B 734a/MBIO 734a, Molecular Biology of Animal Viruses Lecture course with emphasis on mechanisms of viral replication, oncogenic transformation, and virus-host cell interactions. B.D. Lindenbach

GENE 743b/MB&B 743bu/MCDB 743b, Advanced Eukaryotic Molecular Biology Selected topics in transcriptional control, regulation of chromatin structure, mRNA processing, mRNA stability, RNA interference, translation, protein degradation, DNA replication, DNA repair, site-specific DNA recombination, somatic hypermutation. Prerequisite: biochemistry or permission of the instructor. M.W. Hochstrasser, K. Neugebauer, M. Simon, P. Sung

GENE 749a/MB&B 749au, Medical Impact of Basic Science Consideration of examples of recent discoveries in basic science that have elucidated the molecular origins of disease or that have suggested new therapies for disease. Emphasis is placed on the fundamental principles on which these advances rely. Reading is from the primary scientific and medical literature, with emphasis on developing the ability to read this literature critically. Aimed primarily at undergraduates. Prerequisite: biochemistry or permission of the instructor. J.A. Steitz, I.G. Miller, A.D. Miranker, K. Neugebauer, D.G. Schatz, T.A. Steitz, and staff

GENE 760b, Genomic Methods for Genetic Analysis Introduction to the analysis and interpretation of genomic datasets. The focus is on next-generation sequencing (NGS) applications including RNA-seq, ChIP-seq, and exome and whole genome sequencing. By the end of the course, each student will be able to process and analyze large-scale NGS datasets and interpret the results. This course is intended only for graduate students who are interested in applying genomic approaches in their thesis research. At a minimum, students must have basic familiarity with working in a UNIX/Linux computing environment. Prior experience with shell scripting or a scripting language such as Perl, Python, or Ruby is strongly recommended. Interested students must contact the instructor early in the fall term to discuss their prior experience and expectations for the course. Enrollment limited to twenty. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. J. Noonan

GENE 777b/MCDB 677b, Mechanisms of Development An advanced course on mechanisms of animal development focusing on the genetic specification of cell organization and identity during embryogenesis and somatic differentiation. The use of evolutionarily conserved signaling pathways to carry out developmental decisions in a range of animals is highlighted. Course work includes student participation in critical analysis of primary literature and a research proposal term paper. V. Reinke and staff

GENE 840a and b, Medical Genetics Elective Students participate in the diagnosis and management of fetuses, children, and adults with genetic disorders or who are at risk for genetic disorders. Patients are assigned to students for counseling and diagnostic evaluation, and for presentation at conferences. A laboratory experience in one of our genetics laboratories (Cytogenetics, Biochemical, and Molecular) is arranged according to the interest of the student. Twenty hours per week. One or two students every two or four weeks. Director: H.Z. Zhang

GENE 900a/CBIO 900a/MCDB 900a, First-Year Introduction to Research—Grant Writing and Scientific Communication Grant writing, scientific communication, and laboratory rotation talks for Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development track students. S. Holley and faculty

GENE 901b/CBIO 901b/MCDB 901b, First-Year Introduction to Research—Ethics: Scientific Integrity in Biomedical Research Ethics and laboratory rotation talks for Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development track students. J. Bewersdorf

GENE 911a/CBIO 911a/MCDB 911a, First Laboratory Rotation First laboratory rotation for Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development track students. C. Crews

GENE 912b/CBIO 912b/MCDB 912b, Second Laboratory Rotation Second laboratory rotation for Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development track students. C. Crews

GENE 913b/CBIO 913b/MCDB 913b, Third Laboratory Rotation Third laboratory rotation for Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development track students. C. Crews

GENE 921a and b, Reading Course in Genetics and Molecular Biology Directed reading with faculty. Term paper required. Prerequisite: permission of Genetics DGS.

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Global Health

Office of International Medical Student Education: ESH 214, 203.785.5937

http://medicine.yale.edu/globalhealth

GH 700/EPH 591, Global Health Seminar The Global Health Seminar is a yearlong, weekly elective intended for students in the health professions to develop an understanding of key aspects of global health research and practice. The objective is for students to attain a good understanding of key issues upon which they may base future research, service, and clinical pursuits in the field of global health. As the course involves students and faculty from all of the health professions, its participatory and collaborative nature provides a rich environment for interdisciplinary dialogue. Over the course of the fall term, lectures focus on global health history and architecture and advocacy, and the modules in 2014–2015 focus on neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). Readings and class discussion. Each module concludes with student projects. Required of students in the Global Health Concentration at YSPH and of students in the Certificate in Global Medicine program at YSM. Faculty advisers: G. Friedland, T. Rabin, S. Shenoi (YSM); P. Ryan-Krause (YSN); M. Skonieczny (YSPH); R. Gonzalez-Colaso (PA)

GH 701, Topics in Global Medicine Topics in Global Medicine (formerly the Tropical Medicine course) is a student-led, case-based seminar that provides participants with a broad knowledge base in current globally important health issues. Each session focuses on a specific health concern and aims to integrate issues concerning epidemiology and prevention along with diagnosis and treatment in a case-based format and clinically relevant fashion. The specifics of medical management are not the priority for this course. Importantly, the course provides a forum for interactive discussions of the health issues that pose unique challenges in resource-limited settings. Most sessions are collaborative—a faculty instructor is paired with one or two students, and the team works together to research and present the topic. Typically, each session includes a one-hour lecture by the presenting team followed by a half-hour interactive discussion facilitated by the student presenters. The discussion format is flexible and will be guided by the particular session topic. The content might focus on ethical concerns, interesting research questions, preventive strategies, etc. The course is designed for students in all of the health profession programs, specifically physician associate (PA), nursing (YSN), medicine (YSM), and public health (YSPH) students who have an interest in the clinical aspects of global health; it is open to all members of the Yale community. Active participation is expected, whether by way of presenting a topic, leading a discussion session, or participating in the discussion. Upon completion of this course, students are able to (1) appreciate the spectrum of clinical diseases, both communicable and noncommunicable, affecting persons in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC); (2) identify the major principles and challenges of providing medical care in LMIC; (3) broadly outline methods of diagnosis, prevention, and treatment for diseases encountered in resource-limited settings; (4) appreciate the importance of public health interventions in dealing with these diseases; and (5) have the opportunity to collaborate with a faculty member on the presentation of a topic of interest. Participation in this class is highly encouraged for students and residents interested in applying for an international rotation. Director: J. Schwartz

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History of Medicine

SHM L132, 203.785.4338

http://medicine.yale.edu/histmed

Professors D. Kevles (History), S.E. Lederer (Adjunct), N. Rogers, F. Snowden (History), B.J. Strasser (Adjunct), W.C. Summers (Therapeutic Radiology), J.H. Warner (Chair)

Associate Professor M. Espinosa (Adjunct)

Assistant Professors P. Bertucci (History), H.M. Cowles, J. Radin

Yale College and Graduate School courses open to medical students:

HSHM 202a/AMST 247a/FILM 244a/HIST 147a/HLTH 170a, Media and Medicine in Modern America Relationships between medicine, health, and the media in the United States from 1870 to the present. The changing role of the media in shaping conceptions of the body, creating new diseases, influencing health and health policy, crafting the image of the medical profession, informing expectations of medicine and constructions of citizenship, and the medicalization of American life. J.H. Warner, G.K. Berland

HSHM 204a/AMST 163a/EVST 120a/HIST 120a, Introduction to Environmental History Ways in which people have shaped and been shaped by the changing environments of North America from precolonial times to the present. Migration of species and trade in commodities; contrasting uses of land; the impact of industry and markets; the rise of modern conservation and environmental movements; the development of public policy; the global search for resources by the United States. P. Sabin

HSHM 214b/HIST 402b, Extraterrestrials in History The notion of extraterrestrials and “radical others” in history and culture from antiquity to the present. Topics include other worlds and their inhabitants in ancient Greece; medieval debates on the plurality of worlds; angels, freaks, native Americans, and other “aliens” of the Renaissance; comet dwellers in puritan New England; Mars as a socialist utopia in the early twentieth century; and visitors from space in American popular culture. I. Dal Prete

HSHM 226b/HIST 236b/HUMS 342b, The Scientific Revolution The changing relationship between the natural world and the arts from Leonardo to Newton. Topics include Renaissance anatomy and astronomy, alchemy, and natural history. P. Bertucci

HSHM 235b/HIST 234b, Epidemics and Society in the West since 1600 A study of the impact of epidemic diseases such as bubonic plague, cholera, malaria, and AIDS on society, public health, and the medical profession in comparative and international perspective. Topics include popular culture and mass hysteria, the mortality revolution, urban renewal and rebuilding, sanitation, the germ theory of disease, the emergence of scientific medicine, and debates over the biomedical model of disease. F. Snowden

HSHM 408b/HUMS 306b, Science and Human Sciences The modern dichotomy of natural science and human science, i.e., the totality of disciplines devoted to human experience, as it has developed from the mid-seventeenth century to the present. Focus on key works by Galileo Galilei, Giambattista Vico, Charles Darwin, and Terrence Deacon. The shifting relations of Western understandings of the natural and human realms. G. Tomlinson

HSHM 409b/HIST 416Jb/PSYC 401b, Minds and Brains from Phrenology to fMRI A survey of the science and medicine of mind and brain since 1800. Topics include madness and the asylum; phrenology and psychoanalysis; psychology in politics, law, and advertising; the rise of the “neuro-” disciplines; and mental health in public life. Sources from fields such as neurology, physiology, psychology, psychiatry, and philosophy. Readings from works by Darwin, James, Freud, Foucault, Chomsky, and Pinker.

HSHM 410a/HIST 149Ja, History of Pollution The science and politics of pollution issues from the late nineteenth century through the end of the twentieth. The rise of antipollution regulations; the emergence of environmental social movements; the role of scientific expertise in national and international policy making; changes in scientific, political, and public assessments of environmental risks.

HSHM 411a/HIST 141Ja, Science from Newton to Neutrons Major themes and ideas in science from the seventeenth century through the twentieth. Focus on evolving descriptions and theories of matter and energy, physics, and chemistry. The evolution of Newtonian ideas to the world of modern physics and the transition from alchemical thinking to the chemical revolution. W.C. Summers

HSHM 412b/HIST 429Jb, The History of the Laboratory The social and cultural history of the experimental laboratory as a site for scientific activity, from early modern origins to the present day. The early modern origins of the laboratory; private, institutional, and state laboratories; relations between labs and field stations; the lab in the colonial and developing world; industrial and corporate labs; laboratory architecture; secrecy and openness; gender in the experimental workplace; and popular representations of the laboratory. Undergraduate enrollment limited to juniors and seniors. C. Ramalingam

HSHM 422b/HIST 467Jb, Cartography, Territory, and Identity Exploration of how maps shape assumptions about territory, land, sovereignty, and identity. The relationship between scientific cartography and conquest, the geography of statecraft, religious cartographies, encounters between Western and non-Western cultures, and reactions to cartographic objectivity. Students make their own maps. No previous experience in cartography or graphic design required.

HSHM 437b/HIST 435Jb, The Global Crisis of Malaria The global crisis of malaria examined in comparative and historical context. The mosquito theory of transmission and other developments in scientific understanding of the disease; World Health Organization strategies to eradicate malaria since 1955; the development of tools such as insecticides, medication, and bed nets; the attempt to create an effective vaccine. F. Snowden

HSHM 459a/HIST 159Ja/HUMS 359a, Spies, Secrets, and Science The relationship between secrecy, intellectual property, and science from the Middle Ages to the Cold War. Topics include alchemy and esoteric knowledge; the Manhattan Project and other secret scientific projects run by the state; the history of patents and copyright laws; and scientists as spies. P. Bertucci

HSHM 468b/HIST 254Jb, Sex, Life, and Generation Theories and practices of life, sex, and generation in Western civilization. Politics and policies of conception and birth; social control of abortion and infanticide in premodern societies; theories of life and gender; the changing status of the embryo; the lure of artificial life. I. Dal Prete

HSHM 656aU/HIST 949aU, Photography and the Sciences Does photography belong in the history of art, or does its status as an “automatic” or “scientific” recording technique and its many uses in the sciences distinguish its history from that of earlier visual media? How does photography look when we approach it from the cultural history of science? How might its role in the sciences have shaped photographic aesthetics in the arts? This course examines the making of photography’s discursive identity as an experimental and evidentiary medium in the sciences, from its announcement to the public in 1839 to the digital innovations of the present day. We take a historical and archival perspective on uses for (and debates over) photography in different fields of the natural and human sciences, grounded in visits to photographic collections at Yale. C. Ramalingam

HSHM 680aU/HIST 911aU, History of Chinese Science Major themes in Chinese scientific thinking from antiquity to the twentieth century. Non-Western concepts of nature and the development of science in China; East-West scientific exchanges; and China’s role in modern science. W.C. Summers

HSHM 701a/HIST 930a, Problems in the History of Medicine and Public Health An examination of the variety of approaches to the social and cultural history of medicine and public health. Readings are drawn from recent literature in the field, sampling writings on health care, illness experiences, ideas, and medical cultures in Europe, the Americas, Asia, and Africa from antiquity to the twentieth century. Topics include the role of gender, class, ethnicity, race, religion, and region in the experience of health care and sickness; the intersection of lay and professional understandings of the body; and the role of the marketplace in shaping professional identities and patient expectations. J.H. Warner

HSHM 702b/HIST 931b, Problems in the History of Science Survey of classic and recent work in the history of science, broadly conceived. Topics include physical, life, and human sciences; role of technology and instruments; relationship between theory and practice; and interactions with society, politics, and capitalism. Focus on mastering debates in history of science, with connections to philosophy, anthropology, and literary studies. H.M. Cowles

HSHM 710a/HIST 921a, Problems in Science Studies Exploration of the methods and debates in the social studies of science, technology, and medicine. This course covers the history of the field and its current intellectual, social, and political positioning. It provides critical tools—including feminist, postcolonial, and new materialist perspectives—to address the relationships among science, technology, medicine, and society. J. Radin

HSHM 713b/HIST 913b, Geography and History A research seminar focused on methodological questions of geography and geographic analysis in historical scholarship. We consider approaches ranging from the Annales School of the early twentieth century to contemporary research in environmental history, history of science, urban history, and more. We also explore interdisciplinary work in social theory, historical geography, and anthropology and grapple with the promise (and drawbacks) of GIS. Students may write their research papers on any time period or geographic region, and no previous experience with geography or GIS is necessary. Open to undergraduates with permission of the instructor. W. Rankin

HSHM 736b/HIST 943b/WGSS 730b, Health Politics, Body Politics A reading seminar on struggles to control, pathologize, and normalize human bodies, with a particular focus on science, medicine, and the state, both in North America and in a broader global health context. Topics include disease, race, and politics; repression and regulation of birth control; the politics of adoption; domestic and global population control; feminist health movements; and the pathologizing and identity politics of disabled people. N. Rogers

HSHM 744b/AMST 839b/F&ES 843b/HIST 743b, Readings in Environmental History Readings and discussion of key works in environmental history. The course explores major forces shaping human-environment relationships, such as markets, politics, and ecological dynamics, and compares different approaches to writing about social and environmental change. P. Sabin

HSHM 914a or b, Research Tutorial I By arrangement with faculty.

HSHM 915a or b, Research Tutorial II By arrangement with faculty.

HSHM 920a or b, Independent Reading By arrangement with faculty.

HSHM 930a or b, Independent Research By arrangement with faculty.

In addition to formal course offerings and tutorials offered in the School of Medicine, Yale College, and the Graduate School, activities in the Section of History of Medicine are supplemented by a number of related historical medical programs. Colloquia in the History of Science and Medicine are held fortnightly and are open to the School of Medicine community. The section sponsors an annual Frederic L. Holmes Lecture, and the Department of Surgery sponsors the annual Samuel Clark Harvey Memorial Lecture. The Nathan Smith Club is composed of medical students interested in medical history. The Beaumont Medical Club, founded at Yale in 1920, sponsors six lectures in the History of Medicine during the academic year and annually selects a Beaumont Lecturer and a George Rosen Lecturer in the History of Medicine.

Section faculty are available for M.D. thesis supervision. Information about the History of Medicine M.D. thesis, and a list of recent titles, can be found at http://medicine.yale.edu/humanities/research/theses.aspx.

The section faculty work with the Department of History to offer a Ph.D. program in the History of Science and Medicine. In addition, there is an M.A. program designed particularly for those who plan to combine teaching or scholarship in these fields with a professional career in medicine or the life sciences. For further information concerning admissions and the program itself, consult the Graduate School bulletin.

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Immunobiology

TAC S625, 203.785.3857

http://medicine.yale.edu/immuno

Professors J.R. Bender (Medicine), A.L. Bothwell, L. Chen, J.E. Craft (Medicine), P. Cresswell, M.V. Dhodapkar (Medicine), V.D. Dixit (Comparative Medicine), R.A. Flavell (Chair), D.R. Goldstein (Medicine), D. Hafler (Neurology), K. Herold, A. Iwasaki, P.B. Kavathas (Laboratory Medicine), R.M. Medzhitov, J.S. Pober, C.R. Roy (Microbial Pathogenesis), N. Ruddle (Emerita), D.G. Schatz, M.J. Shlomchik (Laboratory Medicine; Adjunct), W.D. Shlomchik (Medicine), B. Su (Adjunct)

Associate Professors Tarek Fahmy (Biomedical Engineering), S. Kaech, S.H. Kleinstein, E.R. Meffre

Assistant Professors S.C. Eisenbarth (Laboratory Medicine), A.M. Haberman (Laboratory Medicine), M.A. Kriegel, J.P. Pereira, C.V. Rothlin

Research Scientists T.H. Chi, E.E. Eynon, M.S. Kluger

Associate Research Scientists P. Bielecki, W. Chae, P.R. Clark, T. Ghazi, J. Grotzke, D. Herndler-Brandstetter, N. Iijima, W. Ip, L. Kim, N.C. Kirkiles-Smith, E.B. Kopp, Y. Kumamoto, R.M. Leonhardt, Y. Li, T.D. Manes, Y. Okabe, S.D. Pope, A. Rongvaux, E. Roulis, R.B. Seth, M. Taura, N. Vudattu, T. Willinger, G. Zhu

For a complete listing of immunology-related courses, see http://bbs.yale.edu.

IBIO 530a/MCDB 530au, Biology of the Immune System The development of the immune system. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of immune recognition. Effector responses against pathogens. Immunologic memory and vaccines. Human diseases including allergy, autoimmunity, cancer, immunodeficiency, HIV/AIDS. C.V. Rothlin, P. Cresswell, K. Herold, A. Iwasaki, S. Kaech, R.M. Medzhitov, E.R. Meffre, J.P. Pereira, D.G. Schatz, M.J. Shlomchik

IBIO 531b, Advanced Immunology The historical development and central paradigms of key areas in immunology. The course attempts to develop a clear understanding of how these paradigms were established experimentally. Landmark studies are discussed to determine how the conclusions were obtained and why they were important at the time they were done. Lecture and discussion format; readings of primary research papers and review articles. Prerequisite: IBIO 530a or equivalent. Enrollment limited to fifteen. A.L. Bothwell and faculty

IBIO 539b, Advanced Immunology Seminar: Cancer Immunology M.V. Dhodapkar, L. Chen, K. Politi

IBIO 600a, Introduction to Research: Faculty Research Presentations Introduction to the research interests of the faculty. Required of all first-year Immunology/BBS students. Pass/Fail. S. Kaech and faculty

IBIO 601b/CB&B 601b, Fundamentals of Research: Responsible Conduct of Research A weekly seminar presented by faculty trainers on topics relating to proper conduct of research. Required of first-year Immunobiology students, first-year CB&B students, and training grant-funded postdocs. Pass/Fail. S. Kaech and faculty

IBIO 603b, Responsible Conduct of Research, Refresher Course The NIH requires that students receive training in the responsible conduct of research every four years. This course meets that requirement for fourth-year students. The course has two components: (1) one large-group session is held for all fourth-year students through the BBS; the main topics are scientific misconduct and authorship; (2) two Immunobiology faculty facilitate discussions based on RCR topics, gathered in advance from the students; anonymous or hypothetical stories are selected by the faculty and discussed in a workshop environment in which students are then asked to analyze each case and suggest courses of actions.

IBIO 611a, Research Rotation 1 Intensive experience in the design and execution of experiments in immunology or other areas of biology. Students design a focused research project in consultation with a faculty mentor and execute the designed experiments in the mentor’s laboratory. Students are expected to read relevant background papers from the literature, design and perform experiments, interpret the resulting data, and propose follow-up experiments. Students are also expected to attend the mentor’s weekly lab meeting(s) as well as weekly Immunobiology departmental seminars and Research in Progress seminars. The course concludes with the student giving a brief presentation of the work performed at Rotation Talks, attended by other first-year immunology-track graduate students. Evaluation is by the mentor; students also evaluate the rotation experience. Students must turn in a prioritized list of four possible mentors to Barbara Cotton in the office of the director of graduate studies at least one week prior to the beginning of the course. Mentors are assigned by the DGS. Graded Pass/Fail. Course dates are Sept. 15–Dec. 5. (1 course credit; minimum of 20 hours/week). Required of all first-year Immunology/BBS students. S. Kaech and faculty

IBIO 612b, Research Rotation 2 See description under IBIO 611a. Course dates are Jan. 9–March 13. A.L. Bothwell and faculty

IBIO 613b, Research Rotation 3 See description under IBIO 611a. Course dates are March 16–May 22. A.L. Bothwell and faculty

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Internal Medicine

Boardman 110, 203.785.4119

http://medicine.yale.edu/intmed

Professors J.I. Allen, R.J. Alpern, F. Altice, V.A. Andriole (Emeritus), P.S. Aronson, P.W. Askenase, W.P. Batsford (Emeritus), J.R. Bender, F.J. Bia (Emeritus), M.J. Bia, H.J. Binder (Emeritus), L.K. Bockenstedt, C.H. Boshoff (Adjunct), J.L. Boyer, A.E. Broadus (Emeritus), R. Bucala, L.M. Buckley, H.S. Cabin, C. Canessa (Cellular & Molecular Physiology), L.G. Cantley, L. Chen (Immunobiology), J.H. Cho (Adjunct), N.A. Christakis (Sociology), M.W. Cleman, L.S. Cohen (Emeritus), D.L. Coleman (Emeritus), J.P. Concato, L.M. Cooney, J. Costa (Pathology), P.V. Coveney (Adjunct), J.E. Craft, S.T. Crowley, J.E. Deanfield (Adjunct), L. Dembry, G.V. Desir, V.T. DeVita, M.V. Dhodapkar, M.A. Drickamer (Emeritus), T.P. Duffy (Emeritus), J.P. Eder, A. Eichmann, J.A. Elias (Emeritus), D.G. Federman, D.A. Fiellin, E. Fikrig, R.L. Fisher, B.G. Forget (Emeritus), J.N. Forrest, F.M. Foss, L. Frankel, T.R. Fried, G. Friedland, G. Garcia-Tsao, J.B. Gee (Emeritus), R.H. Gifford (Emeritus), T.M. Gill, J.A. Goffinet (Emeritus), D.R. Goldstein, F. Gorelick, M.L. Green, C.P. Gross, R.J. Groszmann (Emeritus), R. Herbst, K. Herold (Immunobiology), W.J. Hierholzer (Emeritus), K.K. Hirschi, H.S. Hochster, E.S. Holmboe (Adjunct), R.J. Homer (Pathology), R.I. Horwitz (Emeritus), J.S. Hughes, S.J. Huot, S. Inouye (Adjunct), K.L. Insogna, S.E. Inzucchi, C. Jaffe (Emeritus), D. Jain (Pathology), P.A. Jamidar, A.C. Justice, N. Kaminski, F.S. Kantor, C.R. Kapadia, W.N. Kernan, H. Kluger, A.I. Ko (Epidemiology), M.J. Kozal, H.M. Krumholz, M. Kryger, J. Lacy, L. Laine, M. Landry (Laboratory Medicine), F.A. Lee, R.J. Levine, R.P. Lifton (Genetics), R.C. Lilenbaum, T.J. Lynch (Chair), M.J. Mamula, R.A. Marottoli, J.C. Marsh (Emeritus), J.F. Martin (Adjunct), R.A. Matthay (Emeritus), W.J. McKenna (Adjunct), G. McMahon (Adjunct), P.K. Mistry, V. Mohsenin, M.H. Nathanson, P.G. O’Connor, A.J. Peixoto, M.A. Perazella, K.F. Petersen, D. Petrylak, P.A. Preisig, D.D. Proctor, L. Pusztai, V.J. Quagliarello, B.S. Ramakrishna (Adjunct), A. Rastegar, N.S. Redeker (Nursing), C. Redlich, D.L. Rimm (Pathology), H.M. Rinder (Laboratory Medicine), M.E. Robert (Pathology), J.D. Roberts, S.H. Rosenbaum (Anesthesiology), M.B. Russi, R. Safirstein, M.A. Schwartz, W.C. Sessa (Pharmacology), R.S. Sherwin, W.D. Shlomchik (Adjunct), G.I. Shulman, M.D. Siegel, M. Simons, A.J. Sinusas, B.R. Smith (Laboratory Medicine), S. Somlo, R. Soufer, C. Stefanadis (Adjunct), R.L. Steinbrook (Adjunct), M. Strazzabosco (Adjunct), M. Sznol, L. Tanoue, M.E. Tinetti, R.J. Vender, F.S. Wright, J.J. Wysolmerski, L.H. Young, B.L. Zaret (Emeritus)

Associate Professors C. Abraham, M.M. Abu-Khalaf, J.G. Akar, H.G. Allore, N.R. Angoff, D.E. Antin-Ozerkis, H.R. Aslanian, C. Ben Mamoun, G.K. Berland, J.S. Bogan, J. Boyer (Adjunct), J. Brennan, U.C. Brewster, H. Cain, H.H. Chao, S.I. Chaudhry, C. Chung, G.L. Chupp, G.W. Cline, H. Cohen (Adjunct), L.E. Cohn, J.M. Coviello (Nursing), J.P. Curtis, N.K. Dahl, H.A. Deshpande, M.P. DiGiovanna, B.R. Doolittle, D.W. Dunne, J.D. Dziura (Emergency Medicine), M.S. Ellman, J. Evans, J.J. Farell, L.E. Fiellin, R.N. Formica, A.H. Fortin, C.A. Fragoso, I. Genao, S.N. Gettinger, F.J. Giordano, B.I. Gulanski, S.G. Haskell, J.B. Henrich, E.L. Herzog, E.H. Holt, L.I. Horwitz (Adjunct), J. Hwa, S. Ishibe, Y. Iwakiri, G.Y. Jenq, S. Jin (Adjunct), E.A. Jonas, M. Juthani-Mehta, A. Kamarulzaman (Adjunct), I. Kang, J.M. Kapo, B.I. Kazmierczak, J.E. Kerstetter (Adjunct), R.G. Kibbey, J. Koo, J.D. Kravetz, S. Kulkarni (Surgery), R.J. Lampert, A.J. Lansky, P. Lee, J.K. Lim, A. Mani, M.A. Marieb, S. Mark (Adjunct), P.W. Marks, K.A. Martin, R.A. Martinello, R.L. McNamara, E.R. Meffre (Immunobiology), W.Z. Mehal, G.C. Michaud, R.R. Montgomery, J.P. Moriarty, L.J. Morrison, A.B. Nagar, C.R. Parikh, S.E. Pfau, M.A. Pisani, P. Protiva, P.M. Rabinowitz (Adjunct), A.B. Reisman, M.S. Remetz, C. Rochester, M.G. Rose, J.R. Rosenbaum, L.E. Rosenfeld, J.S. Ross, C.B. Ruser, R.R. Russell, M.M. Sadeghi, V.T. Samuel, L. Sanders, M. Schilsky, S.E. Seropian, J.F. Setaro, A.C. Shaw, M.N. Smith, A.N. Sofair, S.A. Springer, L. Sugeng, R. Sutton, T.H. Taddei, O.A. Taiwo (Adjunct), T.K. Trow, J. Van Rhee, M.S. Villanueva, L.M. Walke, D.M. Windish, H.K. Yaggi, T. Zheng, Z. Zhu (Pediatrics)

Assistant Professors A.K. Abu-Alfa (Adjunct), K.B. Adelson, A.M. Ahasic, K.M. Akgun, K.N. Alavian (Adjunct), A. Annamalai (Psychiatry), L. Aoun-Barakat, W.S. Asch, D. Assis, R.A. Attaran, D.B. Banach, M.R. Basso (Adjunct), W.C. Becker, R. Belfort De Aguiar, L. Bellumkonda, C.W. Bergwitz, P.S. Bhatt, R.S. Brienza, D. Brissette, C.M. Brunet, O. Chan, H. Chao, L.A. Chaptini, A. Chiang, H.J. Chun, G.G. Chung, J.F. Clancy, S. Coca (Adjunct), S. Cole, G.R. Connors, C. Cromwell, D.J. Curran, C.S. Dela Cruz, S.G. Deftereos (Adjunct), N. Desai, K. Dharmarajan, L.S. Dugdale, E.J. Edelman, S.C. Eisenbarth (Laboratory Medicine), R.W. Elder (Pediatrics), P.J. Ellis, B. Emu, L. Fabris (Adjunct), W.H. Fares, M.K. Fikrig, A.F. Fisher, C.A. Flannery (Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences), R. Fogerty, J.K. Forrest, B.E. Fortune, J.V. Freeman, R.L. Garcia, A. Garino, D.S. Geller, G. Giannopoulos (Adjunct), S.B. Goldberg, R. Gonzalez-Colaso, B.E. Gould Rothberg, M. Grant, D. Greif, M. Gulati, C.G. Gunderson, S. Halene, I.E. Hall, C. Hatzis, S.F. Hay, J. Herrin (Adjunct), R.I. Herzog, E.W. Hofstatter, S.R. Holt, S. Honiden, R. Hoque, C.J. Howes, M.E. Hurwitz, A. Hyson, A.B. Imaeda, I. Isufi, D.L. Jacoby, F. Jadbabaie, S.S. Jakab, A.M. Jastreboff, S. Jeffery (Adjunct), L.B. Jilaveanu, M. Kang, A.K. Karihaloo (Adjunct), S.S. Kashaf, J.W. Kim, N. Kim, F. Knauf (Adjunct), J. Koff, R. Koski (Adjunct), C.I. Kossyvakis (Adjunct), M.A. Kriegel (Immunobiology), N. Krishnan, C. Kumar, P. Kumar, R.E. Laff, A.I. Lee, G.S. Lee, J. Li, A.H. Liapakis, B.A. Lin, K.J. Lipska, R. Luciano, B.C. Lupsa, U. Makris (Adjunct), M. Malinis, B.J. Malm, P. Mannam, E.P. Marin, P.S. Marshall, R.J. McCrimmon (Adjunct), K.C. McKenzie, E.C. McNay (Adjunct), J.L. Meadows, M.C. Mecca, P. Meier (Adjunct), C.I. Mena, J.P. Meyer, T.A. Molisse, A. Moll (Adjunct), E. Moreyra (Adjunct), V.A. Morris, A.R. Morrison, S. Mougalian, M. Murakami (Adjunct), T.E. Murphy, K Nandigam, R.J. Nardino, N. Neparidze, S. Nicoli, O. O’Hara, O.E. Ogbuagu, P. Oray-Schrom, S. Parikh (Epidemiology), T.L. Parker, M. Pillai, N.A. Podoltsev, J.D. Possick, C.C. Price, J.T. Puchalski, L. Puglisi, A.T. Putnam, Y. Qyang, T. Rabin, A.M. Reed, R.A. Rienzo, C. Ritsema, E.M. Roessler, D.I. Rosenthal, C. Ruhrberg (Adjunct), C.J. Sakr (Adjunct), M.J. Sanchez, T. Sanft, C.B. Sankey, J.R. Satchell-Jones, S.M. Schnittman (Adjunct), A.R. Schwartz, J. Schwartz, S. Shenoi, A.C. Shirali, L.A. Simprini, J.M. Siner, S. Soares, E.S. Spatz, J.F. Spelman, C. Spirli, S.M. Stein, J. Stepczynski, M.P. Strout, L.G. Suter, S. Takyar, J. Talwalkar, J.M. Testani, J.M. Tetrault, N. Thande, D.G. Tobin, J. Turner, L.S. Vasquez, E. Wang, Y. Wang (Adjunct), L.M. Whitman, F.P. Wilson, C. Won, E.Y. Wong, R. Worthington (Adjunct), X. Yan, X. Yao, A.M. Zeidan

Instructors A.M. Ahmed, S.S. Akhtar, C.J. Britto-Leon, W. Chang, E. Cristea, J.L. Gomez Villalobos, J. Herazo-Maya, E. Hsieh, J.J. Hwang, S. Jayasuriya, M.J. Jurczak, M.P. Knauert, R.Y. Lefkowitz, J. McLaughlin, S. Pandey, B. Richards, S. Rinne, M. Sauler, M.R. Stacy, A. Tarabar, E. Torrazza Perez, A. Valika, R. Wadia, C.J. Winterbottom

Senior Research Scientists M. Ananthanarayanan, H.J. Binder, A.E. Broadus, S. Cai, L.S. Cohen, L. Han, L. Leng, Y. Liu, R.A. Matthay, W.M. Philbrick, C.J. Soroka, E.C. Thrower, P.H. Van Ness, L. Wen, A.V. Wisnewski, J. Yu, B.L. Zaret, Z. Zhuang

Research Scientists S. Alfano, D.I. Baker, D.E. Befroy (Diagnostic Radiology), A.A. Belperron, J. Choi, J.M. Juergensmeier, S. Narasimhan, D.C. Tirziu, H. Velazquez, C.M. Viscoli, J. Zhang

Associate Research Scientists M. Abdelmessih, F. Ahangari, M. Aslan, O. Bartulos-Encinas, J.M. Belcher, K. Blount, A. Bregasi, S.N. Brown, M. Budatha, Y. Cai, P. Chen, R. Chen, S.J. Cheng, A.K. Coskun, C.J. Cutter, K. Dong, H.A. Doyle, X. Du, X. Fan, R. Fiorotto, A. Gallagher, A.K. Gattu, M.T. Guerra, X. Guo, J. Han, M. Haslip, M. Hedl, K. Hieftje, Y. Hu, Y. Hu, Y. Huang, Z. Jiang, L. Jozsef, J. Jung, E.J. Kaftan, H. Kim, J. Kim, K. Kim, M. Kish, J. Lee, S.H. Lee, M. Li, P.P. Licznerski, J. Liu, L. Liu, M. Ma, A. Marlier, G.J. McAvay, N. Mnatsakanyan, S. Mohanty, A. Nassar, C.R. Oladele, X. Ouyang, I. Papangeli, D. Qi, L. Qin, V.S. Ramgolam, V.S. Rao, M. Razavian, Y. Ren, J.M. Rhodes, J. Ruan, M. Schniederberend, J. Schwartz, H. Shen, W. Shi, M. Shin, R. Singh, A. Srivastava, R. Srivastava, M.H. Stowe, B. Sun, H. Sun, S. Sutton, K.L. Swan, N. Tai, W. Tang, J.P. Tate, T.M. Thompson, R.B. Thomson, X. Tian, X. Tian, M. Trentalange, P. Vagenas, V. Wali, K. Wang, P. Wang, Y. Wang, Y. Wei, J. Wickersham, Y. Wu, Y. Xie, M. Yang, T. Yarovinsky, Y. Ye, F. You, G. Yu, J. Yureneva, A. Zelenev, X. Zhang, Y. Zhang, Y. Zhao

Clinical Professors J. Belsky, J.B. Borak (Epidemiology), J.M. Boyce, M.H. Brand, K.L. Cohen, N. Dainiak, F.O. Finkelstein, D.S. Fischer, L. Friedman, A.S. Kliger, N.J. Marieb, C.A. McPherson, D.N. Podell, R.T. Schoen, M.H. Schoenfeld, C.B. Seelig, C.B. Sherter, S.M. Winter, B.J. Wu

Associate Clinical Professors G.G. Abdelsayed, S. Aronin, S.A. Atlas, M.C. Bennick, S.T. Bogardus, S.D. Brenner, R.D. Bruce, G.K. Buller, M.M. Burg, C.A. Caldwell, J.P. Cleary, W.B. Crede, C.A. Disabatino, K.J. Dobuler, A.B. Douglass, S.M. Epstein, E.L. Etkind, J.J. Garsten, D.I. Geisser, R.A. Gelfand, A.V. Granata, L.E. Grauer, F.D. Haeseler, L.W. Hammers (Diagnostic Radiology), H.L. Haronian, K.A. Hutchinson, S.G. Jones, G.J. Kerins, G.I. Lancaster, A. Lebowitz, W.S. Long, R.W. Lyons, E.P. Mardh, A.M. Marino, B.A. Martell, A.B. Mayerson, E.M. Mazur, R.M. McLean, D.J. Miller, E.D. Moritz, S.J. Moses, P.B. Nussbaum, J.M. Perlotto, J.H. Revkin, J.R. Sabetta, M.L. Schwartz, M.F. Simms, J.F. Sullivan, H.L. Taubin, R. Torres, E. Vosburgh, S.B. Weissman, K.H. Yang, S.W. Zarich

Assistant Clinical Professors R.M. Aaronson, A.J. Accomando, E.D. Agin, O.T. Akande, L. Alaparthi, J. Alexander, R. Alfano-Kostenka, Y. Amoateng-Adjepong, S.K. Apgar, V.S. Argento, C.A. Arnold, S. Asefaw, P. Asiedu, P. Bahuguna, T.J. Balcezak, J.M. Banatoski, G.V. Bedarida, A. Bedford, A.M. Bekui, L. Berman, S.M. Bernheim, D.J. Berube, M.L. Blitzer, J.M. Blumberg, F. Boateng, N.A. Bonheim, B. Boyd, T. Braverman, J. Breen, R. Breier, J.A. Brier, D. Brock, C. Brown, L. Burgo-Black, A.R. Cadariu, K.E. Calia, L.L. Calo, E.M. Carlson, B.J. Chan, J.J. Chang, C. Chen, D.M. Chess, D. Chia, L.M. Chou, H.S. Chowdhary, J.J. Chuong, M.I. Chustecki, M.A. Ciampi, P.R. Cimino, R.B. Cooper, J.A. Cosgriff, A.J. Cusano, W.L. Cushing, S.B. D’Cunha, M.A. Demetrius, O.M. Deshpande, D. Desir, A.J. Dhond, P. Dogbey, T.A. Doherty, J.T. Dreznick, M.H. Driesman, D.J. Edwards, D.J. Eilbott, T.D. Eisen, J.M. Elser, J.J. Ernstoff, N. Fahmi, E. Fan, I. Feintzeig, T. Feld, D. Fine, F.A. Flatow, M.H. Floch, M.J. Franco, J.H. Fullerton, J.E. Gage, L.S. Galante, P.N. Geimer, S. Geller, R.S. Generoso, B.J. Gerstenhaber, P. Gibbs, R.D. Gibbs, P.A. Goldberg, G. Goldenberg, S.M. Gordon-Dole, D.I. Grayer, M.S. Grogan, S. Gupta, T.K. Gupta, J.H. Hansson, D.J. Hass, J.K. Henchel, D.G. Hill, C.F. Hollander, D. Hollister, X. Hong, L.J. Huang, R.G. Huntley, C.D. Illick, O.T. Imevbore, P.E. Jaffe, P.M. Jenei, L. Jung, S.V. Kanade, A. Karne, D. Kaufman, M.A. Kazakoff, G. Kelley, J. Kleinstein, H. Knight, C.R. Kramer, H.M. Kramer, M.L. Kraus, S.H. Kunkes, J.M. Lai, S. Lam, M. Lataillade, U. Latif, R.E. Lebson, M. Lee, R.J. Lewis, E. Liben, H.M. Likier, L.S. Lim, C.S. Loeser, R.I. Lovins, S.K. Majumdar, M.A. Mankus, M.E. Mann, V. Martin, U. Masiukiewicz, S.W. McCalley, R.J. McDonald, C.C. McNair, C.F. McNamara, S.G. Menon, N. Merchant, J.A. Merritt, K. Michels-Ashwood, S.P. Mickley, D.T. Miller, E.A. Mirabile-Levens, A. Mohammad, J. Morris, M.M. Munteanu, J.I. Nadelmann, N. Nanda, H. Nawaz, A.M. Nelson, K.K. Nelson, E.A. Nolfo, R. Nudel, C. Nwangwu, J.W. O’Brien, S.P. O’Mahony, G. Oliver, B.R. Olson, K. Olson, J.M. Oshlick, O.I. Otolorin, J.R. Ouellette, W.T. Panullo, W.N. Pearson, B. Peck, A.E. Perrin, M. Perrotti, F. Petruzziello, L. Pham, D. Phanumas, M. Pouresmail, B.M. Priest, E. Prior, P.H. Pronovost, T.E. Quan, H.L. Quentzel, D.C. Ranani, H.H. Reinhart, C.R. Rethy, M. Rho, N.I. Riegler, B. Ringstad, D. Roer, P.R. Rogol, S.E. Rosener, M.C. Rubinstein, L. Saberski, D.M. Sack, R.T. Sadock, J.A. Salvana, L.S. Samson, S.L. Saunders, J.A. Schmierer, H.M. Schwartz, N. Shah, J.M. Shi, W.Y. Shih, R.S. Silverman, K.S. Sinusas, M.L. Skluth, D.N. Smith, M.J. Smith, M.L. Smith, M.A. Stehney, L. Sussman, K.P. Swan, E.S. Swenson, G.F. Tansino, B.S. Thomas, P. Tietjen, J. Tomanelli, J.E. Topal, P.C. Tortora, K.J. Twohig, J.G. Uberti, R. Umashanker, S. Urciuoli, I. Vashist, H. Ward, W.S. Warren, K.E. Webb, R.B. Wein, R. Weissberger, K.P. White, D.M. Wolfsohn, A. Wormser, M. Zain, C.S. Zalis, F. Zarcu-Power, J.S. Zaretzky, J.S. Zesk, J.J. Zumpano, F.R. Zwas

Clinical Instructors O. Abreu-Lanfranco, S.A. Alston, L. Ameti, L.A. Anderson, D. Antonetti, A. Apoltan, G. Ashrafzadeh, H.H. Atkins, L. Bakkali, K.M. Baran, J.M. Belcher, R. Beri, M. Berkmen, C. Borz-Baba, A. Brahaj, R.M. Brammer, J.A. Brunetti, A.W. Camp, H. Carey, D. Casablanca (Nursing), J.P. Chandler, P. Chandler, V. Christiana, J.M. Chua-Reyes, T.M. Clarke, D.L. Copen, M.B. Courtney, S.A. D’Souza, A.R. Datunashvili, A.M. Davies, A. DeLisle, J.D. Demayo, M. Derosa, R. Desouza, S. Dey, P. Dhawan, M.P. Dorfman, P. Drost, D.H. Dumont, A.M. Dunn, C.M. Edelmann, D.E. Evans, S.J. Farber, R.B. Feldman, P. Feuerstadt, R. Flores, M. Franco Vega, E.H. Francois, G. Gangu, M.W. Garber, H.B. Garfinkel, C.E. Glass, O.J. Green, K.N. Grieco, C. Gruss, M. Gupta, W.B. Hale, V. Harisis, J. Hauser, D.G. Heacock, J.C. Hlawitschka, S.M. Hoq, J. Huang, K. Jay, S.R. Joshi, E. Kang, K.A. Kaplove, D.L. Katz, J.D. Kenkare, A. Khan, R. Khodzinsky, L. Knoll, A. Kohli-Pamnani, E.D. Kulaga, M.E. Kulaga, A.S. Kunte, C. Kurlander, C. Ligon, S.R. Lin, F.A. Loria, N.T. Manickam, R. McLeod-Labissiere, C.J. Michos, J.D. Miller, R.L. Miller, D. Moll, E. Montesino, R.F. Morrison, A.S. Murray, G.J. Napolitano, E.R. Nash, S. Nawaz, E. Nemergut, S.N. Novack, E. Ofori-Mante, R. Ohene-Adjei, D. Olson, M. Orias, J.R. Orlinick, J.K. Pacini, W.W. Paramanathan, B. Patel, G.S. Pazhayattil, N. Pechter, T.E. Pellechi, J.F. Pezzimenti, K.C. Pham, L.J. Phillips, M. Plavec, V.B. Popov, P.T. Porello, H.R. Pun, N.G. Ragovis, S. Raissi, R.F. Ramos, Y. Riat, N. Rizk, T. Robey, A.J. Rodriguez, R.R. Rohatsch, M. Rosenthal, S.T. Rottinghaus, J. Samuel, S.M. Santana, R.R. Savino, R. Scatena, K.V. Schwartz, M.B. Schwartz, A.E. Selkin, D.L. Sewell, I. Shalom, S. Sharma, R.K. Shaw, J.F. Shea, N. Sheikh, B.V. Sheynberg, B.A. Skudlarska, D.C. Stair, A.J. Stannard, R.H. Stember, R.P. Streeter, A. Taneja, A. Teng, J.N. Thompson, S. Tiyyagura, A. Tota-Maharaj, G.E. Tratt, J.S. Urbanetti, F. Urbano, A. Usmani, D.J. Van Rhijn, I.D. Weir, O.G. Weis, S.C. Widman, F.E. Williams, B. Yeboah, R.A. Zlotoff

Lecturers D. Acampora, B. Adelsberg, E. Balica, A. Bhutta, M. Cabrera Martinez, Z. Chauhan, S. Cord, P.C. Cremer, J. Donroe, M. Evans, J.D. Ferholt, J. Goetz (Nursing), R. Henry, Z. Ker, R. Linden, R.R. Mahali, P. Maher, J. Marino, R. Nadkarni, E. Rippel, J. Salay, M.D. Slade, R.W. Smith, L. Street, M. Syed, R.N. Tuktamyshov, M. Vahey, Y. Wang, S. Williams

MD 2000 (IM)/MD 2025 (NEUR), Medical Approach to the Patient This twelve-week integrated clerkship includes internal medicine (eight weeks) and neurology (four weeks) clinical components. Throughout the clerkship, students participate in integrated experiences that address the themes related to hospital-based care such as management of acute disease, diagnostic skills, transitions of care, quality improvement, and organ systems. Directors: D.B. DiCapua, D.W. Dunne

MD 2050 (IM)/MD 2075 (Psych), Primary Care and Psychiatry Clerkship This twelve-week integrated clerkship includes ambulatory internal medicine and psychiatry clinical components, as well as outpatient pediatrics and OB/Gyn. Students participate in one four-week full-time placement at a primary care practice in Connecticut and one four-week part-time placement, which co-occurs with a part-time psychiatry consult placement. The psychiatry component of the clerkship includes four weeks of full-time inpatient psychiatry, four weeks part-time consultation psychiatry, and eight half-days in an ambulatory psychiatry setting. This integrated clerkship emphasizes themes such as health promotion and disease prevention, social determinants of health, behavioral change, systems-based care, and management of chronic disease. Directors: W.N. Kernan, K.M. Wilkins

IM 122, Endocrinology Elective The student participates as an active member of the endocrine training program, making daily rounds with the endocrine fellows, residents, and attending physicians. The student works primarily on the inpatient consult service at Yale-New Haven Hospital and has the opportunity to attend selected endocrine clinics at YNHH and the West Haven VA Medical Center. The student also participates in the regularly scheduled metabolism-endocrine conferences. Full-time. One student every four weeks. Director: S.E. Inzucchi

IM 123, Nephrology Elective This elective in clinical nephrology offers the student an opportunity for in-depth learning regarding problems in fluid and electrolyte disturbances, acute renal failure, chronic renal failure, and hypertension. Emphasis is placed on problem recognition, pathophysiologic diagnosis, evidence-based clinical judgment, and management based on pathophysiologic principles. The primary activity involves the inpatient consultation service in which the student works up and follows several patients per week, and participates in daily rounds with the attending physicians, postdoctoral fellows, and residents on service. An introduction to hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, renal transplantation, and renal biopsy histology is also provided. Full-time. One student every two or four weeks. Director: J. Turner

IM 136, Digestive Disease Conference Each Friday afternoon from 2 to 3:30 p.m., current patients with gastrointestinal and liver problems of medical, surgical, pediatric, pathologic, or radiologic interest are presented and discussed. This is a practical series of discussions intended to interest anyone from a second-year student to a practitioner. Active participation by all who come is encouraged. Meets in Fitkin. Digestive Disease faculty

IM 137, Gastroenterology Elective The student is an integral part of the inpatient GI consult service, working primarily in an inpatient setting. This is an opportunity to see a wide variety of gastrointestinal problems and patients, with discussion and review. Students should plan to attend this rotation on a full-time basis. Open to fourth-year students only. One or two students every two or four weeks. Director: S.S. Jakab

IM 141, Cardiology Elective The student participates in the daily activities of the inpatient cardiology consult service, including rounds, consultations, and conferences, and gains exposure to procedures such as cardiac catheterization, stress testing, echocardiography, nuclear imaging, and electrocardiography. The training experience emphasizes the physiologic basis for clinical manifestations of cardiovascular diseases, and their therapy. A collection of pertinent review articles is provided. Limited to one student at Yale-New Haven Hospital every four weeks and one student at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, every two or four weeks. Directors: J. Brennan (Yale-New Haven Hospital); B.J. Malm (VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven)

IM 142, Infectious Disease Elective This elective offers a robust learning experience in general infectious diseases, including the diagnostic evaluation and management of common community-acquired and nosocomial infections in a diverse patient population, as well as infections in the immunocompromised patient. There are opportunities for learning in subspecialty areas such as medical microbiology, transplant ID, HIV/AIDS, hospital infection control, antimicrobial stewardship, and sexually transmitted diseases. Students participate as active members of the consultation and training program in infectious diseases at Yale-New Haven Hospital and are expected to attend and participate in daily attending rounds, microbiology rounds four times a week, weekly clinical conferences, and monthly journal clubs. Evaluations are based on performance in clinical case presentations on the consult service. One student every four weeks. Director: O. Ogbuagu

IM 146, Hematology Elective This elective provides intensive exposure to clinical hematology by direct participation in the activities of a regular clinical hematology service. Students work up new patients and consults in rotation with the fellows and residents, and attend outpatient clinics. Students participate in daily hematology ward rounds and bone marrow readings, and in weekly inpatient and outpatient clinical reviews and clinical research conferences. One student every two weeks. Four-week rotations are available for visiting students. Director: A.I. Lee

IM 151/EHS 575a, Introduction to Occupational and Environmental Medicine This course presents a broad overview of the principles of occupational and environmental medicine. The major diseases of environmental origin and the major hazards—chemical, physical, and biologic—and settings in which they occur are examined. M.H. Stowe

IM 152, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Elective This rotation is designed to provide senior medical students (and PA and nursing students) with an introduction to the principles and practice of occupational and environmental medicine, including exposure, assessment, and evaluation of disease causality. Students learn how to evaluate workplace and environmental exposures and assess the contribution of such exposures to patients’ diseases. In addition, students participate in ongoing didactic and research conferences and workplace surveillance programs, and they visit workplaces and other environmental sites that are being evaluated for their role in disease causation. Students are exposed to the varied opportunities for careers in this discipline. One student every two or four weeks. Director: R.Y. Lefkowitz; M. Gulati, H. Harari, A. Mohammad, C. Redlich, M.B. Russi, C.J. Sakr

IM 155, Internal Medicine Subinternship The subinternship offers students the opportunity to function in the role of an intern on an Internal Medicine inpatient team at Yale-New Haven Hospital, West Haven VA Medical Center, or Waterbury Hospital. Subinterns join a team consisting of an upper-year medical resident and an attending physician and are responsible for admitting patients, writing admission and daily progress notes, presenting cases on rounds, communicating with consultants, ordering medications and tests, and serving as the front-line physician for patients admitted to the hospital. Students are responsible for managing approximately half the number of patients typically managed by an Internal Medicine intern. The subinternship offers an outstanding opportunity to prepare for internship, whether the student intends to pursue a career in Internal Medicine or another specialty. Prerequisites: Internal Medicine Clerkships I and II. Four weeks. Codirectors: M.D. Siegel, D.W. Dunne

IM 156, Hepatology Elective The student is an integral part of the inpatient liver service, working primarily in an inpatient setting. This is an opportunity to see a wide variety of liver problems and patients, with discussion and review. Students should plan to attend this rotation on a full-time basis. Open to fourth-year students only. One or two students every two or four weeks. Director: S.S. Jakab

IM 159, Pulmonary Elective This elective is designed to provide medical students with an in-depth knowledge of respiratory diseases through consults on the patient care floors and through didactic sessions and directed reading. Students become an integral part of the pulmonary and critical care (PCCM) section consult service, working with the attending physician and PCCM fellow(s). From two to six new consults on average are seen daily. Students work closely with faculty and staff of the pulmonary group and participate in daily consulting and rounds. Students assist in the examination and treatment of patients with various cardiopulmonary diseases, including tuberculosis, chronic obstructive airway disease, asthma, lung cancer, bacterial and fungal lung infection, and other diagnostic problems. They receive practical instruction in chest images and pulmonary function tests and their interpretation, and in clinical and laboratory methods used for diagnosis and management, including intensive respiratory care and respiratory therapy, and they have an opportunity to observe fiberoptic bronchoscopy. Weekly didactic lectures are given in a number of areas relating to airway pharmacology, lung cell biology, and lung immunology (respiratory cells, immunologic reactions, etc.). Students are expected to learn (1) the differential diagnosis and treatment of respiratory disorders, (2) how to interpret pulmonary function tests, and (3) how to read a chest radiograph and understand the essentials of a chest CT scan. Maximum of three students every two or four weeks. Director: G. Connors

IM 180, Rheumatology Elective Students work closely with the faculty member and fellow assigned to the inpatient consultative service at both Yale-New Haven Hospital and the West Haven VA Medical Center. They attend rounds and evaluate patients with rheumatic conditions and other diseases with rheumatic manifestations. In addition, they participate in outpatient clinics, including two arthritis clinics and two general rheumatology clinics, and attend two weekly conferences sponsored by the Section of Rheumatology. One student every two or four weeks. Director: J. Evans

IM 181, Oncology Elective This is an advanced elective offered to students who have completed the third-year Internal Medicine Clerkship. It is designed to expose students to all aspects of clinical medical oncology by direct participation in the daily disease-specific outpatient oncology clinics at Yale Cancer Center. Working closely with the medical oncology fellows and attending physicians, students have the opportunity to work up patients with new cancer diagnoses and participate in the ongoing care of patients with diverse cancer diagnoses. Students participate as active members of the medical oncology training program, attending the regularly scheduled daily clinical conferences as well as weekly disease-specific multidisciplinary tumor boards and medical oncology fellow education conferences. Although the emphasis of the elective is on outpatient oncology in disease-specific units, students can also opt to work with the inpatient oncology team at Yale-New Haven Hospital. Rotations at the VA Cancer Center can be arranged as well. Maximum of three students every two or four weeks. Director: H.A. Deshpande

IM 184, Medical Informatics We explore topics in informatics, such as the definition and scope of the specialty, software engineering, networking and networks, database management systems, information retrieval, the electronic medical record, clinical decision support, and medical decision science. By arrangement with the instructor. R.N. Shiffman

IM 195, Medical Intensive Care Elective This elective provides an opportunity to participate in the acute management of common medical emergencies. Students are on call in the medical intensive care unit (MICU) at Yale-New Haven Hospital every fourth day with an intern and resident pair, assisting them in the admission of patients. Students follow patients in the MICU, assist in their care with the intern and resident, and are expected to present during rounds. Although students are exposed to a variety of ICU-based procedures, there are limited “hands-on” opportunities. Prerequisite: Internal Medicine Clerkship. No overnight responsibilities. One or two students every two or four weeks. Director: S. Honiden

IM 304, Analytical Clinical Cardiology Elective This rotation emphasizes a rigorous history and physical exam to develop a differential diagnosis to guide the care of patients in the hospital and clinic. Supplementary reading on topics arising from the management of the patients is an important component of the experience. Interested students should discuss their goals prior to the rotation. One student every two or four weeks. Director: J.E. Gage

IM 306, Allergy and Immunology Elective Students attend the Allergy & Immunology Clinic for adults at the Yale Allergy & Immunology Center in North Haven and the Allergy & Immunology Pediatric Clinic at Long Wharf. It is recommended that they attend Journal Club and the Allergy Seminar, and they may also join in the consultations with the Allergy & Immunology service at Yale-New Haven Hospital. Prerequisite: Immunobiology course. One or two students every two or four weeks. Director: F.S. Kantor

IM 312, Geriatric Medicine Elective The goals of this elective are (1) to understand care delivery in subacute care, long-term care, assisted living, and home care settings, including both the services available and the role of the physician in all of these settings; (2) to appreciate how goals of care can be met differently in these settings and appreciate the unique opportunity to avoid hospitalization that these settings afford; (3) to understand the role of geriatric syndromes in the quality of life of individuals in these settings and gain skill in approaching the multifactorial nature of the patient’s illness states; (4) to further skills through interface with the hospice and palliative care team and the geropsychiatry team; and (5) to appreciate the need for appropriate information transfer in transitions in care. The two-week rotation is an introduction to sites of care; the student spends two full days on home care, four full days in the nursing home setting doing both subacute admissions and monthly reviews of longer-term residents, two half-days in the consultation clinic, and two days in a setting tailored to the student’s interests. In the four-week rotation, the student is given a more graduated experience of responsibility. In the extended care setting, the student is assigned patients to follow once a week throughout the rotation, including new, complex subacute admissions and hospice patients. The student sees patients in their homes and in assisted living with a physician who is an attending in these settings. The student also spends one full day with the Agency on Aging and a half-day at an adult day care center. Prerequisites: Internal Medicine Clerkships I and II. One student every two or four weeks. Director: G.J. Kerins

IM 349, Spiritual Care in the Hospital Setting Elective The goals of this elective are to convey to the student an awareness of the options for spiritual care and support within an acute care hospital setting and to give the student an opportunity to learn and practice spiritual caregiving skills appropriate to the physician’s role. The Department of Religious Ministries has professionally certified chaplains of many faiths who serve as faculty and spiritual caregiving mentors. Students spend time with at least four different chaplains (of Jewish, Roman Catholic, Protestant, and Pentecostal backgrounds) to observe their chaplaincy practices and discuss with them the implications of both faith-specific and interfaith spiritual care. Students are also instructed in various spiritual assessment models and are invited to conduct a least four assessments (a self-assessment, a colleague assessment, and two patient assessments). In addition to shadowing individual chaplains, students attend departmental morning reports, staff meetings, and at least one Sunday worship service. Students prepare a brief essay at the end of the rotation, reflecting upon their experiences. One or two students every four weeks. Director: A.H. Fortin

IM 360, General Medicine Consult Elective The General Medicine Consult Team provides consultative services to all non-internal medicine services throughout Yale-New Haven Hospital and Yale-New Haven Psychiatric Hospital. The team, consisting of one attending physician and one PA or APRN, performs preoperative evaluations, offers general medicine consultation and co-management, and evaluates patients for possible transfer to the internal medicine service. Students are responsible for their own patients and, with supervision, perform independent evaluations of all types of consults. Daily didactic sessions are held. Prerequisite: Internal Medicine Clerkship. One student every two or four weeks. Director: V.A. Morris

IM 500, Methods of Clinical Research This composite course begins with an intensive set of summer classes during July and the first two weeks of August. The course resumes in September and continues throughout the remainder of the academic year, ending in early June. The overall curriculum integrates several distinct components. The summer term contains sessions on statistics, epidemiology, clinical and health services research methods, health economics, and community-based participatory research. The fall term contains more advance statistics and research methods, as well as several sessions on health policy, social and behavioral influences on health, and community-based research. The spring term contains remaining topics in research methods and several sessions on health management. Summer sessions are held four times a week (ten hours); fall sessions are held three times a week (six and one-half hours); spring sessions are held two times a week (five hours). Open only to postdoctoral students with clinical training; permission of course director required. Director: C.P. Gross

Yale-New Haven Hospital Saint Raphael Campus Electives

IM 326, Geriatric Medicine Elective This elective provides an opportunity to diagnose and manage geriatric syndromes in a variety of settings, including inpatient consultation service, outpatient geriatric assessment clinic, and nursing homes. Students work up and follow patients and participate in weekly team conferences. One student every two or four weeks. Codirectors: B.J. Wu, G.J. Kerins

IM 327, Critical Care Elective Senior students participate in critical care medicine activities in the medical intensive care unit (MICU). The emphasis is on evaluation and acute management of respiratory failure, shock, and sepsis, and on the use of invasive monitoring. The physiological basis of disease and the rationale for therapeutic interventions are also emphasized. One student every two or four weeks. Director: B.J. Wu; H. Knight, R. Elias, A. Uzunpinar, F. Lopez, T. Palvinskaya

IM 361, Internal Medicine Elective for M.D./Ph.D. Students The goal of this elective is to reinforce students’ clinical skills following their time away from clinical medicine. The emphasis is on history taking, physical examination skills, interpretation of data, morning presentations, medical terminology, patient communication, and coordination of care. Students are assigned to a team that consists of one intern, one resident, and one attending physician. Students admit their own patients and are responsible, with supervision, for the care of their patients during hospitalization. Students present daily on rounds; and history, physical diagnosis, and laboratory interpretation skills are emphasized. One student every two or four weeks. Director: B.J. Wu

Humanities in Medicine

The courses listed below are representative of those offered through the Program for Humanities in Medicine. Further information is available from Dr. Anna Reisman (anna.reisman@yale.edu).

Poetry and Medicine Hope, courage, devotion, anguish, pain, illness, and death—the substance of all great literature is also fundamental to medicine. Poetry and Medicine, a bimonthly seminar elective, introduces students to works of poetry, illuminating the ethical, moral, and psychological issues continually confronting their profession. The course helps students develop an understanding of the ways in which interpreting literature enhances their interactions with patients and clarifies some dimensions of their work. Course schedule: Bimonthly meetings at a mutually determined time.

Creative Writing This seminar is held biweekly throughout the academic year. Participants share and critique prose, poetry, and theater pieces.

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Investigative Medicine

2 Church Street South, Suite 406, 203.785.6842

http://medicine.yale.edu/investigativemedicine

Professors T.M. Gill (Medicine), J.R. Gruen (Pediatrics), H.M. Krumholz (Medicine), G. Tellides (Surgery), M.E. Tinetti (Medicine)

IMED 625a, Principles of Clinical Research The purpose of this intensive two-week course is to provide an overview of the objectives, research strategies, and methods of conducting patient-oriented clinical research. Topics include competing objectives of clinical research, principles of observational studies, principles of clinical trials, principles of meta-analysis, interpretation of diagnostic tests, prognostic studies, causal inference, qualitative research methods, and decision analysis. Sessions generally combine a lecture on the topic with discussion of articles that are distributed in advance of the sessions. Consent of instructor required. Two weeks, July 27–August 7, 2015. E.D. Shapiro

IMED 630a, Ethical Issues in Biomedical Research This termlong course addresses topics that are central to the conduct of biomedical research, including the ethics of clinical investigation, conflicts of interest, misconduct in research, data acquisition, and protection of research subjects. Practical sessions cover topics such as collaborations with industry, publication and peer review, responsible authorship, and mentoring relationships. Satisfactory completion of this course fulfills the NIH requirement for training in Responsible Conduct of Research. Format consists of lecture presentation followed by discussion. Consent of instructor required. J.E. Craft

IMED 635a or b, Directed Reading in Investigative Medicine An independent study course for first-year students in the Investigative Medicine program. Topics are chosen by the student, and reading lists are provided by faculty for weekly meetings to discuss articles. Four sessions are required; dates/times by arrangement. Consent of instructor required. J.E. Craft

IMED 645a, Introduction to Biostatistics in Clinical Investigation The course provides an introduction to statistical concepts and techniques commonly encountered in medical research. Previous course work in statistics or experience with statistical packages is not a requirement. Topics to be discussed include study design, probability, comparing sample means and proportions, survival analysis, and sample size/power calculations. The computer lab incorporates lecture content into practical application by introducing the statistical software package SPSS to describe and analyze data. Consent of instructor required. Two weeks, July 13–24, 2015. E.D. Shapiro

IMED 655b, Writing Your First Big Grant Proposal In this termlong course, students gain intensive, practical experience in evaluating and preparing grant proposals, including introduction to NIH study section format. The course gives new clinical investigators the essential tools to design and to initiate their own proposals for obtaining grants to do research and to develop their own careers. The course is limited to students who plan to submit grant proposals (usually for a K-type mentored career development award, but also for R-type awards). Attendance and active participation are required. Consent of instructor required. E.D. Shapiro

IMED 680b, Topics in Human Investigation The course teaches students about the process through which novel therapeutics are designed, clinically tested, and approved for human use. It is divided into two main components, with the first devoted to moving a chemical agent from the bench to the clinic, and the second to outlining the objectives and methods of conducting clinical trials according to the FDA approval process. The first component describes aspects of structure-based drug design and offers insight into how the drug discovery process is conducted in the pharmaceutical industry. The format includes background lectures with discussions, labs, and computer tutorials. The background lectures include a historical perspective on drug discovery, the current paradigm, and important considerations for future success. The second component of the course provides students with knowledge of the basic tools of clinical investigation and how new drugs are tested in humans. A series of lectures and discussions provides an overview of the objectives, research strategies, and methods of conducting patient-oriented research, with a focus on design of trials to test therapeutics. Each student is required to participate (as an observer) in an HIC review, in addition to active participation in class. Consent of instructor required. J.E. Craft, K.S. Anderson

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Laboratory Medicine

PS 210, 203.688.2286

http://medicine.yale.edu/labmed

Professors A. Baumgarten (Emeritus), J.R. Bove (Emeritus), Y. Choi (Pathology), R.K. Donabedian (Emeritus), S.C. Edberg (Emeritus), S.D. Hudnall (Pathology), P.I. Jatlow (Emeritus), P.B. Kavathas, D.S. Krause, M. Landry, P. McPhedran (Emeritus), H.M. Rinder, M.R. Seashore (Genetics), M.J. Shlomchik (Adjunct), J.L. Sklar (Pathology), B.R. Smith (Chair), E.L. Snyder, G.E. Stack, P.J. Tattersall

Associate Professors S.M. Campbell, S. Chang, J. Hendrickson, J.G. Howe, P.W. Marks (Medicine), Y. Wu (Adjunct)

Assistant Professors T. Eid, S.C. Eisenbarth, J.M. El-Khoury, A.M. Haberman, M.J. Levene (Adjunct), T.S. Murray (Adjunct), D.R. Peaper, C.A. Tormey, R. Torres, M.L. Xu (Pathology)

Instructors S. Fink, E.F. Foxman, R. Harb, R.G. Hauser, A. Siddon (Pathology)

Senior Research Scientists S.F. Cotmore, P.I. Jatlow

Associate Research Scientists A. Bersenev, L. Devine, R. Dhaher, P. Gu, L. Li, I.S. Mihaylov, E.M. Olson, R. Rai, Y. Wang, P. Zhang

Clinical Professors B.P. Griffith (Retired), R.A. Levine, S.C. Wardlaw

Associate Clinical Professors P.N. Fiedler (Pathology), M.E. Hodsdon, D.R. Mayo

Assistant Clinical Professors J. Breen (Medicine), W.G. Frederick, I.V. Kaplan, H. Sanchez, N. Shafi, K.D. Smith, M. Velleca

Clinical Instructor B.R. Spencer

Lecturers D.J. Barchi, S.A. Cohen, D. Ferguson, P.E. Marone, R.L. Ross

LMED 123a, Medical Microbiology This course focuses on both basic microbial pathophysiology and medical microbiology. The course is divided into four sections, consisting of microbial physiology and genetics, bacteriology and mycology, virology, and parasitology. Microbial pathogenesis is taught as it relates to human infectious disease on the cellular and molecular levels. The unique structures, lifestyles, and roles in producing disease of medically important microbes are taught in lecture, laboratory, and small group settings. Laboratory sessions employ a case-based approach to teach the effective use of laboratory testing in the diagnosis and management of infectious diseases. Microscopy, culture and biochemical, immunological, and molecular techniques are demonstrated and discussed, and simple tests such as Gram stain and rapid antigen tests are performed. Problem-based learning sessions in clinical infectious disease are offered in the last half of the course to provide a bridge from the science of the microbe to the management of infected patients. Second-year course. S.M. Campbell, M. Landry, D.R. Peaper

LMED 131, Laboratory Medicine Clinical Elective This elective offers rotations through the clinical laboratories, including Blood Bank, Therapeutic Apheresis, Clinical Chemistry, Toxicology, Hematology and Coagulation, Flow Cytometry, Immunology, Molecular Diagnostics, Microbiology, and Virology. Students work closely with residents, fellows, attending physicians, and laboratory staff; work up clinical cases under supervision; and attend morning report, case conference, journal club, clinical rounds, and didactic sessions. Students also have the opportunity to work with the resident on call for at least one weekend day during the elective. Students can rotate through all laboratories or focus on specific laboratories of interest. The goals of the elective are to learn appropriate usage and interpretation of laboratory tests, and to gain a better understanding of the theoretical and clinical underpinnings of laboratory medicine. This elective is appropriate for students considering a career in laboratory medicine or combined laboratory medicine and pathology, but also for all students who will use clinical laboratory testing in their careers. One or two students every two or four weeks. Director: M. Landry

LMED 619/PATH 619, Anatomic Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Combined Elective The goals for anatomic pathology are to understand the basic principles of diagnostic anatomic pathology and its role in clinical medicine. The goals for laboratory medicine are to learn appropriate usage and interpretation of laboratory tests and to gain a better understanding of the theoretical, technological, and clinical underpinnings of laboratory medicine. This elective is appropriate for students considering a career in laboratory medicine and/or pathology, and for all students who will use laboratory and pathology tests in their careers. One or two students every four weeks. Directors: A. Adeniran, M. Landry

Laboratory Medicine Teaching Sessions The purpose of the Laboratory Medicine Teaching Sessions is to introduce second- and third-year students on their clinical rotations to basic concepts of laboratory diagnosis. On the first afternoon of their Medicine-Neurology rotations at Yale-New Haven Hospital, students visit four laboratories: Blood Bank, Hematology, Chemistry, and Microbiology/Virology. In each laboratory the faculty use clinical cases together with relevant slides, culture plates, or other test data to illustrate the use and interpretation, as well as pitfalls, of laboratory tests. These teaching sessions should also serve to encourage and facilitate communication with the laboratories after the students return to the wards. M. Landry and associates

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Microbial Pathogenesis

BCMM 336E, 203.737.2404

http://medicine.yale.edu/micropath

Professors M. Cappello (Pediatrics), E. Fikrig (Medicine), J.E. Galán (Chair), E. Groisman, C. Jacobs-Wagner (Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology), C.R. Roy

Associate Professors C. Ben Mamoun (Medicine), A. Goodman, B.I. Kazmierczak (Medicine), B.D. Lindenbach, J.D. MacMicking, W.H. Mothes, R. Sutton (Medicine)

Assistant Professors J.M. Crawford (Chemistry), P. Kumar (Medicine)

Associate Research Scientists C.C. Butan, D.C. Desrosiers, S. Hannemann, J. Kato, B. Kim, M.D. Lara-Tejero, M.D. Lefebre, J.A. McDonough, J. Ndjomou, H.N. Ramanathan, F.X. Sewald, P.D. Uchil

The following courses in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences are open to medical students with permission of the DGS.

MBIO 547b/EMD 547b, Vaccines: Concepts in Biology Vaccines are one of the major public health preventive approaches for disease control. However, the underlying biological mechanisms are still being explored, with the purpose of designing better and more efficacious vaccines. Vaccine-preventable diseases now include many infectious diseases as well as cancer. This course briefly reviews the immunological basis of immunity to infection and disease. Topics then include the basic science underlying vaccine development, current vaccine-preventable diseases, as well as vaccines under development. D. McMahon-Pratt

MBIO 670, 671, 672, Laboratory Rotations Rotation in three laboratories. Required of all first-year graduate students. W.H. Mothes

MBIO 680a/EMD 680a, Advanced Topics in Tropical Parasitic Diseases An introductory topic-based course in modern parasitology. For each topic there is an introductory lecture followed by a journal club-like discussion session of relevant papers selected from the literature. The course provides an introduction to basic biological concepts of parasitic eukaryotes causing diseases in humans. Topics include strategies used by parasitic eukaryotes to establish infections in the host and approaches to disease control, through either chemotherapy, vaccines, or genomics. In addition, emphasis is placed on evaluating the quality and limitation of scientific publications and developing skills in scientific communication. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. D. McMahon-Pratt

MBIO 685b, Molecular Mechanisms of Microbial Pathogenesis This interdisciplinary course focuses on current topics related to host-pathogen interactions. Each week a lecture is given on the topic, followed by student presentations of seminal papers in the field. All participants are required to present a paper. J.D. MacMicking

MBIO 686a, Bacterial Determinants of Pathogenesis The course provides an introduction to basic principles in bacterial pathogenesis. Topics focus on the bacterial determinants mediating infection and pathogenesis, as well as strategies to prevent and treat diseases. Each week a lecture is given on the topic, followed by student presentations of seminal papers in the field. All participants are required to present a paper. E. Groisman

MBIO 701a,b, Research in Progress All students, beginning in their third year, are required to present their research once a year at the Graduate Student Research in Progress. These presentations are intended to give each student practice in presenting his or her own work before a sympathetic but critical audience and to familiarize the faculty with the research. W.H. Mothes

MBIO 702a,b, Microbiology Seminar Series All students are required to attend all Microbiology seminars scheduled throughout the academic year. Microbiologists from around the world are invited to describe their research. W.H. Mothes

MBIO 734a/GENE 734a/MB&B 734a, Molecular Biology of Animal Viruses Lecture course with emphasis on mechanisms of viral replication, oncogenic transformation, and virus-host cell interactions. B.D. Lindenbach

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Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry

JWG 301, 203.432.5662; SHM C106, 203.785.4595

http://medicine.yale.edu/mbb

Professors K.S. Anderson (Pharmacology), S.J. Baserga, R.R. Breaker (Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology), G.W. Brudvig (Chemistry), E.M. De La Cruz, D.C. DiMaio (Genetics), D.M. Engelman, A. Garen, M.B. Gerstein, N.D. Grindley (Emeritus), M.W. Hochstrasser, J. Howard, A.J. Koleske, W.H. Konigsberg, P. Lengyel (Emeritus), J. Loria (Chemistry), I.G. Miller (Pediatrics), A.D. Miranker, K. Neugebauer, T.D. Pollard (Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology), L.J. Regan, D.G. Schatz (Immunobiology), R.G. Shulman (Emeritus), D.G. Söll, M.J. Solomon, J.A. Steitz, T.A. Steitz, S.A. Strobel, W.C. Summers (Therapeutic Radiology), P. Sung (Chair), S.L. Wolin (Cell Biology)

Professor Adjunct of Research K.R. Williams

Associate Professors M.R. Koelle, A.E. Rhoades, H. Wang (Adjunct), C.J. Wilson (Engineering & Applied Science), Y. Xiong

Assistant Professors R. Baxter (Chemistry), J. Berro, D.S. Greenbaum (Adjunct), C. Schlieker, M. Simon, C.V. Sindelar, S. Takyar (Medicine)

Senior Research Scientists N.D. Grindley, C.M. Joyce

Research Scientists J.L. Burton, E.J. Folta-Stogniew, Y. Kong, J.S. Rozowsky, K. Tycowski, J. Wang

Associate Research Scientists A. Alexandrov, W. Cao, T. Christian, J. Daley, M. Englert, C. Fan, J. Graham, L. Guo, D.A. Hiller, X. Jia, Y. Kwon, T.T. Lam, F. Liang, J. Lin, B. Liu, I. Lomakin, S. Longerich, D. Ostapenko, R. Park, Y. Polikanov, A. Sethi, K.J. Smith, G. Wang, X. Xue, K. Yan, W. Zhao, Y. Zuo

Lecturers A.A. Belperron (Medicine), A.B. Pawashe, M.P. Strout (Medicine), E.C. Thrower (Medicine), C.A. Tormey (Laboratory Medicine), J.M. Ueland, J.S. Weinstein

MB&B 500bu/MCDB 500bu, Biochemistry An introduction to the biochemistry of animals, plants, and microorganisms, emphasizing the relations of chemical principles and structure to the evolution and regulation of living systems. R.R. Breaker, N. Clay

MB&B 517b3/ENAS 517b/MCDB 517b3/PHYS 517b3, Methods and Logic in Interdisciplinary Research This half-term PEB class is intended to introduce students to integrated approaches to research. Each week, the first of two sessions is student-led, while the second session is led by faculty with complementary expertise and discusses papers that use different approaches to the same topic (for example, physical and biological or experiment and theory). Counts as 0.5 credit toward MB&B graduate course requirements. Required of students in PEB. L.J. Regan, J. Berro, E.M. De La Cruz, E. Dufresne, T. Emonet, P. Forscher, J. Howard, M. King, S. Mochrie, C. O’Hern, T.D. Pollard, Y. Zhang, and staff

MB&B 520a1, Boot Camp Biology An intensive introduction to biological nomenclature, systems, processes, and techniques for graduate students with previous backgrounds in non-biological fields including physics, engineering, and computer science who wish to perform graduate research in the biological sciences. Counts as 0.5 credit toward MB&B graduate course requirements. Required of students in PEB. L.J. Regan and staff

MB&B 523b/ENAS 541b/PHYS 523b, Biological Physics An introduction to the physics of several important biological phenomena including transport in the cell cytoplasm, protein folding, DNA packaging, and thermodynamics of protein binding and aggregation. The material and approach are positioned at the interface of the physical and biological sciences, and involve significant computation. This course teaches the basics of computer programming necessary for quantitative studies of biological systems. We start with the foundations of programming in MATLAB. During the course, students perform sophisticated data analyses, view and analyze protein structures, and perform Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. No prior programming experience is needed. Required of students in PEB. C. O’Hern

MB&B 550a, Molecular Foundations of Medicine This course is part of the Molecules to Systems course, which is open only to first-year medical students. An introduction to the major concepts of biochemistry and molecular biology, with emphasis on the human body. Special attention is devoted to how recent advances in basic science contribute to our understanding and treatment of human disease. S.J. Baserga, M.J. Solomon, and staff

MB&B 562aU/CB&B 562a/ENAS 561a/MCDB 562aU/PHYS 562a, Dynamical Systems in Biology This course covers advanced topics in computational biology. How do cells compute, how do they count and tell time, how do they oscillate and generate spatial patterns? Topics include time-dependent dynamics in regulatory, signal-transduction, and neuronal networks; fluctuations, growth, and form; mechanics of cell shape and motion; spatially heterogeneous processes; diffusion. Prerequisite: MCDB 561b or equivalent, or a 200-level biology course, or permission of the instructor. D. Clark, J. Howard

MB&B 591b/ENAS 991b/MCDB 591b/PHYS 991b, Integrated Workshop This required course for students in PEB involves hands-on laboratory modules with students working in pairs. A biology student is paired with a physics or engineering student; a computation/theory student is paired with an experimental student. The modules are devised so that a range of skills is acquired, and students learn from each other. Modules are hosted in faculty laboratories. Receives no course credit toward MB&B graduate course requirements. With permission of the DGS, can be used by PEB students to replace the third rotation of MB&B 650b but will receive no separate course credit toward MB&B course requirements. L.J. Regan, J. Bewersdorf, S.G. Campbell, K. Miller-Jensen, S. Mochrie, C. O’Hern

MB&B 600au, Principles of Biochemistry I Discussion of the physical, structural, and functional properties of proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates, three major classes of molecules in living organisms. Energy metabolism, hormone signaling, and muscle contraction as examples of complex biological processes whose underlying mechanisms can be understood by identifying and analyzing the molecules responsible for these phenomena. M.R. Koelle, M. Simon

MB&B 601bu, Principles of Biochemistry II A continuation of MB&B 600a that considers the chemistry and metabolism of nucleic acids, the mechanism and regulation of protein and nucleic acid synthesis, and selected topics in macromolecular biochemistry. C. Schlieker, K. Neugebauer

MB&B 602a/CBIO 602a/MCDB 602a, Molecular Cell Biology A comprehensive introduction to the molecular and mechanistic aspects of cell biology for graduate students in all programs. Emphasizes fundamental issues of cellular organization, regulation, biogenesis, and function at the molecular level. S.L. Wolin, M.J. Caplan, T. Carroll, C. Crews, P. De Camilli, M. King, T. Melia, I.-H. Park, J.E. Rothman, M.A. Schwartz

MB&B 625au/GENE 625a/MCDB 625au, Basic Concepts of Genetic Analysis The universal principles of genetic analysis in eukaryotes are discussed in lectures. Students also read a small selection of primary papers illustrating the very best of genetic analysis and dissect them in detail in the discussion sections. While other Yale graduate molecular genetics courses emphasize molecular biology, this course focuses on the concepts and logic underlying modern genetic analysis. T. Xu and staff

MB&B 630b/MCDB 630b, Biochemical and Biophysical Approaches in Molecular and Cellular Biology This graduate course introduces the theory and application of biochemical and bio­physical methods to study the structure and function of biological macromolecules. The course considers the basic physical chemistry required in cellular and molecular biology but does not require a previous course in physical chemistry. One class per week is a lecture introducing a topic. The second class is a discussion of one or two research papers utilizing those methods. Does not count for graduate course credit for BBSB graduate students. T.D. Pollard and staff

MB&B 635au/ENAS 518a, Mathematical Methods in Biophysics Applied mathematical methods relevant to analysis and interpretation of biophysical and biochemical data are covered. Students apply these methods (statistics and error analysis, differential equations, linear algebra, and Fourier transforms) to analyze data from research groups in MB&B. Prerequisites: MATH 120 (or equivalent) and MB&B 600a (or equivalent), or permission of the instructors. Y. Xiong, J. Berro

MB&B 650, Lab Rotation for First-Year Students Required of all first-year BBSB graduate students. Credit for full year only.

MB&B 675a, Seminar for First-Year Students Required of all first-year BBSB graduate students. K. Neugebauer, Y. Xiong

MB&B 676b, Responsible Conduct of Research Designed for students who are beginning to do scientific research. The course seeks to describe some of the basic features of life in contemporary research and some of the personal and professional issues that researchers encounter in their work. Approximately six sessions, run in a seminar/discussion format. Required of all first-year BBSB graduate students. S.J. Baserga and staff

MB&B 710b4/C&MP 710b, Electron Cryo-Microscopy for Protein Structure Determination Understanding cellular function requires structural and biochemical studies at an ever-increasing level of complexity. The course is an introduction to the concepts and applications of high-resolution electron cryo-microscopy. This rapidly emerging new technique is the only method that allows biological macromolecules to be studied at all levels of resolution from cellular organization to near atomic detail. Counts as 0.5 credit toward MB&B graduate course requirements. F.J. Sigworth, C.V. Sindelar

[MB&B 715b/ENAS 705b/PHYS 705b, Numerical Simulations of Liquids Not offered in 2015–2016]

MB&B 720au, Macromolecular Structure and Biophysical Analysis An in-depth analysis of macromolecular structure and its elucidation using modern methods of structural biology and biochemistry. Topics include architectural arrangements of proteins, RNA, and DNA; practical methods in structural analysis; and an introduction to diffraction and NMR. Prerequisites: physical chemistry (may be taken concurrently) and biochemistry. A.D. Miranker, J. Howard, Y. Xiong

[MB&B 722b3, Optical Spectroscopy of Biomolecules Not offered in 2015–2016]

MB&B 723a2, Macromolecular Interactions: Atoms to Networks The course examines the nature of the intricate networks of macromolecular interactions that underlie the functioning of every cell and the modern biophysical methods available for their study across multiple length, time, and energy scales. Counts as 0.5 credit toward MB&B graduate course requirements. L.J. Regan

MB&B 730a, Methods and Logic in Molecular Biology The course examines fundamental concepts in molecular biology through intense critical analysis of the primary literature. The objective is to develop primary literature reading and critical thinking skills. Required of and open only to first-year graduate students in BBSB. M. Simon, A.J. Koleske, C. Schlieker

MB&B 734a/GENE 734a/MBIO 734a, Molecular Biology of Animal Viruses Lecture course with emphasis on mechanisms of viral replication, oncogenic transformation, and virus-host cell interactions. B.D. Lindenbach

MB&B 743bu/GENE 743b/MCDB 743b, Advanced Eukaryotic Molecular Biology Selected topics in transcriptional control, regulation of chromatin structure, mRNA processing, mRNA stability, RNA interference, translation, protein degradation, DNA replication, DNA repair, site-specific DNA recombination, somatic hypermutation. Prerequisite: biochemistry or permission of the instructor. M.W. Hochstrasser, K. Neugebauer, M. Simon, P. Sung

MB&B 749au/GENE 749a, Medical Impact of Basic Science Consideration of examples of recent discoveries in basic science that have elucidated the molecular origins of disease or that have suggested new therapies for disease. Emphasis is placed on the fundamental principles on which these advances rely. Reading is from the primary scientific and medical literature, with emphasis on developing the ability to read this literature critically. Aimed primarily at undergraduates. Prerequisite: biochemistry or permission of the instructor. May not be taken by MB&B B.S./MS. students for graduate course credit. J.A. Steitz, I.G. Miller, A.D. Miranker, K. Neugebauer, D.G. Schatz, T.A. Steitz, and staff

MB&B 750a2, Biological Membranes Biological membranes and their resident proteins are essential for cellular function; yet comparatively little is known about their structure and dynamics. This class provides an introduction to the biochemistry and biophysics of lipids, lipid bilayers, and lipid-derived second messengers. In addition, structural as well as functional aspects of the different classes of membrane proteins are discussed along with an outline of experimental approaches used to achieve an understanding of membrane protein structure and function at a molecular level. Counts as 0.5 credit toward MB&B graduate course requirements. Prerequisite: biochemistry. D.M. Engelman

MB&B 752bu/CB&B 752b/CPSC 752bu/MCDB 752bu, Bioinformatics: Practical Application of Simulation and Data Mining Bioinformatics encompasses the analysis of gene sequences, macromolecular structures, and functional genomics data on a large scale. It represents a major practical application for modern techniques in data mining and simulation. Specific topics to be covered include sequence alignment, large-scale processing, next-generation sequencing data, comparative genomics, phylogenetics, biological database design, geometric analysis of protein structure, molecular-dynamics simulation, biological networks, normalization of microarray data, mining of functional genomics data sets, and machine-learning approaches to data integration. Prerequisites: biochemistry and calculus, or permission of the instructor. M.B. Gerstein

MB&B 753b3, Bioinformatics: Practical Application of Data Mining Bioinformatics encompasses the analysis of gene sequences, macromolecular structures, and functional genomics data on a large scale. It represents a major practical application for modern techniques in data mining and simulation. This module focuses on the first of these techniques, data mining. Specific topics to be covered include sequence alignments, comparative genomics and phylogenetics, biological databases, microarray normalization, and machine-learning approaches to data integration. Counts as 0.5 credit toward MB&B graduate course requirements. Prerequisites: biochemistry and calculus, or permission of the instructor. M.B. Gerstein

MB&B 754b4, Bioinformatics: Practical Application of Simulation Bioinformatics encompasses the analysis of gene sequences, macromolecular structures, and functional genomics data on a large scale. It represents a major practical application for modern techniques in data mining and simulation. This module focuses on the second of these techniques, simulation. Specific topics to be covered include geometric analysis of protein structure, molecular-dynamics simulation, and biological networks. Counts as 0.5 credit toward MB&B graduate course requirements. Prerequisites: biochemistry and calculus, or permission of the instructor. M.B. Gerstein

MB&B 760a2, Principles of Macromolecular Crystallography Rigorous introduction to the principles of macromolecular crystallography, aimed at students who are planning to carry out structural studies involving X-ray crystallography or who want to obtain in-depth knowledge for critical analysis of published crystal structures. Counts as 0.5 credit toward MB&B graduate course requirements. Prerequisites: physical chemistry and biochemistry. T.A. Steitz, Y. Xiong

[MB&B 761b4, X-ray Crystallography Workshop Not offered in 2015–2016]

MB&B 800a, Advanced Topics in Molecular Medicine The seminar, which covers topics in the molecular mechanisms of disease, illustrates timely issues in areas such as protein chemistry and enzymology, intermediary metabolism, nucleic acid biochemistry, gene expression, and virology. M.D. and M.D./Ph.D. students only. Prerequisite: biochemistry (may be taken concurrently). S.J. Baserga, W.H. Konigsberg, and staff

MB&B 900a or 901b, Reading Course in Biophysics Directed reading course in biophysics. Term paper required. By arrangement with faculty. Open only to graduate students in MB&B. Please see syllabus for additional requirements.

MB&B 902a or 903b, Reading Course in Molecular Genetics Directed reading course in molecular genetics. Term paper required. By arrangement with faculty. Open only to graduate students in MB&B. Please see syllabus for additional requirements.

MB&B 904a or 905b, Reading Course in Biochemistry Directed reading course in biochemistry. Term paper required. By arrangement with faculty. Open only to graduate students in MB&B. Please see syllabus for additional requirements.

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Neurobiology

SHM C303, 203.785.4323

http://medicine.yale.edu/neurobiology

Professors A.F. Arnsten, H. Blumenfeld (Neurology), M.M. Chun (Psychology), M.C. Crair, N. Daw (Ophthalmology & Visual Science), P. De Camilli (Cell Biology), N.C. DeLanerolle (Neurosurgery), S. Diano (Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences), R.S. Duman (Psychiatry), J.E. Gelernter (Psychiatry), C.A. Greer (Neurosurgery), M. Gunel (Neurosurgery), J. Hirsch (Psychiatry), T.L. Horvath (Comparative Medicine), J.D. Kocsis (Neurology), A.J. Koleske (Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry), J.H. Krystal (Psychiatry), R.H. LaMotte (Anesthesiology), D. Lee, C. Leranth (Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences), P.J. Lombroso (Child Study Center), D.A. McCormick, G.D. Pearlson (Psychiatry), M. Picciotto (Psychiatry), V.A. Pieribone (Cellular & Molecular Physiology), M.N. Potenza (Psychiatry), P. Rakic (Chair), J. Santos-Sacchi (Surgery), I.R. Schwartz (Surgery), N. Sestan, G.M. Shepherd, R. Sinha (Psychiatry), S.M. Strittmatter (Neurology), F.M. Vaccarino (Child Study Center), C.H. Van Dyck (Psychiatry), S.G. Waxman (Neurology), Z. Zhou (Ophthalmology & Visual Science)

Associate Professors M. Alreja (Psychiatry), C.J. Bruce, K.P. Cosgrove (Psychiatry), R.J. DiLeone (Psychiatry), J. Grutzendler (Neurology), E.A. Jonas (Medicine), C. Li (Psychiatry), A. Louvi (Neurosurgery), J.A. Mazer, D.S. Navaratnam (Neurology), M.L. Schwartz, J.V. Verhagen

Assistant Professors J.A. Cardin, S.C. Chang (Psychology), B. Chen (Ophthalmology & Visual Science), M.O. Dietrich (Comparative Medicine), G. Dragoi (Psychiatry), J.L. Gerrard (Neurosurgery), M.J. Higley, I. Kim (Ophthalmology & Visual Science), C.A. Kwan (Psychiatry), I. Levy (Comparative Medicine)

Senior Research Scientists N. Carnevale, M. Hines

Research Scientists A.E. Ayoub, A. Duque, C.D. Paspalas, L.D. Selemon, M. Wang

Associate Research Scientists J.I. Arellano, Y. Bao, C. Chiu, S. Hayashi, H. Komuro, M. Li, L.N. Marenco, Y. Morozov, T.M. Morse, M. Onorati, S. Pochareddy, B.G. Rash, H. Seo, M. Shibata, M. Skarica, H. Xu, X. Xu

NBIO 500b/NSCI 510b, Structural and Functional Organization of the Human Nervous System An integrative overview of the structure and function of the human brain as it pertains to major neurological and psychiatric disorders. Neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and clinical correlations are interrelated to provide essential background in the neurosciences. Lectures in neurocytology and neuroanatomy survey neuronal organization in the human brain, with emphasis on long fiber tracts related to clinical neurology. Weekly three-hour laboratory sessions in close collaboration with faculty members. Lectures in neurophysiology cover various aspects of neural function at the cellular level, with a strong emphasis on the mammalian nervous system. Clinical correlations consist of five sessions given by one or two faculty members representing both basic and clinical sciences. These sessions relate neurological symptoms to cellular processes in various diseases of the brain. Variable class schedule; contact course instructors. This course is offered to graduate and M.D./Ph.D. students only and cannot be audited. M.L. Schwartz, P. Rakic, and staff

NBIO 501a/NSCI 501a, Principles of Neuroscience General neuroscience seminar: lectures, readings, and discussion of selected topics in neuroscience. Emphasis is on how approaches at the molecular, cellular, physiological, and organismal levels can lead to understanding of neuronal and brain function. R.J. DiLeone, A. Louvi

[NBIO 504b/MCDB 735bU/NSCI 504b, Seminar in Brain Development and Plasticity Not offered in 2015–2016]

NBIO 507b/NSCI 507b, Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Neurological Disease The course focuses on those diseases (Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, ALS, and other neurodegenerative diseases, triplet repeat induced diseases, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, etc.) in which modern neuroscience has advanced mechanistic explanations for clinical conditions. It highlights recent molecular, electrophysiological, and imaging experiments in parsing disease mechanisms. The application of pathophysiologic understanding to therapeutics is considered. S.S. Chandra, W.B. Cafferty

NBIO 510a, Introduction to Methods in Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology Independent study providing firsthand insight into various techniques and approaches used in neuroscience. Light microscopic techniques include various metallic impregnation methods, autoradiography, anterograde and retrograde axonal transport methods, hybridoma and recombined DNA technology, deoxyglucose metabolic method, fluorescent and immunocytochemical methods. Electron microscopy encompasses transmission, electronmicroscopic auto­radiography, and immuno-peroxidase methodology. Choice of techniques and hours to be arranged with individual faculty or staff members of the Department of Neurobiology.

NBIO 511, Introduction to Techniques Used in Electrophysiological Analysis at the Cellular Level Independent study providing practical training in in vivo and in vitro nervous system preparations, extracellular and intracellular recordings, sensory stimulation, dye injections, and selected neuropharmacological procedures. Choice of techniques and hours to be arranged with individual faculty of the Department of Neurobiology.

NBIO 512a/b/NSCI 512a/b, Lab Rotation for First-Year Students Required of all first-year Neurobiology and Neuroscience graduate students. Rotation period is one term. Both terms required. Grading is Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. C.A. Greer

NBIO 513a/b, Second-Year Thesis Research Required of all second-year Neurobiology graduate students. Both terms required. Grading is Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. M.C. Crair

[NBIO 532a/NSCI 532a, Neurobiology of Cortical Systems Not offered in 2015–2016]

[NBIO 535b/NSCI 535b, History of Modern Neuroscience Not offered in 2015–2016]

NBIO 540b/NSCI 540b, How to Give a Talk This course is a practical introduction to the art and science of giving a data-based seminar. The ability to give a clear, convincing, and engaging talk about your work is one of the key career skills of successful scientists. Content, visual presentation, body language, and delivery all combine to determine your impact on your audience. The focus in class is on student presentation skills and detailed feedback, interspersed with short example talks by invited guests from Yale and other institutions. Students give at least two talks over the course of the term and participate in weekly Q&A and feedback. Grading is based on class participation. Enrollment limited to ten. J.A. Cardin

NBIO 570b/C&MP 570b, Sensory Physiology The course provides an overview of the mammalian special sensory systems, including molecular and cellular bases of vision, audition, taste, olfaction, and somatosensation. Faculty with focus in those areas lead presentations and discussions on peripheral and central mechanisms. Psychophysical aspects of sensation are introduced. D. Zenisek, J. Santos-Sacchi, Z. Zhou

NBIO 580b/NSCI 580b, Bioethics in Neuroscience This course is an introduction to ethics and ethical decision making in the neurosciences. Format for the course is an informal discussion. Each week we are joined by members of the Yale faculty and community who can share their experiences and expertise as it relates to the topic of the week. This course is mandatory for first-year graduate students in the Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program (INP). Grading is Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory and is based on attendance/participation, weekly reaction papers, and a final term paper. The successful (Satisfactory) completion of this course is worth one full graduate course credit. C.A. Greer

NBIO 590a, Sensory Neuroethology: Bats and Owls, Electric Fish, and Beyond In this course we review the neurophysiology of sensory processing with particular attention to animal behavior (ethology) and computation. We begin with the classic neuroethology literature and end with current work on neocortical circuits underlying sensory processing in higher vertebrates. This seminar course meets once per week to read and discuss (mostly) primary research papers selected and presented by the students. J.A. Mazer

[NBIO 595a/NSCI 595a, Seminar in Visuomotor Neurophysiology Not offered in 2015–2016]

[NBIO 596a/NSCI 596a, Seminar in Neurophysiology of Decision Making Not offered in 2015–2016]

[NBIO 597b/NSCI 597b, Neuroeconomics Offered every other year. Not offered in 2015–2016]

NBIO 602a/b, Topics in Cortical Development and Evolution This advanced tutorial course involves extensive reading, discussion, and pilot experiments on the topic. P. Rakic

NBIO 610b/C&MP 620b, Fundamentals in Neurophysiology The course is designed for students who wish to gain a theoretical and practical knowledge of modern neurophysiology. Graduate students specializing in neurophysiology and non-neurophysiology are encouraged to attend, as the course begins at a very basic level and progresses to more complicated topics. Topics include properties of ion channels, firing properties of neurons, synaptic transmission, and neurophysiology methodology. V.A. Pieribone, F.J. Sigworth

NBIO 720a/MCDB 720au/NSCI 720a, Neurobiology Examination of the excitability of the nerve cell membrane as a starting point for the study of molecular, cellular, and intracellular mechanisms underlying the generation and control of behavior. H. Keshishian, P. Forscher

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Neurology

LCI 910, 203.737.1860

http://medicine.yale.edu/neurology

Professors T. Allison (Emeritus), H. Blumenfeld, J. Booss (Emeritus), M.B. Bracken (Epidemiology), H. Feldman (Adjunct), W.D. Graf (Pediatrics), D.M. Greer, D. Hafler (Chair), L.J. Hirsch, B. Jabbari, R.D. Kerns (Psychiatry), J.D. Kocsis, E.D. Louis, R.H. Mattson (Emeritus), L.R. Ment (Pediatrics), G. Miller (Pediatrics), D. Pelletier (Adjunct), J.W. Prichard (Emeritus), P. Rakic (Neurobiology), B.A. Shaywitz (Pediatrics), S.M. Strittmatter, C.H. Van Dyck (Psychiatry), S.G. Waxman

Associate Professors J.M. Baehring (Medicine), S.S. Chandra, R.B. Duckrow, J. Grutzendler, D.S. Navaratnam, H.S. Patwa, O.A. Petroff, K.N. Sheth, S. Spudich, J. Thomas

Assistant Professors M. Alkawadri, H. Amin, C.J. Azevedo, M.A. Bailey, K.P. Becker, C.F. Benjamin, L.A. Beslow (Pediatrics), F.C. Brown, G. Buchanan (Adjunct), W.B. Cafferty, C. Cotsapas, J.L. Dearborn, K. Detyniecki, D.B. DiCapua, M. Dominguez-Villar, P. Farooque, N. Gaspard (Adjunct), S. Ghosh, E.J. Gilmore, H. Hamid, O. Honmou (Adjunct), D.Y. Hwang, C. Juchem (Diagnostic Radiology), B. Keung, B. Khokhar, B.B. Koo, C. Loomis, D.G. Machado, N. Makhani (Pediatrics), E.G. Marcolini (Emergency Medicine), A.L. Meyer, J.J. Moeller, S. Novella, R. Nowak, K.C. O’Connor, N.H. Petersen, D. Pitt, N. Rampal, D. Richardson, K.R. Robeson-Gewuerz, L. Sansing, J. Schindler, E.S. Sharp, J.J. Sico, H. Tokuno, D.C. Volpe, J. Yoo (Adjunct)

Instructors D. Kuruvilla, I.H. Quraishi, A. Salardini

Senior Research Scientists S.D. Dib-Hajj, R.H. Mattson

Research Scientists J. Bai, J.A. Black

Associate Research Scientists Y. Ai, E.J. Arroyo, Y. Cao, B. Dash, N.R. Driesen (Psychiatry), M. Estacion, E.C. Gunther, C. Han, H. Harshvardhan, N.C. Hernandez, J. Hyun, T. Kang, I. Kim, K. Lankford, J. Park, G.D. Ponath, K. Raddassi, Y. Sekine, D. Sizova, A.M. Szekely (Genetics), H. Takahashi, A. Tan, K.J. Vargas, X. Wang, S.A. Wilson, Y. Yang, H.P. Zaveri, Y. Zhang, P. Zhao

Clinical Professors R.L. Lesser (Ophthalmology & Visual Science), S.R. Levy (Pediatrics), F.M. Testa, T.J. Walsh (Ophthalmology & Visual Science)

Associate Clinical Professors R.C. Delaney, J.C. McVeety, N.S. Werdiger, R.S. Young (Pediatrics)

Assistant Clinical Professors S.L. Bridgers, L.J. Cretella, T.Z. Fischer, J.B. Guarnaccia, M. Hasbani, M.J. Hasbani, D.S. Russell (Psychiatry), K.N. Sena, M.J. Stransky

Clinical Instructors S.S. Ali, O. Avitzur, P. Fattahi

Lecturer L. Bangalore

MD 2025 (NEUR)/MD 2000 (IM), Medical Approach to the Patient This twelve-week integrated clerkship includes internal medicine (eight weeks) and neurology (four weeks) clinical components. Throughout the clerkship, students participate in integrated experiences that address the themes related to hospital-based care such as management of acute disease, diagnostic skills, transitions of care, quality improvement, and organ systems. Directors: D.B. DiCapua, D.W. Dunne

NEUR 108b/NBIO 507b/NSCI 507b, Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Neurological Disease The course focuses on those diseases (Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, ALS, and other neurodegenerative diseases, triplet repeat induced diseases, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, etc.) in which modern neuroscience has advanced mechanistic explanations for clinical conditions. It highlights recent molecular, electrophysiological, and imaging experiments in parsing disease mechanisms. The application of pathophysiologic understanding to therapeutics is considered. S.S. Chandra, W.B. Cafferty

NEUR 200, Neurology Ward Service Elective Under appropriate supervision, students directly examine, diagnose, and manage patients on the neurology ward service at Yale-New Haven Hospital; attend daily teaching rounds; and attend a series of special didactic conferences on the most important topics in neurology. One student every four weeks. Director: D.B. DiCapua

NEUR 201, Neurology Consult Service Elective Under the supervision of the neurology consult resident and attending physician, students evaluate patients referred for neurologic consultation from other inpatient services at Yale-New Haven Hospital. Students also participate in academic activities of the department. One student every four weeks. Director: D.B. DiCapua

NEUR 202, Neurology Clinical Elective (Tailored) This is a customized elective for students who wish to do a two-week elective in neurology. Students in this tailored elective can choose the neurology wards, consults, or a specialties service such as epilepsy, stroke, movement disorders, neuromuscular medicine, neuroimmunology, pediatric neurology, and neurocritical care service. Students work with attending faculty and senior and junior residents. Students directly examine, diagnose, and manage patients; and they attend daily teaching rounds as well as a series of special didactic conferences and seminars on the most important topics in neurology. Students hone their ability to (1) obtain an accurate neurological history, (2) perform and interpret a neurological examination, (3) recognize the appropriate indications for ordering laboratory studies, and (4) interpret these studies through EEG, EMG, nerve conduction studies, evoked potentials, lumbar puncture, and CT and MR imaging of the brain and spinal cord. The goal is to recognize and understand less common neurological problems, including multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, neuromuscular diseases, dementia, central nervous system infections, and tumors of the nervous system. Prerequisite: NEUR 102, Clinical Neuroscience Core Clerkship. One student every two weeks. Director: D.B. DiCapua

NEUR 400, Neurology Subinternship The subinternship in clinical neurology is an advanced elective that offers students the opportunity to work at a higher level of independence and responsibility equivalent to that of an intern on the neurology ward service at Yale-New Haven Hospital. Students work directly with attending faculty, senior and junior residents, and support staff. Students directly examine, diagnose, and manage patients; and they attend daily teaching rounds as well as a series of special didactic conferences and seminars on the most important topics in neurology. Students hone their ability to (1) obtain an accurate neurological history, (2) perform and interpret a neurological examination, (3) recognize the appropriate indications for ordering laboratory studies, (4) interpret these studies through EEG, EMG, nerve conduction studies, evoked potentials, lumbar puncture, and CT and MR imaging of the brain and spinal cord. The goal is to recognize and understand less common neurological problems, including multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, neuromuscular diseases, dementia, central nervous system infections, and tumors of the nervous system. At times, other customized electives may be designed with the program director in areas such as epilepsy, stroke, movement disorders, neuromuscular diseases, neuroimmunology, and neurocritical care. Prerequisite: NEUR 102, Clinical Neuroscience Core Clerkship. One student every four weeks. Director: D.B. DiCapua

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Neurosurgery

TMP 4, 203.785.2805

http://medicine.yale.edu/neurosurgery

Professors H. Blumenfeld (Neurology), A. Bordey, R.A. Bronen (Diagnostic Radiology), R.T. Constable (Diagnostic Radiology), N.C. DeLanerolle, C.C. Duncan, C.A. Greer, D.M. Greer (Neurology), M. Gunel (Chair), H.P. Hetherington (Adjunct), M.H. Johnson (Diagnostic Radiology), C.C. LaMotte (Emeritus), J.A. Persing (Surgery), J.M. Piepmeier, D.E. Redmond, Jr. (Psychiatry), K.J. Ruskin (Anesthesiology), D.D. Spencer, A.N. Van den Pol

Associate Professors K.M. Abbed, J.M. Baehring (Neurology), K.R. Bulsara, V.L. Chiang, R.B. Duckrow (Neurology), J.T. King, A. Louvi, A. Williamson (Adjunct)

Assistant Professors I. Cavus (Psychiatry), M.L. DiLuna, T. Eid (Laboratory Medicine), D.J. Gaal (Anesthesiology), J.L. Gerrard, M.S. Laurans, C.C. Matouk, J. Moliterno Gunel, D.A. Petrucci, J. Schindler (Neurology), K.N. Sheth (Neurology), P. Tomak, K. Wu, J. Zhou

Research Scientist K. Yasuno

Associate Research Scientists A.G. Ercan-Sencicek, E. Erson Omay, O.I. Henegariu, J.T. Kennard, E. Martin-Lopez, K. Mishra, S. Nishimura, S.B. Omay, J.C. Paglino, D.J. Rodriguez-Gil, A. Serin Harmanci, D. Spergel, S. Yilmaz, X. Zhang

Clinical Professor J.F. Kveton (Surgery)

Associate Clinical Professor D.E. Nijensohn

Assistant Clinical Professors P.S. Dickey, P.B. Senatus

Clinical Instructor K.E. Holmes

NEUS 101, Neurosurgery Subinternship The goals of this full-time, four-week subinternship experience are to work as a team; develop clinical skills, patient management strategies, in-depth understanding of patients assigned, and fundamental operative skills; and be able to articulate differential diagnosis and treatment options for faculty and residents. The subinternship is designed to give the student maximum opportunity to see inpatients and outpatients with neurosurgical problems and to have a correlation with neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and neuropathology. A major portion of the time is patient-care-oriented, with specific subject-oriented assignments in the basic neurological sciences. Students are expected to round with their team, follow their patients, participate in operative cases, and present at teaching conferences. This subinternship is required for Yale School of Medicine students planning to enter the match for neurosurgery and is strongly recommended prior to outside subinternship experiences.

Students who wish to have a more limited exposure to the field as an elective may choose a two-week rotation; and outside (non-Yale) students may wish to opt for a two-week experience if their scheduling is limited. Additional information is available at http://medicine.yale.edu/neurosurgery. Maximum of four students every four weeks. Codirectors: C.C. Duncan, C.C. Matouk

NEUS 102, Investigational Neuroscience Typically taken during completion of the thesis requirement. Specific projects are by agreement with faculty members. Ongoing laboratory research includes the molecular neuroanatomical assessment of the epileptic focus (N.C. DeLanerolle); ultrastructural assessment of organization and plasticity in local synaptic networks (C.A. Greer); use of viruses and viral vectors to treat brain cancer and neurological dysfunction (A.N. Van den Pol); understanding tuberous sclerosis complex and mTOR contribution to neurodevelopmental disorders associated with cognitive deficits (A. Bordey); human and animal slice electrophysiology and metabolism (A. Bordey); human and animal intracerebral microdialysis (D.D. Spencer, T. Eid); image-guided neurosurgical robotics and biophysical studies of brain imaging (D.D. Spencer, J. Duncan); stimulation of the brain for chronic neurological diseases (R.B. Duckrow, D.D. Spencer); molecular genetics of neurological disease (M. Gunel, M.L. DiLuna); molecular mechanisms of brain morphogenesis and pathogenesis (A. Louvi); metabolome analysis in cerebral vasospasm, angiogenesis and neurogenesis, skull base anatomy, bypass techniques, and endovascular technology development (K.R. Bulsara); characterization of ensheathing cells in promoting axonal elongation (C.A. Greer); biodegradable nanoparticles for convection enhanced delivery of therapy for malignant gliomas (J.M. Piepmeier, J. Zhou). Clinical research includes spine disease and clinical trials (K.M. Abbed), epilepsy surgery (D.D. Spencer), pediatric neurosurgery outcomes (C.C. Duncan, M.L. DiLuna), neurooncology (J.M. Piepmeier, J.M. Baehring), basic mechanisms in CNS lymphoma, and stereotactic radiosurgery (V.L. Chiang). Available throughout the year. Arrangements made with C.A. Greer

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Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences

FMB 307, 203.785.4212, Janice Crabtree, Manager of Medical Education

http://medicine.yale.edu/obgyn

Professors A.M. Arici, M.B. Bracken (Epidemiology), F.R. Braveman (Anesthesiology), R. Bukowski, T.C. Chai (Urology), J.A. Copel, T. D’Hooghe (Adjunct), S. Diano, A.J. Duleba (Adjunct), R.A. Ehrenkranz (Pediatrics), S.A. Higgins (Therapeutic Radiology), R.B. Hochberg, T.L. Horvath (Comparative Medicine), H. Kennedy (Nursing), E.I. Kohorn (Emeritus), C. Leranth, P.E. Levi Setti (Adjunct), H. Lin (Cell Biology), C.J. Lockwood (Adjunct), W.E. Longo (Surgery), M.J. Mahoney (Genetics), S.M. McCarthy (Diagnostic Radiology), G.G. Mor, M.J. Paidas, P. Patrizio, S. Pecorelli (Adjunct), A.D. Santin, P.M. Sarrel (Emeritus), P.E. Schwartz, F.A. Tavassoli (Pathology), H.S. Taylor (Chair), K.A. Yonkers (Psychiatry)

Associate Professors V.M. Abrahams, M.M. Abu-Khalaf (Medicine), M. Azodi, M.O. Bahtiyar, V. Bhandari (Pediatrics), C. Bulletti (Adjunct), F. Galerneau, X. Gao (Comparative Medicine), J.B. Henrich (Medicine), Y. Huang, P. Hui (Pathology), J.L. Illuzzi, M. Lee (Adjunct), H.S. Lipkind, U. Magriples, L. Pal, C.M. Pettker, L.M. Rickey (Urology), D. Sakkas (Adjunct), A.K. Sfakianaki, D. Silasi, N.L. Stanwood

Assistant Professors S. Abdel-Razeq, N. Adsuar, R.S. Bercik, K.H. Campbell, S.N. Cross, V.B. Desai, E.C. Dun, L.L. Fan, M.C. Fishman, C.A. Flannery, A. Gariepy, M.K. Guess, C.S. Han (Adjunct), A.N. Kallen, R. Kaza, P.H. Kodaman, K. Kohari, N.E. Kummer, M.D. Lalioti (Adjunct), B. Litkouhi, W. Mak, J. Martin, E. Ratner, E. Robinson, J.A. Shaw, S.S. Sheth, M. Silasi, A.V. Vash-Margita, R.J. Welsh, X. Xu

Instructors M. Alvarez, B.R. Ball, J.D. Black, L.R. Bruck, S. Collins, J. Deng, A. Desai, C. Duke, K.R. Heim, P.W. Hendrix, R. Irani, G. Menderes, M. Platner, N. Qasba, A. Russo, C.L. Schwab, R. Tal, L. Tuzovic, L.C. Zuckerwise

Senior Research Scientists S.M. Guller, G.B. Huszar, N.S. Stachenfeld

Research Scientists A. Alvero, J. Johnson, H.J. Kliman, G. Krikun

Associate Research Scientists M. Basar, S. Bellone, D. Kelk, J. Kim, K. Lowther, L. Lundsberg, R. Mamillapalli, Y. Yang

Clinical Professors D. Greenfeld, V.A. Lynch, M. Minkin, H.J. Sauer, S.S. Spangler, R.J. Stiller

Associate Clinical Professors R.D. Auerbach, Y. Barnhard, S.E. Casper, R.A. Cwik, S.J. Fleischman, T.M. Hanson, R.B. Kaump, G.E. Kleinman, N.A. Ravski, S.M. Richman, S. Shahabi, H. Simon

Assistant Clinical Professors N. Achong Dorvilus, P.C. Brines, A.R. Chelouche, R. Chosak, P.J. Coppola, J. Cron, J.A. Cuteri, R.C. Deal, M. Dube, E.A. Fine, S.M. Flaherty, W.P. Fleming, K.C. Fletcher, D.P. Fox, M.E. Gillette, D. Gottschall, B.D. Karsif, J.M. Knudson, S.A. Laifer, P.M. Lamastra, M.R. Laser, D.M. Lima, S. Mark (Medicine), R.D. Moscarelli, L. Plisic, R. Pringle, M.S. Reel, B.F. Rigney, A.M. Ross, D.M. Roth, D.J. Russell, T. Spurrell, L.A. Starace-Colabella, A. Strong, O.J. Vincent, M.J. Wise, T. Zreik

Clinical Instructors A. Acharya, M. Albright (Nursing), M.C. Asis, K.R. Aversa, M.A. Baumbusch, U. Bhuvanesh, E.E. Blair, S.M. Cassell, K. Chacho, R.D. Choudhary, C. Cookson, N. DeGennaro (Nursing), K. Despot, G. Dunston-Boone, A.Y. Edusa, J.T. Grosso, C.R. Huttler, C.M. Jevitt (Nursing), N. Kaushal, N.R. Kellett (Office of Medical Education), D.R. Kopel, H. Lope De Haro, G. Lynch, B.L. Maloy, E. McMahon, E.M. Morelli (Nursing), M. Murray, C. Negron, M. Nwosu, E. Palluotto, C.E. Presnick, K.M. Rath, S. Reilly (Nursing), J.A. Reinshagen (Office of Medical Education), M.C. Rhee, A.G. Shorten (Nursing), M.L. Speranza, J.P. Stanek (Nursing), S. Tandon, M. Telfer, K.A. Thomas, A.L. Tirado, D. Tonzola, M. Torbey, M.M. Tse, J.D. Vulte (Office of Medical Education), S.D. Wheeler (Nursing), R. Wineland

Lecturers F.P. Haseltine, C. Kress, A.E. Moss (Office of Medical Education)

Clinicians M.L. Polan, E.U. Seli

MD 2150 (OBGY)/MD 2175 (PEDS), Women and Children’s Health This twelve-week integrated clerkship includes clinical components in obstetrics and gynecology and pediatrics. Students participate in four weeks of OB/Gyn inpatient, four weeks of pediatric inpatient, and four weeks of combined OB/Gyn and pediatric outpatient clinical experiences. Throughout the clerkship students participate in integrated experiences that cover themes such as health and development, preventive care, sexual health, families and communities, health promotion and disease prevention, and perinatal care. All students attend an evening session with the gynecologic teaching associates. Directors: E.R. Colson, D.C. Hersh, S.R. Pathy

OBGY 107, Maternal Fetal Medicine Subinternship The Maternal Fetal Medicine division offers a four-week high-risk obstetrics elective for fourth-year medical students. The student functions as a subintern and team member in the care of high-risk obstetrical patients at Yale-New Haven Hospital. In addition to inpatient duties, the student attends the outpatient clinic once a week. Students also participate in prenatal ultrasound sessions as well as labor and delivery activities. Numerous didactic conferences are held during the rotation. It is recommended that students use the text Williams Obstetrics (Cunningham) to prepare for this experience and for research during the rotation. Evaluation of the student is based on clinical performance, participation at rounds, and the student’s presentation of one evidence-based case review to members of the MFM division. Prerequisite: OBGY 103 or equivalent. Students are expected to work two weekend days of their choice. One student every four weeks. Director: F. Galerneau

OBGY 108, Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Subinternship The Reproductive Endocrine and Infertility (REI) division offers a four-week elective for fourth- and fifth-year students. In addition to gaining knowledge about human reproductive endocrine function, students are introduced to disruptions in physiology and function, which can lead to endocrinological and infertility disorders. Common problems seen in REI practice include female and male infertility, recurrent pregnancy loss, polycystic ovarian syndrome, anovulation, amenorrhea, endometriosis, chronic pelvic pain, abnormal uterine bleeding, and uterine leiomyomas. Exposure to Advanced Reproductive Technologies (ART) is integrated into this elective. In addition to clinical activities in the office and the hospital, students have the opportunity to attend division conferences. Evaluation is based on clinical performance in the office and the operating room, and on an evidence-based presentation on an REI topic of interest. Recommended text: Clinical Gynecological Endocrinology & Infertility (Speroff). Prerequisite: OBGY 103 or equivalent. During this rotation, it is necessary to travel back and forth between Yale-New Haven Hospital and the Long Wharf Medical Center, 150 Sargent Drive, New Haven. One student every four weeks. Director: P.H. Kodaman

OBGY 109, Gynecologic Oncology Subinternship The purpose of the oncology elective is to enhance the student’s knowledge of the diagnosis and management of women with gynecologic malignancies. The student is exposed to all modalities of treatment for gynecologic malignancies including radical gynecological surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. The student is expected to be an integral part of the team in the management of the patients admitted to the service. The student admits patients and takes part in their care throughout the elective period. In addition to operating room exposure, extensive experience is gained in the postoperative management of these patients. In the ambulatory setting, the student is exposed to the outpatient management of cancer, chemotherapy, and colposcopy. On a weekly basis, the student also attends divisional teaching sessions and the multidisciplinary tumor conference. There is no night call on this elective. The recommended text is Clinical Gynecologic Oncology (DiSaia). Prerequisite: OBGY 103 or equivalent. One student every four weeks. Director: E. Ratner

OBGY 110, Obstetrics & Gynecology Elective, Gallup Indian Medical Center (New Mexico) The general Ob/Gyn department of the Gallup Indian Medical Center (GIMC) in New Mexico offers a subinternship in obstetrics and gynecology to fourth- and fifth-year Yale medical students. This center provides Ob/Gyn health care to a growing underserved population. There are no residents at GIMC, and the student therefore gains first-assistant experience during this rotation. The center has 20,000 outpatient visits, 750 deliveries, and 400 surgical cases per year. Bedside rounds, hands-on teaching, formal and informal lectures, and weekly conferences (high-risk Ob/Gyn M&M, C-section review) are integrated into this extramural elective. Students also experience an immersion in the Navajo culture. Evaluation of students is based on clinical performance, participation at rounds, and a final case-based presentation. Night call is approximately every 4–5 nights. The recommended text for this elective is Danforth’s Obstetrics and Gynecology. Prerequisite: OBGY 103 or equivalent. Students are responsible for the cost of travel, lodging, and miscellaneous expenses. One or two students every four weeks. Director: G. Lynch (on site at GIMC, New Mexico)

OBGY 112, Family Planning Elective This two- or four-week elective provides hands-on experience in family planning in diverse clinical settings. Family planning clinics provide resources to enable couples to determine whether, when, and how often to have children, with special consideration to birth spacing and maternal and child health. The student is exposed to contraceptive counseling and options counseling (abortion, adoption, parenthood). Contraceptive counseling and care include insertion of long-acting reversible contraceptive methods (LARC, IUDs, and implants). In addition, the student participates in first-trimester ultrasound, medical and surgical abortions, medical and surgical management of early pregnancy failures, and intrauterine fetal demise. The student is expected to be an active participant in all aspects of patient care. Clinical settings include outpatient visits and operating room experience at Yale-New Haven Hospital and Planned Parenthood in New Haven. During this rotation, it is necessary to travel back and forth between YNHH and Planned Parenthood in New Haven (345 Whitney Avenue). Prerequisite: OBGY 103 or equivalent. One student every two or four weeks. Co-directors: N.L. Stanwood, A. Gariepy

OBGY 203, Urogynecology and Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery Service Internship Offered by the Section of Urogynecology and Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery. Students are taught about the normal and abnormal physiology and function of the female pelvic floor and are introduced to the diagnosis and management of female pelvic floor disorders, namely lower urinary tract disorders, pelvic organ prolapse, and defecatory disorders. Common problems encountered by urogynecologists, include urinary incontinence, recurrent urinary tract infections, cystocele, rectocele, uterine prolapse, vaginal vault prolapse after hysterectomy, microscopic hematuria, dyspareunia, interstitial cystitis, anal incontinence, and constipation. Exposure to advanced pelvic floor reconstructive surgery is also integrated into this elective. In addition to clinical activities in the office and the hospital, students have the opportunity to attend section didactics. Evaluation is based on clinical performance in the office and the operating room, participation in didactics, and an evidence-based presentation on a urogynecology topic of interest. Required text: Walters and Karram, Urogynecology. Prerequisite: OBGY 103. One student every four weeks. Director: M.K. Guess

OBGY 208, Obstetrics & Gynecology Outpatient Elective This elective provides a broad exposure to outpatient gynecologic issues commonly encountered in the ambulatory setting, such as contraception, menstrual abnormalities, pelvic pain, vaginitis and sexually transmitted disease, infertility, disorders of urinary continence, screening for gynecologic malignancies, and management of menopausal symptoms. The student also has the opportunity to participate in the prenatal care of pregnant women in order to gain a deeper understanding of the changes in maternal physiology throughout gestation, prenatal diagnosis, genetic counseling, and the outpatient management of the pregnant woman and her fetus. The student’s time can be distributed, based on student’s interests and schedule, among Yale-New Haven Hospital Women’s Center, the Yale Urogynecology practice, the Yale Gynecologic Oncology Colposcopy Clinic, the Yale Maternal-Fetal Medicine practice, the Yale Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility practice, and the private community office setting. Prerequisite: OBGY 103 or equivalent. One student every two or four weeks. Director: J.L. Illuzzi

OBGY 270, Obstetrics & Gynecology Subinternship, Bridgeport Hospital Students actively participate in an Ob/Gyn team-centered learning environment at a community hospital. Prerequisite: OBGY 103 or equivalent. One or two students every four weeks. Director: H.J. Sauer

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Ophthalmology and Visual Science

40 Temple Street, 3rd floor, 203.785.2020

http://medicine.yale.edu/eyes

Professors R.A. Adelman, M. Coca-Prados (Adjunct; Emeritus), M.C. Crair (Neurobiology), N. Daw (Emeritus), C. Gonzalez (Emeritus), W.H. Miller (Emeritus), M.L. Sears (Emeritus), M. Shields (Emeritus), J.H. Sinard (Pathology), V. Vasiliou (Epidemiology), Z. Zhou

Associate Professors J.B. Demb, J.J. Hoh (Epidemiology), M.A. Materin (Medicine), L.J. Rizzolo (Surgery), K.M. Stoessel, C.J. Zeiss (Comparative Medicine), D. Zenisek (Cellular & Molecular Physiology)

Assistant Professors B. Chen, J.H. Chow, M.S. Ehrlich, J.A. Galvin, T.M. Grippo (Adjunct), J.E. Kempton, I. Kim, N.E. Kombo, J. Liu, P.C. Palmisano

Instructors N. Chadha, P.A. Coady, S. Garcia Santana

Associate Research Scientists S. Lee, J. Park

Clinical Professors I. Abrahams, R.L. Lesser, D.E. Silverstone, T.J. Walsh

Associate Clinical Professors B.M. DeBroff, S.H. Forster, P. Gaudio, P.H. Haffner, A.J. Levada, M.S. Milner, J.J. Olson, A.D. Rose, G. Shafranov, C.A. Sklar, R.A. Wiznia

Assistant Clinical Professors D.A. Bacal, P.J. Branden, N. Chaudhry, A.J. Daccache, V.P. de Luise, L. Doctor, P.A. Ecker, J.S. Elman, G.T. Emerick, P.M. Falcone, H.E. Fazzone, A.J. Fezza, K.C. Gagnon, J. Geffin, P.C. Guida, S.B. Hersh, M.A. Howard, A.M. Hwang, W.I. Larrison, F. Levin, E.S. Lim, J.F. Martone, A.W. Mead, R.J. Noecker, A. Romania, A. Shayegani, C.A. Sierra, J. Sokol, S.M. Soloway, D. Tom, J.M. Weisz, M.L. Weitzman, B.D. Zuckerman

Clinical Instructors S.B. Castracane, T.H. Cronin, M. Dombrow, O. Faridi, A.H. Guerrero, Y. Kostina-O’Neil, D.H. Levinson, P.A. Marks, P.E. Masi, S.W. Meskin, J.J. Pasternack, L.K. Robbins, M.R. Shapiro, J.E. Silbert, A.P. Swan, S.C. Thornquist, E.L. Volker

OPHT 120, Ophthalmology and Visual Science Clinical Elective This intensive two- or four-week elective consists of ten half-day sessions per week. Students observe in specialty clinics and ophthalmic surgery. More advanced students evaluate patients in a general ophthalmology clinic. Students are expected to participate in departmental conferences and review independent study material provided by the department. Subspecialty experience includes cornea and external eye disease, glaucoma, neuro-ophthalmology, oculoplastics, retinal disease, and strabismus. By the end of the elective, students should be able to recognize the four most common causes of profound blindness and be able to identify vision-threatening and non-vision-threatening causes of a red eye; perform an external eye exam; use an ophthalmoscope to identify the optic nerve and be able to describe it; and have some familiarity with the slit lamp. Students who do the four-week elective are expected to do a presentation at the end of the rotation. Evaluation is based on clinic performance, the case discussions, and the presentation. Teaching settings include the Yale Eye Center; the Yale Health Center; the Eye Clinic at the West Haven VA Medical Center; and the Cornell Scott-Hill Health Center. Prerequisite: second-year ophthalmology module or equivalent. Maximum of three students every two or four weeks. Director: S.H. Forster

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Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation

YPB 133, 203.785.2579

http://medicine.yale.edu/ortho

Professors M.R. Baumgaertner, C.G. Carpenter (Emeritus), T.O. Carpenter (Pediatrics), D.R. Cooperman, J. Costa (Pathology), G.E. Friedlaender (Chair), A.H. Haims (Diagnostic Radiology), M.C. Horowitz, P. Jokl, L.D. Katz (Diagnostic Radiology), K.J. Keggi, M.M. Panjabi (Emeritus), R.R. Pelker, T.S. Renshaw (Emeritus), B.G. Smith, W.O. Southwick (Emeritus)

Associate Professors T.A. Blaine, S.D. Dodds, J.V. Eswarakumar, J.N. Grauer, D.M. Lindskog, M.J. Medvecky, J.S. Reach, C.R. Swigart, P.G. Whang, J.J. Yue

Assistant Professors C.W. Carter, N.E. Casemyr, F. Fishman, J.A. Fretz, E.C. Gardner, M.P. Leslie, M. Sharkey, K.M. Sutton, S. Tommasini, R.J. Walls

Instructors S. Gallacher, A. Halim, O. Lamikanra, C.P. Miller, J. Piposar, A. Yacob

Senior Research Scientists C.G. Carpenter, A.M. Vignery

Associate Research Scientists P.C. Ivancic, L. Li

Clinical Professors J.K. Lynch, U.H. Weil

Associate Clinical Professors H.B. Bradburn, D.S. Rosenblum, E.J. Sella

Assistant Clinical Professors M.P. Altman, J.M. Aversa, N. Babu, R.A. Bernstein, D.S. Caminear, M.P. Connair, J.P. Daigneault, P.A. DeLuca, D.H. Gibson, G.A. Gorecki, J.F. Irving, M.J. Kaplan, J.V. Lieponis, M.A. Luchini, P.P. Luchini, R.B. Mayor, J.D. McCallum, P. Minotti, T. Moran, M.J. Murphy, D.C. Novicki, M.M. Pressman, J.F. Raycroft, A.M. Reznik, A. Rice, C.J. Rosenberg, A.B. Sicklick, M.D. Silver, J.M. Sumner, S.L. Tomak, S. Vyce, L.D. Weis, V.J. Williams, J. Wu, R.A. Zell

Clinical Instructors J.M. Beiner, M.A. Carey, E.J. Carlson, M.R. Clain, R. Diana, R.P. Hendrikson, N.R. Kaplan, J.D. Kelley, K.M. Kramer, D.P. Sakalkale, P.M. Sethi, R.A. Stanton, P.B. Stovell

Lecturers L.R. Brenner, M.J. Parisi, R.E. Stevenson, B.T. Zazulak

ORTH 104, Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation Subinternship Limited to third, fourth, and fifth clinical years. Students are active members of one of seven orthopaedic teaching teams: Adult Reconstruction and Orthopaedic Oncology, Orthopaedic Trauma and Fracture Care, Pediatric Orthopaedics, Spine Surgery, Hand and Upper Extremity Surgery, Sports Medicine and Arthroscopic Surgery, and Foot and Ankle Surgery. Students assist in the management of orthopaedic inpatients and receive operating room experience in both the inpatient and outpatient settings. Participation in the orthopaedic outpatient clinics provides experience in the evaluation and treatment of common musculoskeletal conditions. It is recommended that students take call with the orthopaedic resident in the emergency room to gain insight into the principles of acute fracture management. Clinic and operating room experiences are supplemented by weekly subspecialty conferences and the residents’ education program. Maximum of five students every four weeks. Director: S.D. Dodds

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Pathology

BML 140, 203.785.3624

http://medicine.yale.edu/pathology

Professors R. Bucala (Medicine), D. Chhieng, Y. Choi, J. Costa, G.E. Friedlaender (Orthopaedics & Rehabilitation), P.G. Gallagher (Pediatrics), E.J. Glusac, R.J. Homer, S.D. Hudnall, P. Hui, P. Humphrey, D. Jain (Internal Medicine), M. Kashgarian (Emeritus), J.H. Kim (Emeritus), D.S. Krause (Laboratory Medicine), G. Kupfer (Pediatrics), T. Kyriakides, J.A. Madri, V.T. Marchesi, J.M. McNiff (Dermatology), W. Min, M. Mooseker (Molecular, Cellular, & Developmental Biology), J.S. Morrow (Chair), J.S. Pober (Immunobiology), M. Prasad, D.L. Rimm, M.E. Robert, J.K. Rose, G.S. Shadel, J.H. Sinard, J.L. Sklar, D.F. Stern, F.A. Tavassoli, A. West, W. Yarbrough

Associate Professors A. Adeniran, M.W. Bosenberg (Dermatology), D. Braddock, J.L. Brandsma (Adjunct), G. Cai, S. Chang (Laboratory Medicine), S.E. Cowper (Dermatology), L. Hao, M. Harigopal, S.H. Kleinstein, Y. Kluger, C.J. Ko (Dermatology), D. Kowalski, M.O. Krauthammer, R. Lazova (Dermatology), K.A. Mitchell-Richards, G. Moeckel, R. Morotti, V. Parkash, A. Subtil-Deoliveira (Dermatology), A.O. Vortmeyer, Z. Walther, Q. Yan

Assistant Professors R. Bindra (Therapeutic Radiology), V. Bossuyt, N. Buza, K. Choate (Dermatology), P. Cohen, S. Fernandez, K. Finberg, A. Galan (Dermatology), J.A. Gibson, B. Gould Rothberg (Yale Cancer Center), S. Hattangadi (Pediatrics), M. Hurwitz (Yale Cancer Center), A.J. Huttner, R. Jensen (Therapeutic Radiology), Anita Kamath, S.G. Katz, A. Levi, D. Nguyen, M.M. Pinto, K. Politi (Medicine), Y. Qyang (Medicine), Y. Suarez (Comparative Medicine), N. Wajapeyee, M.L. Xu, X. Zhang

Instructors A.L. Barbieri, S. Chaudhary, U. Ozerdem, E. Patonay, A. Siddon, S. Wong

Senior Research Scientists M. Centrella, M. Kashgarian, J.H. Kim

Research Scientists P. Gershkovich, T.L. McCarthy, R. Means, M.M. Wan

Associate Research Scientists R.A. Albright, Y. Bai, L.P. Blair, R.L. Camp, J. Cao, A. Chattopadhyay, D. Chen, K. Cheung, R. Cong, S.M. Lang, Z. Liu, X. Ma, V. Neumeister, V. Pelekanou, K. Schalper, L. Shao, M.C. Stankewich, J. Wang, L. Yu, H. Zhang

Associate Clinical Professors P.N. Fiedler, I. Nash

Assistant Clinical Professors R.N. Eisen, J. Gill, I. Hahn, B.C. Kenney, A. Neto

Clinical Instructor C. Haberland

PATH 200, Molecular and Genomic Mechanisms of Disease This is predominantly a seminar course that covers aspects of the fundamental molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying various human diseases in the context of various clinical scenarios. The objective is to highlight advances in genomic and molecular medicine as they relate to understanding the pathogenesis of disease and the formulation of therapies. There are a few lectures on autopsy pathology and one lecture on bioinformatics. The course is only open to medical students. Various times. R.J. Homer and staff

PATH 505, Neuropathology Elective The core of the elective is shadowing a neuro­pathologist at work. As experience is gained, core functions of tissue evaluation, processing, and examination can be performed by the student. One or two students every two or four weeks. A.O. Vortmeyer

PATH 600, Pathological Basis of Human Disease Fundamental principles underlying the pathological alterations in function and structure that constitute the reaction of the organism to injury. Pathology of diseases involving neoplasia and special organs and systems. Correlation of the clinical and anatomical manifestations is emphasized. For Public Health graduate students and MSTP students who are required to take PATH 100 for graduate credit. R.J. Homer and staff

PATH 616, Autopsy Pathology This course provides participation in the autopsy service with house staff in pathology. It covers proper performance of the autopsy including dissection, documentation and reporting, presentation of autopsy findings, and communication of medical opinions formed from the autopsy. The work includes involvement in dissection of cases, review of gross pathology, submission of sections for histology, review of microscopic slides, preparation of reports of findings, and involvement in investigative procedures related to necropsy material. Opportunities exist for correlation studies with previous biopsies and for clinical investigative and cell biologic techniques in relation to necropsy material and attendance. Six weeks minimum, enrollment limited to two students.

PATH 617, Anatomic Pathology Elective The department offers an elective to medical students in the third or fourth year that provides a broad experience in general diagnostic techniques. Students have opportunities to participate in autopsy pathology, cytopathology, and surgical pathology. A daily diagnostic conference is scheduled for both residents and students. In addition to direct responsibilities in autopsy and surgical pathology areas, the student has opportunities to participate in electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, molecular diagnostics, and flow cytometry techniques. One or two students every two or four weeks. Director: A. Adeniran

PATH 618b, Clinical and Pathologic Correlates in Renal Disease A series of clinical pathologic conferences designed to illustrate clinicopathologic correlates in renal disease. At each session, one student acts as clinician and another as pathologist in the evaluation and discussion of case material from autopsies or renal biopsies. Discussions are informal but require preparation in advance, and all participants are expected to contribute in each session. One two-hour session per week for six weeks. Given once in spring term. Limited to twelve students. G. Moeckel

PATH 619/LMED 619, Anatomic Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Combined Elective The goals for anatomic pathology are to understand the basic principles of diagnostic anatomic pathology and its role in clinical medicine. The goals for laboratory medicine are to learn appropriate usage and interpretation of laboratory tests and to gain a better understanding of the theoretical, technological, and clinical underpinnings of laboratory medicine. This elective is appropriate for students considering a career in laboratory medicine and/or pathology, and for all students who will use laboratory and pathology tests in their careers. One or two students every four weeks. Directors: A. Adeniran, M. Landry

PATH 620a and b, Laboratory Rotations in Experimental Pathology Laboratory rotations for first-year graduate students. T. Kyriakides

PATH 630b/ENAS 535bU, Biomaterial-Tissue Interactions The course addresses the interactions between tissues and biomaterials, with an emphasis on the importance of molecular- and cellular-level events in dictating the performance and longevity of clinically relevant devices. In addition, specific areas such as biomaterials for tissue engineering and the importance of stem/progenitor cells, and biomaterial-mediated gene and drug delivery are addressed. T. Kyriakides

PATH 650b, Cellular and Molecular Biology of Cancer A comprehensive survey of cancer research from the cellular to the clinical level. The relation of cancer to intracellular and intercellular regulation of cell proliferation is emphasized, as are animal models for cancer research. Background in molecular genetics and cell biology is assumed. Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the organizers. D.F. Stern, Q. Yan

PATH 660/C&MP 650/PHAR 580, The Responsible Conduct of Research Organized to foster discussion, the course is taught by faculty in the Pharmacology, Pathology, and Physiology departments and two or three senior graduate students. Each session is based on case studies from primary literature, reviews, and two texts: Francis Macrina’s Scientific Integrity and Kathy Barker’s At the Bench. Each week, students are required to submit a reaction paper discussing the reading assignment. Students take turns leading the class discussion; a final short paper on a hot topic in bioethics is required. B.E. Ehrlich, D. Braddock

PATH 670b, Biological Mechanisms of Reaction to Injury An introduction to human biology and disease as a manifestation of reaction to injury. Topics include organ structure and function, cell injury, circulatory and inflammatory responses, disordered physiology, and neoplasia. S.D. Hudnall, J.A. Gibson, J.A. Madri, J.S. Morrow, J.L. Sklar

PATH 680a/C&MP 630a/PHAR 502a, Seminar in Molecular Medicine, Pharmacology, and Physiology Readings and discussion on a diverse range of current topics in molecular medicine, pharmacology, and physiology. The class emphasizes analysis of primary research literature and development of presentation and writing skills. Contemporary articles are assigned on a related topic every week, and a student leads discussions with input from faculty who are experts in the topic area. The overall goal is to cover a specific topic of medical relevance (e.g., cancer, neurodegeneration) from the perspective of three primary disciplines (i.e., physiology: normal function; pathology: abnormal function; and pharmacology: intervention). D. Nguyen, T. Boggon

PATH 690a, Molecular Mechanisms of Disease This course covers aspects of the fundamental molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying various human diseases. Many of the disorders discussed represent major forms of infectious, degenerative, vascular, neoplastic, and inflammatory disease. Additionally, certain rarer diseases that illustrate good models for investigation and/or application of basic biologic principles are covered in the course. The objective is to highlight advances in experimental and molecular medicine as they relate to understanding the pathogenesis of disease and the formulation of therapies. N. Wajapeyee

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Pediatrics

LMP 4085, 203.785.4638

http://medicine.yale.edu/pediatrics

Professors W.A. Andiman, R.J. Antaya (Dermatology), R.S. Baltimore, G.P. Beardsley, C.W. Bogue, L.M. Buckley (Medicine), M. Cappello, S. Caprio, T.O. Carpenter, M.G. Caty (Surgery), E.R. Colson, J.A. Copel (Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences), D.F. Donnelly, C.C. Duncan (Neurosurgery), M.E. Egan, R.A. Ehrenkranz, S.H. Emre (Surgery), J.T. Fahey, R.L. Fisher (Medicine), B.W. Forsyth, A.H. Friedman, P.G. Gallagher, W.D. Graf, I. Gross, J.R. Gruen, J.P. Hafler, W.E. Hellenbrand, A.L. Horwich (Genetics), G. Kupfer, J.F. Leckman (Child Study Center), J.M. Leventhal, J. Lichtor (Anesthesiology), G. Lister, M.J. Mahoney (Genetics), L.C. Mayes (Child Study Center), P.L. McCarthy, L.R. Ment, M.R. Mercurio, G. Miller, I. Miller, P.K. Mistry (Medicine), S.A. Ryan, K. Santucci, M.R. Seashore (Genetics), E.D. Shapiro, B.A. Shaywitz, S.E. Shaywitz, R.N. Shiffman, B.G. Smith (Orthopaedics & Rehabilitation), B.R. Smith (Laboratory Medicine), W.V. Tamborlane, F.R. Volkmar (Child Study Center), C.C. Weitzman, J. Woolston (Child Study Center)

Associate Professors N.A. Ameen, L.D. Arnold, A.G. Asnes, J. Asnes, C.R. Baum, A. Bazzy-Asaad, K.A. Bechtel, M.J. Bizzarro, M. Brueckner, K. Chawarska (Child Study Center), L. Chen, K. Dhodapkar, B.R. Doolittle (Medicine), U.D. Ekong, E.V. Faustino, A.M. Fenick, J.S. Giuliano, Jr., J.N. Grauer (Orthopaedics & Rehabilitation), J. Hendrickson (Laboratory Medicine), A.L. Hsiao, N. Kadan-Lottick, M.K. Khokha, M. Langhan, R.A. Martinello (Medicine), J.M. McNamara, R. Morotti (Pathology), E. Paintsil, J.M. Panisello, D.S. Pashankar, F.D. Pashankar, M.I. Rodriguez-Davalos (Surgery), L.E. Rosenfeld (Medicine), A. Tufro, M. Vázquez, S.A. Weinzimer, P.G. Weiss, T. Zhang (Medicine), Z. Zhu

Assistant Professors P.L. Aronson, M. Auerbach, A.K. Berkwitt, L.A. Beslow, E.M. Bruscia, C.A. Canapari, E. Cengiz, S.D. Chirnomas, M.A. Choma (Diagnostic Radiology), E.R. Christison-Lagay (Surgery), M.X. Cicero, O.M. Couloures, A.I. Del Valle-Segarra (Adjunct), M.L. DiLuna (Neurosurgery), A.S. El-Guindy, R.W. Elder, B.L. Emerson, A.E. Esquibies, J.A. Galvin (Ophthalmology & Visual Science), R.K. Gill, J.E. Goodwin, M.R. Grossman, A.R. Gupta, E.K. Hall, S. Hattangadi, D.C. Hersh, A.B. Hittelman (Urology), A.M. Jastreboff (Medicine), L.C. Johnston, S. Kandil, M.W. Kent, O. Levit, K.F. Liem, J. Loyal, N. Makhani, A.M. Marks, E. Michaelides (Surgery), R.L. Moles, D.E. Ozgediz (Surgery), A.D. Patel, S.G. Pels, U.P. Phatak, E. Pinter, A.F. Porto, C.C. Price (Medicine), A. Riera, N.D. Romberg, J.L. Sherr, M. Spencer-Manzon (Genetics), D.M. Steinbacher (Surgery), G.Y. Tiyyagura, B.P. Weeks, C.G. Weismann, H.Z. Zhang (Genetics)

Instructors S. Banker, E. Deniz, B.R. Herrin, S.Kwon, N. Nadeau, E.A. Nozetz, R. Osborn, L. Pavlovic

Research Scientists E. Drye, J.M. McGrath (Comparative Medicine)

Associate Research Scientists M. Ahsan, A. Ali, J.M. Ambrosino, L. Balsamo, X. Chen, F. Del Viso, K.B. Dorsey, D.V. Kravtsov, E. Legue, M. Li, Q. Li, K.E. Marchione, A. Robson, M.S. Rosenthal, N. Santoro, V. Schulz, S.S. Stahl (Child Study Center), M.A. Van Name, K. Yu

Clinical Professors R. Angoff, M.A. Berman, H. Jacobs, S.R. Levy (Neurology), B.M. McDonald, C. Randolph, S.Z. Spiesel, F.M. Testa (Neurology), J.H. Zelson

Associate Clinical Professors A.J. Avni-Singer, K.M. Berkwits, H.D. Bornstein, C. Canny, R.D. Chessin, D.H. Dreyfus, S.I. Escalera, M.B. Flaherty-Hewitt, R.M. Freedman, M.W. Galal, G.S. Germain, C.W. Goff, F.L. Gruskay, J. Hen, R.A. Herzlinger, M.P. Hommel, C.F. Mann, S.K. Nallainathan, S.M. Peterec, E.L. Stone, S.N. Sudikoff, S.C. Updegrove, S.A. Walsh, P.P. Wang, C.C. Wood, R.S. Young

Assistant Clinical Professors R.J. Anderson, L. Ardeshirpour, S. Baker (Surgery), S. Bogursky, S. Boulware, C.G. Butler, A. Cameron, M.S. Cohen, N. Condulis, N. Czarkowski, M.E. Dilorenzo, C.L. Dorfman, A. Driggers, D.P. Durante, M. Ellison, K.A. Fearn, C.A. Fischbein, M. Gaeta, B. Gardner, A. Golioto, A. Gork, L.E. Gray, D.L. Griffin, J.A. Gruskay, R.B. Halperin, M.S. Hogan, M.K. Ikeda, L.R. Jayanthi, D.E. Karas (Surgery), S.J. Lavietes, M.A. Lee, J.C. Long, A. Matczuk, C. Menzies, J.L. Morgan, B.C. Natt, C.L. Patterson, H.J. Pierce, M.F. Robert, M.A. Sanyal, M. Seli, L. Semeraro, L.B. Shader, M. Sharkey (Orthopaedics & Rehabilitation), R.J. Shea, E.C. Springhorn, J.M. Stein, L.E. Sude, C.P. Summers, S. Tsalbins, A. Vaezy, G.R. Wanerka, E. Wiesner, R.D. Windom, J. Wynne

Clinical Instructors P.M. Alvino, A. Antman, F. Beig, R.S. Boyarsky, C.A. Brown, K.R. Burke, R.S. Caplan, M.C. Caserta, A.M. Coughlin, E.S. Cuoco, M.R. Dillaway, R.G. Dorr, B.G. Freeman, K.Y. Goldberg, J.E. Harwin, S. Hassan, K.M. Hesse, B.A. Hillman, D.L. Idelson, J.C. Jennings, L. Kappus, H. Kipperman, J. Koziel, K. Koziol-Dube, E.M. Lawrence, F.M. Lobo, R. Lockhart, A.J. Maley, K. Mozny, C. Nicolosi, L. Pavlovic, M. Pouliot, R.F. Ramos (Medicine), R.C. Rastetter, A.L. Rodriguez, E.A. Romano, L.K. Rudich, J.C. Samuel, L.T. Siew, D.J. Springer, J.H. Stein, S.M. Storeygard, D.C. Torres, V.P. Tsuei, L. Visscher, L.M. Walby, L.A. Waldman, N.G. Wijesekera, M. Williams, J.L. Young, R.A. Zlotoff (Medicine)

Lecturers L. Alonso, K.M. Baker, S. Baum, A. Beitel, N.B. Brown, A.J. Carlson, J. Chinchilla-Karolicki, A.V. Cohen, M.C. DeLucia, B.E. Esmaili, D.B. Flanagan, S. Frank, M.H. Gad, L. Glassman-Wisnewski, L.L. Gould, E. Herz, A.M. Hoefer, C.M. Keanna, C.M. Kennedy, K. Kinsella, S.E. Kuhn, S. Kurian, B.M. Liebler, L.M. Marks, S.P. Martinello, P. Murtagh, R. Nolfo, J.E. O’Connor, K. Pae, E.N. Rice (Nursing), C.A. Rowan, Z.A. Scates, R. Seligson, M.J. Sheehan, S.J. Slattery, C.M. Smillie, K. Vassell, K. Wallis

MD 2175 (PEDS)/MD 2150 (OBGY), Primary Care and Psychiatry Clerkship This twelve-week integrated clerkship includes ambulatory internal medicine and psychiatry clinical components, as well as outpatient pediatrics and OB/Gyn. Students participate in one four-week full-time placement at a primary care practice in Connecticut and one four-week part-time placement, which co-occurs with a part-time psychiatry consult placement. The psychiatry component of the clerkship includes four weeks of full-time inpatient psychiatry, four weeks part-time consultation psychiatry, and eight half-days in an ambulatory psychiatry setting. This integrated clerkship emphasizes themes such as health promotion and disease prevention, social determinants of health, behavioral change, systems-based care, and management of chronic disease. Directors: W.N. Kernan, K.M. Wilkins

PEDS 128, Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Elective This two- or four-week elective provides a wide variety of experience in the diagnosis and management of malignant diseases and hematologic problems of infancy and childhood. The student functions as part of the inpatient service team and participates in the outpatient clinic three to four mornings each week. Weekly conferences include the multidisciplinary pediatric tumor conference, hemostasis rounds (jointly with medical hematology), a fellows conference, and weekly pediatric hematology/oncology patient management rounds. One student per block—either for a clerkship or an elective, not both—every two or four weeks. Prerequisite: Pediatric Clerkship. Director: F.D. Pashankar

PEDS 143/SURG 176, Pediatric Surgery Subinternship This subinternship provides an in-depth exposure to the broad spectrum of pediatric surgical problems. Specific attention is given to identifying the pediatric patient in crisis, a relevant skill whether or not the student pursues a career in surgery. Objectives include understanding the correction of major congenital anomalies, management of trauma, care of the critically ill child, and management of solid tumors. Experience includes in-depth exposure to the pediatric operating room, training in neonatal and pediatric critical care, and experience in the pediatric surgical outpatient clinic. The student is an integral part of the pediatric surgical team. Prerequisite: completion of third-year clerkships. One student every four weeks. Director: E.R. Christison-Lagay

PEDS 144, Pediatric Cardiology Elective This four-week elective encompasses all aspects of pediatric cardiology. The student is expected to make daily inpatient rounds in the PICU, NICU, and inpatient floors with the pediatric cardiology attending physician, fellow, and nurse practitioner. Observation in the pediatric cardiology catheterization laboratory and pediatric cardiothoracic operating room is encouraged. The student is also expected to attend the afternoon outpatient pediatric cardiology clinics and all scheduled pediatric cardiology conferences. One student every four weeks. Director: B.P. Weeks

PEDS 146, Pediatric Infectious Disease Elective Students participate in pediatric infectious disease rounds by presenting the case study of an inpatient whom they have examined to a group of faculty and fellows. Emphasis is placed on the correlation of the clinical problem and its practical management with principles of infectious epidemiology and clinical microbiology (bacteriology and virology). Consulting rounds are held daily. Teaching rounds in diagnostic microbiology are held four times a week. Weekly divisional rounds last approximately two hours. Students also attend the pediatric AIDS clinic. Prerequisite: Pediatric Clerkship or permission of the instructor. One student every four weeks. Director: R.S. Baltimore

PEDS 148, Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes Elective This four-week elective provides extensive exposure to various aspects of pediatric endocrinology, with an emphasis on disorders of growth and sexual development, thyroid function, diabetes (type 1 and type 2), obesity, and bone and mineral metabolism. The student participates primarily in the outpatient pediatric endocrinology and diabetes clinics, as well as the inpatient service. The rotation includes participation in weekly pediatric endocrinology conferences as well as conferences held jointly with the adult endocrinology service. One or two students every four weeks. Codirectors: A.D. Patel, S.A. Weinzimer

PEDS 152, Pediatrics Subinternship A four-week rotation during which senior medical students are considered the equivalent of interns and are directly responsible for the care of assigned patients under the supervision of resident and attending physicians. Students are assigned to one of the two general pediatric inpatient units at Yale-New Haven Hospital (Medicine/Cardiology and Short Stay). The rotation offers an opportunity to develop organizational skills and experience the pace of internship in a supportive environment. Emphasis is placed on being a good team member, taking ownership of one’s patients, and demonstrating improvement in intern skills (clinical reasoning, communication with patients/families, organization, prioritization, presentation, and efficiency) through incorporation of constructive feedback. Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of third-year Pediatric and Internal Medicine clerkships. One or two students every four weeks. Director: D.C. Hersh

PEDS 154, Pediatric Respiratory Pulmonary Elective Students are exposed to a wide variety of activities in the Section of Pediatric Respiratory Medicine. These include the evaluation and treatment of infants and children with acute and chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, bronchiolitis, pneumonia, aspiration syndromes, and obstructive sleep disorders. The emphasis is on learning how to assess respiratory dysfunction by physical exam and laboratory testing. The basics of mechanical ventilation are reviewed. Students rotate through both the inpatient and various outpatient services and specialty clinics, Pulmonary Function Laboratory, Exercise Stress Testing Lab, and Pediatric Sleep Center. Students are expected to participate in seminars, journal club, and patient rounds. In addition, students have the opportunity to experience one of only two CF Centers in the state of Connecticut offering a multidisciplinary team approach that provides state-of-the-art care of CF patients. One student every two or four weeks. Director: R.K. Gill

PEDS 155/EMER 155, Pediatric Emergency Medicine Elective Fourth-year students have the opportunity to evaluate and manage a broad range of acute medical and surgical complaints under direct attending supervision, including thirty-six clinical hours per week in the pediatric emergency department. Participation in teaching conferences and mock codes is required. One student every four weeks. Prerequisites: pediatric rotation, EPIC inpatient training, and EPIC ED e-learning. Director: P.L. Aronson

PEDS 307, Pediatric Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Elective (NBSCU) Students spend two weeks on the step-down service, followed by two weeks on the intensive care service. On each service students attend medical rounds and follow neonatal patients and write progress notes under close supervision. Students attend delivery room resuscitations and stabilizations, and prenatal consultations. On both services, students attend general and student-oriented educational conferences as well as radiology rounds. Students also pursue independent study on topics in neonatology and make brief presentations to the clinical team. Additional opportunities, such as attendance at outpatient developmental follow-up exams, are available to students based on interest. One student every four weeks. Directors: L.C. Johnston, S.M. Peterec

PEDS 314, Pediatric Critical Care Medicine Elective This four-week elective provides an opportunity for senior medical students to participate as members of the pediatric intensive care unit team. The student is directly responsible for the care of assigned patients under the supervision of pediatric residents, critical care fellows, and attending intensivists. A core curriculum composed of interactive talks on the major pediatric critical care topics is presented two to three times a week, as well as daily radiology rounds and a monthly morbidity and mortality conference. One student every four weeks. Director: K.G. Couloures

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Pharmacology

SHM B204, 203.785.4393

http://medicine.yale.edu/pharm

Professors K.S. Anderson, A.M. Bennett, Y. Cheng, J.R. Cooper (Emeritus), C.M. Crews (Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology), P.S. Dannies, B.E. Ehrlich, R.E. Handschumacher (Emeritus), R. Heimer (Epidemiology), R. Herbst (Medicine), J.R. Howe, L.K. Kaczmarek, E. Lolis, G. McMahon (Adjunct), A.C. Nairn (Psychiatry), M. Picciotto (Psychiatry), S. Rockwell (Therapeutic Radiology), R.H. Roth (Psychiatry), G. Rudnick, A.C. Sartorelli, J. Schlessinger (Chair), W.C. Sessa, S.G. Waxman (Neurology)

Associate Professors T. Boggon, D.A. Calderwood, M.P. DiGiovanna (Medicine), J.V. Eswarakumar (Orthopaedics & Rehabilitation), Y. Ha, M.E. Hodsdon (Laboratory Medicine), I. Lax, K.A. Martin (Medicine), E. Paintsil (Pediatrics), B.E. Turk

Assistant Professor J.N. Contessa (Therapeutic Radiology)

Senior Research Scientist J.R. Cooper

Associate Research Scientists R.P. Baumann, M. Brown, C.H. Calderwood, F. Chen, L. El Hassar, K.A. Grabinska, F. Guan, B. Ha, S. Hamill, R. Hu, P. Iyidogan, Z. Jiang, K.T. Kucera, L. Kuruvilla, W. Lam, H. Lee, S. Lee, X. Li, Z. Lin, J.W. Murphy, E. Park, P.G. Penketh, S. Raghavan, C. Rajagopal, D. Rajasekaran, A.V. Reshetnyak, A. Sachpatzidis, X. Shi, K. Shyam, L.P. Sousa, J. Srivastava, W. Tang, G. Wu, A.L. Wyler, P. Zhang, Y. Zhang, Y. Zhang, R. Zhu, Y. Zhu

Lecturers P. Klein, R.J. Levine (Medicine)

PHAR 502a/C&MP 630a/PATH 680a, Seminar in Molecular Medicine, Pharmacology, and Physiology Readings and discussion on a diverse range of current topics in molecular medicine, pharmacology, and physiology. The class emphasizes analysis of primary research literature and development of presentation and writing skills. Contemporary articles are assigned on a related topic every week, and a student leads discussions with input from faculty who are experts in the topic area. The overall goal is to cover a specific topic of medical relevance (e.g., cancer, neurodegeneration) from the perspective of three primary disciplines (i.e., physiology: normal function; pathology: abnormal function; and pharmacology: intervention). D. Nguyen, T. Boggon

PHAR 504a, Principles of Pharmacology This course covers the molecular mechanisms of therapeutics, which are presented in a conceptual framework to increase understanding but decrease memorization. Topics include (but are not limited to) receptor affinity, efficacy, multiple equilibria, pharmacokinetics, and toxicity; enzyme kinetics and inhibition, drug discovery and design; molecular basis of antimicrobial therapy, cardiology drugs, anticancer and antiviral therapies; and therapeutics for inflammatory disorders, asthma, and allergy. E. Lolis

PHAR 506a and b, Methods in Pharmacological Research (Rotations) Students work in laboratories of faculty of their choice. The period spent in each laboratory is one term. E. Lolis

[PHAR 521a/NSCI 521a, Neuroimaging in Neuropsychiatry I: Imaging Methods Not offered in 2015–2016]

PHAR 521b/NSCI 521b, Neuroimaging in Neuropsychiatry II: Clinical Applications Neuroimaging methodologies including Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) are rapidly evolving tools used to study the living human brain. Neuroimaging has unprecedented implications for clinical diagnosis, for assessment of drug efficacy, for determination of psychotropic drug occupancy, and for the study of pathophysiological mechanisms underlying neurologic and psychiatric disorders. The course is designed to provide an overview of the application of state-of-the-art neuroimaging methods to research in neurologic and psychiatric disorders. I. Esterlis, H. Blumberg, K.P. Cosgrove

PHAR 528a, Principles of Signal Transduction The regulation of intracellular signaling is of fundamental importance to the understanding of cell function and regulation. This course introduces the broad principles of intracellular signal transduction. More detailed lectures on specific intracellular signaling pathways are given in which students learn both the basic and most recent and cutting-edge concepts of intracellular signaling. Topics include regulation of signaling by protein phosphorylation, small G proteins, G-protein-coupled receptors, hormones, phospholipids, adhesion, and gasses. A.M. Bennett

PHAR 529b, Structural Pharmacology The goal of the course is to show students how concepts of structural biology are applied to areas of great importance in pharmacology such as protein kinases, proteases, cell surface receptors, integrins and other membrane-bound enzymes, and transporters and channels, and how these concepts facilitate drug development. Y. Ha, T. Boggon

PHAR 530b, Practical Applications in Structural Pharmacology This 0.5-credit course begins on February 24, joining PHAR 529b. The goal of the course is to show students how concepts of structural biology are applied to areas of great importance in pharmacology such as protein kinases, proteases, cell surface receptors, integrins and other membrane-bound enzymes, and transporters and channels, and how these concepts facilitate drug development. Y. Ha, T. Boggon

PHAR 550a/C&MP 550aU/ENAS 550aU/MCDB 550aU, Physiological Systems The course develops a foundation in human physiology by examining the homeostasis of vital parameters within the body, and the biophysical properties of cells, tissues, and organs. Basic concepts in cell and membrane physiology are synthesized through exploring the function of skeletal, smooth, and cardiac muscle. The physical basis of blood flow, mechanisms of vascular exchange, cardiac performance, and regulation of overall circulatory function are discussed. Respiratory physiology explores the mechanics of ventilation, gas diffusion, and acid-base balance. Renal physiology examines the formation and composition of urine and the regulation of electrolyte, fluid, and acid-base balance. Organs of the digestive system are discussed from the perspective of substrate metabolism and energy balance. Hormonal regulation is applied to metabolic control and to calcium, water, and electrolyte balance. The biology of nerve cells is addressed with emphasis on synaptic transmission and simple neuronal circuits within the central nervous system. The special senses are considered in the framework of sensory transduction. Weekly discussion sections provide a forum for in-depth exploration of topics. Graduate students evaluate research findings through literature review and weekly meetings with the instructor. E.L. Boulpaep, W.M. Saltzman

PHAR 560b/C&MP 560bU/ENAS 570bU/MCDB 560bU, Cellular and Molecular Physiology: Molecular Machines in Human Disease The course focuses on understanding the processes that transfer molecules across membranes at the cellular, molecular, biophysical, and physiological levels. Students learn about the different classes of molecular machines that mediate membrane transport, generate electrical currents, or perform mechanical displacement. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between the molecular structures of membrane proteins and their individual functions. The interactions among transport proteins in determining the physiological behaviors of cells and tissues are also stressed. Molecular motors are introduced and their mechanical relationship to cell function is explored. Students read papers from the scientific literature that establish the connections between mutations in genes encoding membrane proteins and a wide variety of human genetic diseases. E.L. Boulpaep, F.J. Sigworth

PHAR 580/C&MP 650/PATH 660, The Responsible Conduct of Research Organized to foster discussion, the course is taught by faculty in the Pharmacology, Pathology, and Physiology departments and two or three senior graduate students. Each session is based on case studies from primary literature, reviews, and two texts: Francis Macrina’s Scientific Integrity and Kathy Barker’s At the Bench. Each week, students are required to submit a reaction paper discussing the reading assignment. Students take turns leading the class discussion; a final short paper on a hot topic in bioethics is required. B.E. Ehrlich, D. Braddock

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Psychiatry

300 George Street, Suite 901, 203.785.2117

http://medicine.yale.edu/psychiatry

Professors G.K. Aghajanian (Emeritus), S.A. Ball, M.D. Bell, R.M. Berman (Adjunct), H. Blumberg, B.S. Bunney (Emeritus), T.D. Cannon (Psychology), K.M. Carroll, J.P. Comer (Child Study Center), D.C. D’Souza, L. Davidson, R.J. DiLeone, R.S. Duman, M.H. Ebert, J.E. Gelernter, D.C. Glahn, E.H. Griffith (Emeritus), C.M. Grilo, K.A. Hawkins, G. Heninger (Emeritus), J. Hirsch, R.A. Hoff, R.E. Hoffman, M.A. Hoge, S.C. Jacobs (Emeritus), H.G. Jarecki (Adjunct), R.D. Kerns, K.K. Kidd (Genetics), R.A. King (Child Study Center), T.A. Kirk (Adjunct), J.H. Krystal (Chair), M. Laruelle (Adjunct), J.F. Leckman (Child Study Center), P.J. Lombroso (Child Study Center), R.T. Malison, S. Martino, G.F. Mason (Diagnostic Radiology), C. Mazure, T.H. McGlashan (Emeritus), S. McKee, A.C. Nairn, S.S. O’Malley, G.D. Pearlson, I.L. Petrakis, M. Picciotto, M.N. Potenza, S.M. Powsner, D.M. Quinlan, D.E. Redmond, Jr., R.M. Rohrbaugh, R. Rosenheck, R.H. Roth, G. Sanacora, R.S. Schottenfeld, H.I. Schwartz (Adjunct), M.J. Sernyak, N. Sestan (Neurobiology), R. Sinha, W.H. Sledge, D. Small, D.L. Snow (Emeritus), M. Sofuoglu, S.M. Southwick, J.S. Strauss (Emeritus), J.R. Taylor, J.K. Tebes, D.F. Tolin (Adjunct), C.H. Van Dyck, F.R. Volkmar (Child Study Center), B.E. Wexler (Emeritus), S.W. Woods, K.A. Yonkers, H.V. Zonana

Associate Professors M. Alreja, L.M. Anez, S.R. Axelrod, M. Baranoski, K.L. Behar, R. Belitsky, Z. Bhagwagar (Adjunct), M.O. Bonarrigo, A. Buchanan (Adjunct), V.D. Calhoun (Adjunct), M.C. Chawarski, C. Chiles, C. Connell, J.M. Cook, N.L. Cooney, K.P. Cosgrove, C.A. Crusto, I.E. De Araujo, E. Diaz, N.C. Epperson (Adjunct), J.M. Fiszdon, I. Harpaz-Rotem, J.D. Iennaco (Nursing), S. Jordt (Adjunct), J. Kaufman, J.S. Kaufman, P.D. Kirwin, S. Krishnan-Sarin, M.M. Kurtz (Adjunct), H.B. Lee, C. Li, T.J. McMahon, P.T. Morgan, E.D. Morris (Diagnostic Radiology), M.A. Norko, D.A. Oren (Adjunct), M. Paris, C. Pittenger, A.N. Ponce, S.G. Resnick, M.I. Rosen, M. Rowe, V.H. Srihari, J.L. Steiner, M.C. Stevens (Adjunct), T.H. Styron, N.E. Suchman, T.P. Sullivan, G.D. Tamagnan (Adjunct), C. Tek, L.A. Trevisan, N. Ward, M.A. White, K.M. Wilkins

Assistant Professors C. Abdallah, N.A. Addy, K. Ahn, B.M. Anderson (Adjunct), A. Annamalai, E. Ansell, A. Anticevic, A. Arias, M. Assaf (Adjunct), A. Barkil-Oteo, D. Barry, A. Baskin-Sommers (Psychology), J.E. Beauvais, R.D. Beech, C.D. Bellamy, J.A. Brewer (Adjunct), E.R. Carr, I. Cavus (Adjunct), L.G. Chepenik, S. Corbera (Adjunct), P.R. Corlett, M. Day (Adjunct), M.E. Delphin, P.H. Desan, J.C. Deviva, N.A. Diaz, G.J. Diefenbach (Adjunct), C.C. Dike, L. Dorflinger, G. Dragoi, E.L. Edens, L.M. Edwards, J.A. Encandela, D. Epelbaum, I. Esterlis, D.C. Fehon, T.V. Fernandez (Child Study Center), E.H. Flanagan, A. Forray, D. Foster, H. Fox, L. Fucito, B. Fuehrlein, A. Garakani (Adjunct), K.A. Garrison, M.N. Goldenberg, D.M. Gordon, J.L. Goulet, S. Gupta, H. Hamid (Neurology), N. Hamlett, J.O. Hannestad (Adjunct), A.A. Heapy, K. Height (Adjunct), E. Hermes, D.M. Higgins (Adjunct), A.J. Holmes (Psychology), M.G. Hunt, T. Iheanacho, J.K. Johannesen, R. Kapoor, B. Kiluk, H. Kim, A.S. Klee, H. Kober, S.D. Kruger, J.F. Kulas, C.A. Kwan, D.M. LaPaglia, M. Leddy, R.F. Leeman, S. Madonick (Adjunct), C. Marienfeld, R.S. McWilliam (Child Study Center), R.A. Miller, C. Montross (Adjunct), P.M. Morrissey (Adjunct), S. Muvvala, M. Nakic, B. Narayanan (Adjunct), S. Parke, R.H. Pietrzak, D. Pilkey, J.M. Pollard, M. Prabhu, Z. Qayyum, M.E. Rabbitt Morean (Adjunct), E. Ralevski, M. Ranganathan, D.A. Ross, C. Sanislow (Adjunct), C.E. Sartor, J.J. Sellinger, M.A. Silva, A.A. Simen (Adjunct), P.D. Skosnik, P. Skudlarski (Adjunct), M.V. Smith, H.R. Steinberg, M.J. Strambler, T.S. Surti, J.L. Tondora, J. Tsai, T.C. VanDeusen, D. Vojvoda, N. Ward, A.H. Weinberger (Adjunct), A. Westphal, J. Xu, K. Xu, B. Yang, G. Yoon, H. Zhang, P. Zimbrean, L.D. Zimmerman (Child Study Center), Z. Zimolo, L. Zuo

Instructors G.A. Angarita-Africano, P.Y. Geha, L. Henry, G. Hermes, C.L. Olezeski, M. Steinfeld, J.L. Traxler, W.A. Williams

Senior Research Scientists G.K. Aghajanian, J.D. Elsworth, E.H. Griffith, G. Heninger, P.I. Jatlow (Laboratory Medicine), T.H. McGlashan, A. Papsun, B.E. Wexler

Research Scientists S.A. Castner, N.R. Driesen, A. Kaffman, R. Masheb, G.V. Williams

Associate Research Scientists L. Averill, I.M. Balodis, M. Banasr, R.D. Barnes, A.C. Black, D.L. Boggs, D.A. Cavallo, G.M. Chowdhury, A.D. Dager, K.S. DeMartini, M.Desai, A. Desrosiers, E.E. DeVito, M. Driscoll, C.H. Duman, A. Harper, A. Herman, V. Ivezaj, J.S. Jane, K.P. Jensen, W.J. Kasprow, G. Kong, R. Liu, X. Luo, D. Matuskey (Diagnostic Radiology), M. Mitchell, J.A. Noah, E.E. O’Brien, L. Oberleitner, K.M. Olumide, S.L. Quick, D. Rodriguez-Moreno, B. Schweinsburg, M.D. Seay, D.J. Sells, D. Seo, P. Smith, E.A. Stefanovics, S.I. Tarbox, J.R. Trinko, M.G. Veldhuizen, L. Wei, E. Wohleb, K.M. Wrocklage, M. Wu, M. Xu, X. Zhang, S. Zhang

Clinical Professors D.N. Berg, D.A. Carlson, D.G. Greenfeld, L.L. Harkness, D. Laub, J. Phillips, L.W. Reiser, H.L. Ruben, L.D. Siggins, J.L. Young

Associate Clinical Professors J. Allison, V.A. Altshul, S. Boltax-Stern (Child Study Center), J.J. Ciarcia, V. Coric, J. De Figueiredo, J. Geller, R.L. Goettsche, O.F. Hills, R.J. Hoffnung, D. Johnson, D. Koenigsberg (Child Study Center), C.C. Kovel, K. Liebmann, K.M. Long, J.S. Lustman, M. Mandelkern, S. Mohamed, C.A. Morgan, M.S. Okasha, R.B. Ostroff, E.A. Perlswig (Child Study Center), R. Peters, S.H. Phillips, E.R. Ryan, S.J. Schreiber, A.P. Siegal, E.W. Snyder, R. Stern, R.R. Tampi, A.P. Thies (Child Study Center), P. Van Wattum (Child Study Center)

Assistant Clinical Professors L.J. Adams, A.C. Adis, A.T. Albrecht, A.M. Almai, J.A. Anderson, T. Armah, B. Arnaout, S.R. Atkins, R. Aziz, J. Ballew, A.L. Balter, J.A. Barber, L.C. Barr, M.V. Barrios, G.A. Bassett, B.R. Becker, E. Becker-Dunn, B.A. Beenken, F. Begum, M. Beitel, J.G. Bejarano, T. Belliveau, C.C. Bemis, S. Bender, D.E. Bendor, E.H. Berger, R.L. Bergeron, T. Bergherr, L.A. Blakley, Y.S. Blanco, D. Boltas, D. Bond, K.F. Bonese, Z. Boutaeva, D.M. Brandt, D. Brockett, T.E. Brown, J. Bullock, A. Buonopane, I. Burgos-Chapman, R. Casey, L.I. Chaikovsky, A. Chang, J. Charney, J.J. Chaudhary, J.R. Check, A.S. Cheng, D.E. Ciancimino, T.A. Cipriano, J.C. Cleves-Bayon, J.C. Cline, J.T. Collins (Child Study Center), M.L. Conroy, E.C. Cook, P.R. Correa, C.D. Couch, K. Croce, L.W. Cross, A. Crutchfield, W.F. Dailey, S. De Asis, S.E. Decker, D. Deegan, C.M. Demaio, R.S. Denkin, D. Dicello, N.S. Downs, V.M. Dreisbach, S.M. Drew, B.A. Duncan, C.G. Edelen, J.J. Erdos, R.D. Fallot, L. Fenton, S. Feuerstein, J.F. Fickes, P.L. Filip, S. Finkelstein, D.A. Fisk, K.A. Foran-Tuller, F.G. Fortunati, P.A. Fountain, C.A. Franco, M.I. Frankel, L.M. Frantsve, A. Franz, E.R. Frazer, R. Freeman, T.A. Freeman, C.C. Frick, D. Fried, G.F. Fuller, M.S. Gandelman, J. Gaskins, T. Glinberg, L.I. Goldstein, S.E. Gomez-Luna, L.R. Greene, A. Grier, C.S. Grove, L.B. Grunebaum, H. Gunduz-Bruce, D.D. Hawkins, G.A. Henry, S.R. Hill, M. Hillbrand, K. Holtzman, J.M. Horowitz, D.D. Jacobson, N. Jain, M. Jean-Baptiste, M.M. Jernigan, P. Joksovic, R.R. Kaminsky, A. Kaner, M. Kang, P. Kelly, K.G. Kennedy, K.E. Kerfoot, B. Kerner, S. Khan, S. Kidd, B. Klink, B.E. Knox, F.E. Koerner, A. Krasner, R.E. Kravitz, J. Kremer, J. Kurt, A. Lamba, H.M. Lankenau, T. Latif, K.M. Lazzarini, B. Lee, N.E. Legow, R.C. Lewis, S.V. Lewis, H.J. Lin, A.L. Lipschutz, H.G. Lizcano, D.B. London, J. Lopez, C. Lozano, H. Lubin, C.L. Lukens, B.F. Marcus, C.A. Markle, R. Marotta, S.L. Matlin, R.W. McCleary, B.B. McConnell, N.C. Mellos, S. Meshberg-Cohen, R.M. Meyer, S.J. Migdole, R.M. Milstein, A.P. Morais, V.R. Morrow, F.C. Mueller, P.V. Mulinski, D.S. Mundy, J. Myer, E.D. Nasper, M.P. Nespoli, J. Nields, F.J. Ninivaggi (Child Study Center), P. Noulas, D.O. Nudel, C.J. Oleskey, N.D. Olson, A.G. Oren, S. Ottenheimer, R.M. Ownbey, M.V. Pantalon (Emergency Medicine), J.F. Pelletier, F. Perepletchikova, H.V. Phan, J. Poling, J.F. Poll (Child Study Center), M.L. Prevey, J. Rakfeldt, I.S. Rathbone, D.R. Rau, N. Reddy, M.D. Rego, A. Resnick, S.A. Riccardi, G. Richardson, J.E. Robinson, L. Robinson, S.H. Rodrigues, M. Rodriguez, B.S. Rothschild, M.P. Roy, N. Roy, R. Rubin, S. Rubin, D.S. Russell, J.A. Sabbatino, N. Sahay, S. Salant, K.M. Salisbury, C. Sanders, K.A. Sanders, L.C. Sanfilippo, A.P. Sawyer, J.O. Schechter, C.J. Schmidt, J.L. Scott, J.P. Seibyl (Diagnostic Radiology), K.A. Sevarino, M.A. Shamsi, B.C. Shelby, J.T. Shelton, R. Shenouda, J.K. Shepard, D.E. Sholomskas, S.H. Silverstein, M.N. Spann, M.F. Sperrazza, A.D. Spivack, D.A. Stayner, W.A. Stewart, M. Stitelman, T. Straun, K. Subramanyam, D.C. Tate, E.S. Tek, C. Tenny, A.N. Tessler, S.E. Thomas, K.M. Tie, B. Tobin, K. Trueblood, M. Tupper, J.J. Vanderploeg, P. Vanderploeg, D.C. Vogel, J. Walia, R.S. White, M.L. Whitson, E.M. Wilson, A.M. Winkler, C.V. Wiseman, J. Wolf, P. Wupperman, C.M. Young, W. Zito, L. Zonana

Clinical Instructors S. Agrawal, E.G. Ahlert-Smith, F. Appah, M. Bailey, N.M. Campo, V.V. Carvalho, R.L. Cohen, D.H. David, J.E. Farber, D.J. Flanigan, E. Garcia-Aracena, C. Grazia, M.C. Grenough, C.M. Hunnicutt, R.L. Kieran, W. Levy, F. Lopez, N.M. Lustman, M. Miglani, R. Plant (Child Study Center), P.G. Rao, J.N. Rascati, S.J. Rathi, M.M. Reyes, S.D. Romano, D. Sebastian, M.F. Shaw, S.J. Sokol, D.J. Suscovich, M.B. Vollmar, E. Weiss

Lecturers C. Atkins, C.M. Barber, J.L. Barron, L.E. Bedregal, R.H. Berger, S. Berman (Emeritus), D.A. Berv, D.S. Bialos (Emeritus), C. Conrad, H.F. Crabbe, M. Cruza-Guet, G.H. Davis, A.R. Demac, C.E. Desmond, P.J. Dileo, P.A. Dillon, M. Emmanuel, C. Feldman (Emeritus), V.C. Girard, P.B. Goldblatt (Emeritus), S.G. Goodson, J.B. Gordon, K. Grady (Emeritus), G. Greenberg, F. Grossman, E.G. Grottole (Emeritus), C. Gulrajani, M.J. Honsberger, S.S. Horowitz (Emeritus), S.J. Houlding, D. Howe, C. Jean, M.A. Kalacznik, A. Kalafa, J.P. Kimmel, B.C. Klein, R.H. Klein, J. Klugman, A.S. Koleszar, K.K. Krusong, A.L. Labruzza, L. Lager, L.M. Lothstein, L.M. Madden, J.J. Magnavita, R.B. Makover, K. Marcus, A. Massa, A.W. Meisler, D.M. Mender, J.H. Meyer, J. Meyers, M.L. Mitchell, N.V. Mohatt, D.C. Moore, M. Moscarelli, K.F. Nuro, M.J. Orlosky, J.M. Palumbo, H.R. Pearsall (Emeritus), J. Pelletier, E. Peters, J.M. Pisciotta, S.J. Purcell, S. Ravven, P. Rehmer, W. Reich, E. Renaud, J. Richman, C.E. Riordan (Emeritus), E.B. Rubin, D.K. Sakheim, S.L. Satel, M.N. Savage, J.M. Schnitt, A.J. Sholomskas, R. Sirken, G.H. Sirkin, P.F. Thomas, B. Toll, P.J. Whang, C. Yang, H. Yarosh, J.R. Zigun

MD 2075 (Psychiatry)/MD 2050 (IM), Primary Care and Psychiatry Clerkship This twelve-week integrated clerkship includes ambulatory internal medicine and psychiatry clinical components, as well as outpatient pediatrics and OB/Gyn. Students participate in one four-week full-time placement at a primary care practice in Connecticut and one four-week part-time placement, which co-occurs with a part-time psychiatry consult placement. The psychiatry component of the clerkship includes four weeks of full-time inpatient psychiatry, four weeks part-time consultation psychiatry, and eight half-days in an ambulatory psychiatry setting. This integrated clerkship emphasizes themes such as health promotion and disease prevention, social determinants of health, behavioral change, systems-based care, and management of chronic disease. Directors: W.N. Kernan, K.M. Wilkins

Psychiatry 203, Psychiatry Inpatient Elective (CMHC) This elective includes intensive work with inpatients who suffer from major psychiatric disorders with or without substance abuse. Emphasis is on assessment, acute treatment, and arrangement of continuing care in the community. The subintern functions as an integral member of a multidisciplinary treatment team. Clinical research participation is encouraged. Opportunities are available to explore special areas of interest (e.g., forensics, psychopharmacology, administration) with CMHC faculty. Prerequisite: Psychiatry 106. Open to fourth-year students only. One student every four weeks. Director: R.M. Rohrbaugh; R.D. Beech, S. Elsamra

Psychiatry 206, Law and Psychiatry Elective This elective affords opportunities for third- and fourth-year students to observe and participate in “competency to stand trial” evaluations with a clinical team that makes these assessments at the New Haven Correctional Center. In addition, they may attend Law School classes with students who represent psychiatric patients, observe civil commitment procedures, and attend probate court hearings as well as the criminal proceedings in local New Haven Superior Courts. Students attend work seminars where case evaluations and write-ups are discussed and prepared, and read appropriate legal cases and psychiatric literature. Students may be able to participate in parts of evaluations of insanity defense, custody determination, and other forensic issues. They attend the Law and Psychiatry seminar during their rotation. Prerequisite: Psychiatry 106. One student every four weeks. Director: R.M. Rohrbaugh; H.V. Zonana

Psychiatry 209, Substance Abuse Elective An elective clinical training experience in substance abuse for third- and fourth-year students. The primary training site is the Outpatient Service at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System (VACHS) in West Haven. This experience is an intensive one in which students work closely with addicted patients with chronic mental illness. Students interested in learning about medical detoxification from alcohol and/or opiates may participate in an intensive two-week elective in the Ambulatory Detoxification Clinic at the VACHS. Students learn about the evaluation and treatment of alcohol withdrawal and detoxification. Patients with benzodiazepine and opiate dependence are also treated in this clinic. Prerequisite: Psychiatry 106. One student every four weeks. Director: R.M. Rohrbaugh; VACHS faculty: S.M. Drew, I.L. Petrakis

Psychiatry 210, Psychiatry Inpatient Elective (YNHH/YPH) This elective includes intensive work with patients who suffer from major psychiatric disorders and range in age from college students to middle age. Emphasis is on assessment, acute treatment, and arrangement of post-discharge follow-up care in the community. The student is an advanced clerk functioning as a member of the multidisciplinary treatment team, taking on primary clinician and psychiatric/medical responsibilities for patients under the supervision of senior clinicians. The elective is given on the inpatient service at the Yale-New Haven Psychiatric Hospital; clinical research and outpatient involvement may be options. Open to fourth-year students only. Prerequisite: Psychiatry 106. One student every four weeks. Director: R.M. Rohrbaugh; R.M. Milstein, R.B. Ostroff

Psychiatry 211, Clinical Neuroscience Research Unit Elective This elective offers senior medical students the opportunity to work closely with a variety of patients who are hospitalized during their participation and treatment in research protocols. The Clinical Neuroscience Research Unit (CNRU) is a thirteen-bed inpatient ward with associated outpatient clinics and basic science laboratories on the third floor of the Connecticut Mental Health Center (CMHC). Supervised implementation of novel psychopharmacology, exposure to multiple aspects of clinical and basic science research, and in-depth experience with individual and group psychotherapies are educational aspects of this elective. Patients’ diagnostic categories include depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, schizophrenia, cocaine abuse, substance abuse, and psychiatric genetics. Prerequisite: Psychiatry 106. One student every four weeks. Director: R.M. Rohrbaugh; M. Bloch, G.A. Angarita-Africano

Psychiatry 212, Mood Disorders and Neuromodulation Elective (ECT and TMS) This elective offers senior medical students the opportunity to learn about neuromodulation techniques in the treatment of mood disorders, more specifically, by using electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and repetitive transcranial stimulation (TMS). Students learn the theoretical basis for the use of ECT and TMS, among other neuromodulation techniques, in the treatment of mood disorders. They learn indications and contraindications to treatment, the process of evaluation of patients prior to and during treatment (including use of standardized depression rating scales), how to monitor for complications and side effects to treatment, and the latest research in the field. Students work closely with psychiatry attending physicians and residents at the VA in the evaluation of patients referred for ECT and TMS, and have the opportunity for supervised participation in the performance of these treatments. Patient population includes veterans of all ages with a variety of psychiatric conditions, including mood disorders with comorbid anxiety and substance use disorders. Prerequisite: Psychiatry 106. One student every four weeks. Director: R.M. Rohrbaugh; VACHS faculty: C.G Edelen, S. Khan, K.M. Wilkins, D.L. Boggs

Psychiatry 234, Adolescent Psychiatry Elective The purpose of this elective is to provide fourth-year medical students interested in child and adolescent psychiatry and/or adolescent medicine an experience in working with adolescents presenting with acute psychiatric illness. The elective is based on the adolescent inpatient unit at Yale-New Haven Psychiatric Hospital, a short-term fifteen-bed unit serving patients aged 12–18. Students gain exposure to a diverse patient population with severe mood, psychotic, behavioral, and/or substance use disorders, as well as begin to understand the intricacies of working with families and systems providing care for adolescents with significant emotional and/or behavioral disturbances. Teaching activities include daily rounds and weekly case conferences. Prerequisite: Psychiatry 106. One student every four weeks. Director: R.M. Rohrbaugh; Z. Qayyum, H.J. Kim

Psychiatry 238, Early Psychosis Elective (STEP Clinic) STEP (Specialized Treatment Early in Psychosis) is a multidisciplinary team-based treatment for individuals presenting early in the course of a psychotic illness. This clinic offers unique opportunities in the assessment and treatment of a population that is difficult to access in other clinical settings. Students have the opportunity to observe structured research assessments and interpretation of these scales in light of careful clinical follow-up. Given the diagnostic and prognostic heterogeneity of illnesses presenting with psychosis, this experience provides the opportunity to develop clinical expertise in diagnosis and management of a range of mental health issues. The enriched treatment includes cognitive-behavioral group therapy, family psycho-education groups, and cognitive remediation in addition to vocational support with a focus on rapidly reintegrating patients back to age-appropriate social, educational, and employment goals. Students have the opportunity to observe or participate in any of these treatments. The multidisciplinary and pluralistic nature of the intervention presents a rich opportunity to participate in collaborative care with other mental health disciplines. Students can also participate in regular seminars sponsored by the STEP and PRIME (Prevention through Risk Identification, Management, and Education) clinics. The latter is a research clinic focused on prodromal psychosis. Site: Connecticut Mental Health Center (CMHC). Scholarship: STEP is designed as a service delivery model with a built-in observational cohort and experimental pragmatic randomized controlled trial. Students are invited to take an active role in the various domains of scholarship including community and clinician education efforts, publication, and learning about clinical research design. This is a supplemental experience that must be paired with a main inpatient placement at CMHC or Yale-New Haven Psychiatric Hospital. Prerequisite: Psychiatry 106. Open to fourth-year students only. One student every four weeks. Director: R.M. Rohrbaugh; V.H. Srihari (clinic director), J.M. Pollard (project director and family interventions coordinator, STEP clinic), C. Tek (program director, Psychosis Team), L.C. Hyman (team leader, Psychosis Team), S.W. Woods (director, PRIME clinic), J. Saksa (CBT coordinator, STEP clinic), B. Walsh (clinical coordinator, PRIME clinic)

Psychiatry 301, Psychiatry Inpatient Subinternship (CMHC) Intensive work with inpatients who suffer from major psychiatric disorders with or without substance abuse and who have significant social challenges often including lack of access to stable housing, work, and health insurance. Emphasis is on assessment, acute treatment, and arrangement of continuing care in the community. The student functions as an integral member of a multidisciplinary treatment team and serves as the primary clinician for four to five patients. The subinternship occurs on the inpatient service (4th floor) of the Connecticut Mental Health Center (CMHC). Prerequisite: Psychiatry 106. One student every four weeks, May through October only. Director: R.M. Rohrbaugh; R.D. Beech, S. Elsamra

Psychiatry 302, Psychiatry Inpatient Subinternship (YNHH, WS-2) Intensive work with patients who suffer from major psychiatric disorders and range in age from college students to middle age. Most patients have access to health insurance or have Medicare and/or Title XIX. Emphasis is on assessment, acute treatment, and arrangement of post-discharge follow-up care in the community. The student is an advanced clerk functioning as a member of the multidisciplinary treatment team, taking on primary clinician and psychiatric/medical responsibilities for patients under the supervision of senior clinicians. The subinternship occurs on the general adult inpatient service at the Yale-New Haven Psychiatric Hospital. Prerequisite: Psychiatry 106. One student every four weeks, May through October only. Director: R.M. Rohrbaugh; R.B. Ostroff, R.M. Milstein

Psychiatry 325/CHLD 325, Child Study Center Psychiatry Elective The aim of this elective is to provide the student with an intensive experience in infant, child, and adolescent psychiatry. The curriculum includes assessments of normal development and psychopathology in childhood, treatment methods, and research in major disorders of childhood. Students are active team members of the Children’s Psychiatric Inpatient Service (CPIS) and the consultation service to the pediatric wards of Yale-New Haven Hospital and can take advantage of the wide range of ongoing seminars, conferences, and clinical services in place at the Child Study Center. Teaching methods include seminars, conferences, field observations, ward rounds, and practicals selected by the student following consultation with the director of medical studies and the Child Study Center. One student every four weeks. Directors: A.S. Martin, R.M. Rohrbaugh

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LEPH 210, 203.785.2867

http://publichealth.yale.edu

Professors S. Aksoy, D. Albanes (Adjunct), F. Altice (Medicine), W.A. Andiman (Pediatrics), M.Y. Armstrong (Emeritus), R.S. Baltimore (Pediatrics), M.L. Bell, S. Bernstein (Emergency Medicine), M.B. Bracken, E.H. Bradley, R. Bucala (Medicine), S.H. Busch, M. Cappello (Pediatrics), E.B. Claus, P.D. Cleary (Dean), L. Dembry (Medicine), V.T. DeVita (Medicine), P. Diggle (Adjunct), J. Dovidio (Psychology), A.B. Du Bois (Emeritus), R. Dubrow, D.A. Fiellin (Medicine), E. Fikrig (Medicine), D. Fish (Emeritus), H.P. Forman (Diagnostic Radiology), G. Friedland (Medicine), A.P. Galvani, A. Gerber (Political Science), T.M. Gill (Medicine), E.L. Grigorenko (Child Study Center), C.P. Gross (Medicine), R. Heimer, W.J. Hierholzer (Emeritus), T.R. Holford, S.M. Horwitz (Emeritus), J.R. Ickovics, M.L. Irwin, J.F. Jekel (Emeritus), A.C. Justice (Medicine), E.H. Kaplan (School of Management), A.I. Ko, H.M. Krumholz (Medicine), Q. Lan (Adjunct), B.P. Leaderer, L.S. Levin (Emeritus), E.D. Louis (Neurology), H. Lu (Adjunct), R.W. Makuch, L.E. Marks, L.C. Mayes (Child Study Center), R. McCorkle (Nursing), D. McMahon-Pratt, I. Miller (Pediatrics), A.D. Paltiel, C.S. Panter-Brick (Anthropology), C.L. Patton (Emeritus), P.N. Peduzzi, R. Perez-Escamilla, E. Pinker (School of Management), J.R. Powell (Ecology & Evolutionary Biology), M.G. Reis (Adjunct), H.A. Risch, R. Rosenheck (Psychiatry), N. Rothman (Adjunct), N.H. Ruddle (Emeritus), M.B. Russi (Medicine), P. Salovey, N.G. Saravia (Adjunct), M.J. Schlesinger, E.D. Shapiro (Pediatrics), J.L. Sindelar, D.L. Snow (Psychiatry), J.T. Stitt (Emeritus), J.A. Stolwijk (Emeritus), J.K. Tebes (Psychiatry), G.H. Tignor (Emeritus), M.E. Tinetti (Medicine), C. Tschudi, V. Vasiliou, K.A. Yonkers (Psychiatry), H. Yu (Adjunct), D. Zelterman, H. Zhang, H. Zhao

Associate Professors H.G. Allore (Medicine), M.S. Bogucki (Emergency Medicine), T. Cohen, J.L. Davis, M.M. Desai, A.T. Dewan, M.A. Diuk-Wasser (Adjunct), J. Dziura (Emergency Medicine), D.A. Esserman, J.J. Hoh, T. Kershaw, K. Khoshnood, B. Levy, J.H. Lichtman, H. Lin, S. Ma, X. Ma, I.M. Nembhard, L.M. Niccolai, J.E. Pachankis, E. Paintsil (Pediatrics), A. Papachristos (Sociology), M.M. Pettigrew, J.S. Ross (Medicine), M.N. Smith (Medicine), A.N. Sofair (Medicine), N.S. Stachenfeld (Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences), R. Stolzenberg-Solomon (Adjunct), J. Townsend, M.A. White (Psychiatry), Y. Zhu

Assistant Professors R. Almeling (Sociology), P. Aronow (Political Science), X. Chen, M.M. Ciarleglio, Z.N. Cooper, F.W. Crawford, N.C. Deziel, A.S. Friedman, N.L. Hawley, A. Jukic, D.E. Keene, J. Ma (Adjunct), J.E. Monin, C.D. Ndumele, S. Parikh, V.E. Pitzer, J. Schwartz, F.M. Shebl, M.V. Smith (Psychiatry), S. Wang, Z. Wang, J.L. Warren, D.M. Weinberger, R. Yaesoubi, B. Zhou

Senior Research Scientists A. Caccone (Ecology & Evolutionary Biology), B. Cartmel, J.E. Childs, L. Curry, A.J. Davidoff, D. Fish, R. Gueorguieva, P.J. Krause, L.E. Munstermann, N.H. Ruddle

Research Scientists N. Abdala, G.M. Attardo, Y. Chen, S.D. Cunningham, F. Dai, J.F. Gent, B.A. Jones, N.G. Kolev, L. Lu, M.L. Ndeffo Mbah, N. Sun, B.L. Weiss

Associate Research Scientists J.A. Alfaro-Murillo, R.C. Barbour, M. Brault, E. Buta, S.K. Calabrese, L. Calvocoressi, M.E. Canavan, K. Duffany, D.P. Durham, L.M. Ferrucci, S. Gaffney, L.E. Grau, L. Hou, A.J. Hromi-Fiedler, H. Huang, R. Josyula, M.J. Kane, T.C. Kyriakides, E.C. Leifheit-Limson, V.L. Patterson, M.J. Stolar, R. Wang, Z. Wang, E.A. Wunder, D. Yamin, C.W. Yeckel, X. Yu

Clinical Professors J.B. Borak, J.L. Hadler

Associate Clinical Professors M.L. Cartter, D. Shenson, H. Wang

Assistant Clinical Professors D. Brackney, S. Geballe, P.D. Guarino, A.M. Miller, L.E. Sosa, M. Wininger, H. Zhang

Clinical Instructors D.L. Humphries, J.E. Rawlings

Lecturers E. Anderson, J.F. Anderson, D.D. Aye, T.J. Balcezak (Medicine), M. Booss, M.P. Borgstrom, E.A. Bortnichak, M.M. Callaway, P.F. Canny, G.L. Capozzalo, B. Cartmel, G. Charnley, J.E. Childs, K.H. Clark, H. Cohen (Medicine), L. Curry, R. D’Aquila, D.A. D’Atri, M.G. Dale, A.S. Darefsky, H.G. Dove, J.D. Dunn, A.J. Durante, B.T. Fenton, C. Fields, B. Fontes, S.D. Geballe, W.A. Gillespie, G.L. Ginsberg, M.K. Gusmano, J.F. Jekel, B. Jennings, B.A. Jones, M. Klein, P.J. Krause, S. Kumar, M. Lee, L.S. Levin, D. Li, E.L. Linnander, L.G. Marc, J.A. Mattera, Z. McNatt, S.M. Merz, L.M. Mueller, J.M. Mullen, E. O’Keefe, J.E. Otero, C. Petit, B. Schachtel, J.C. Scheeren, R.L. Skolnik, M. Skonieczny, M.D. Slade (Medicine), J.P. Smith, S.S. Spangler, J.A. Sparer, R.S. Stahl (Surgery), D.E. Stevens, J.A. Stolwijk, M.H. Stowe (Medicine), K.M. Talbert-Slagle, P.H. Van Ness (Medicine), B.L. Weiss, C.W. Yeckel, K.M. Yousey-Hindes, J.A. Zaccagnino

The nationally accredited Yale School of Public Health (YSPH) offers a wide variety of courses across several departments. Many of these are also available for medical student enrollment. For information on courses and registration procedures, contact the YSPH Registrar’s Office.

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Surgery

FMB 102, 203.785.2697

http://yalesurgery.org

Professors J.J. Abrahams (Diagnostic Radiology), S. Ariyan, L.M. Bartoshuk (Emeritus), S. Bokhari (Diagnostic Radiology), M.G. Caty, A. Dardik, K.A. Davis, F.C. Detterbeck, S.J. Dudrick (Emeritus), J.A. Elefteriades, S.H. Emre, J.P. Geibel, B.G. Green, R.J. Gusberg, G.L. Hammond (Emeritus), G.M. Israel (Diagnostic Radiology), B. Kinder (Emeritus), P. Kirshbom, G.S. Kopf, D.R. Lannin, S.B. Leder, D.J. Leffell (Dermatology), A. Lofqvist (Adjunct), W.E. Longo, L.M. Manuelidis, D.C. Mulligan, D. Narayan, W. Nealon, J.A. Persing, J. Pollak (Diagnostic Radiology), S.H. Rosenbaum (Anesthesiology), W. Rosenblatt (Anesthesiology), R.A. Rosenthal, P.E. Rubin (Adjunct), R.R. Salem, J. Santos-Sacchi, T.P. Sarac, C.T. Sasaki, I.R. Schwartz (Emeritus), L.M. Scoutt (Diagnostic Radiology), Y.H. Son (Therapeutic Radiology), B. Sumpio, G. Tellides, J.G. Thomson, R.J. Touloukian (Emeritus), R. Udelsman (Chair), W.G. Yarbrough, D.D. Yuh

Associate Professors J.E. Aruny, D.J. Boffa, P.N. Bonde, T. Carling, C.H. Cha, A.B. Chagpar, R.A. Cowles, A. Duffy, R.N. Formica (Medicine), S. Hashim, M.H. Johnson (Diagnostic Radiology), A.W. Kim, S. Kulkarni, L.L. Maerz, A.A. Mangi, A. Maung, M.F. Perkal, M. Prasad (Pathology), L. Rizzolo, K.E. Roberts, M.I. Rodriguez-Davalos, M. Schilsky (Medicine), K. Schuster, D.M. Steinbacher

Assistant Professors A.F. Au, M. Barnes, B. Bhattacharya, M.S. Bianchi, L.M. Bow, G.G. Callender, E.R. Christison-Lagay, U.M. Darr, R. Decker (Therapeutic Radiology), H.A. Deshpande (Medicine), M.L. Dewar, H. Einarsdottir, J. Federico, B.E. Fortune (Medicine), S. Ghiassi, D. Han, N.R. Horowitz, H. Hsia, J. Indes, N. Isaeva, D.C. Johnson, B. Judson, G.J. Kaml, M. Karimi, S.A. Khan, B. Killelea, D. Kowalski (Pathology), S.L. Kwei, A.H. Liapakis (Medicine), S.M. Luczycki (Anesthesiology), F.Y. Lui, R. Manes, S. Mehra, E. Michaelides, G. Nadzam, C. Ochoa Chaar, D.E. Ozgediz, K. Pei, C.E. Quinn, V. Reddy, D.H. Stitelman, H.E. Tantawy (Anesthesiology), P.S. Yoo, N. Young, J. Yun, P. Zimbrean (Psychiatry)

Instructors A.T. Arndt, S. Larson, S. Sainathan, J. Salluzzo, I. Sucandy, D. Suissa

Research Scientists S. Ivanov, A. Ivanova, L. Song

Associate Research Scientists H. Bai, R. Korah, J. Malinowski, L. Qin, D.P, Vangeli, S. Zhong, J. Zhou, B. Ziganshin

Clinical Professors J.E. Fenn, J.F. Kveton, R.S. Stahl, E. Yanagisawa

Associate Clinical Professors N.A. Atweh, Z.N. Chicarilli, R.C. Fazio, K. Lee, R.A. Lowlicht

Assistant Clinical Professors D.I. Astrachan, S. Baker, P.A. Barcewicz, H. Cedarbaum, B.Y. Cha, W. Cholewczynski, R.W. DeNatale, T.G. Duplinsky, S.I. Friedman, S. Fusi, R. Garvey, R.T. Golia, N.A. Gordon, S. Gregg, R.H. Hirokawa, G.E. Horblitt, D.E. Karas, D.B. Keck, A.S. Kenler, J.C. Kirchner, D.J. Muller, S. Natkin, M.K. O’Brien, G. Opin, P.M. Opin, L.R. Otake, M.T. Pronovost, J.C. Salomon, R.F. Schlessel, M.J. Schpero, S. Shah, R.E. Steller, T.F. Sweeney, D.A. Tereb, S.C. Thornton, E.M. Vining, D. Wasson, M.H. Weinstein, J.M. Willett, K. Yanagisawa, K. Zuckerman

Clinical Instructors J.A. Arons, C.B. Beckman, R. Crombie, A. Czibulka, M. D’Agostino, K. Discepolo, P.L. Fortgang, A. Geirsson, E. Honigsberg, J. Kerner, T.H. Lesnik, C.J. Lovoulos, V. Nathan, H.F. Reilly, T. Takoudes

Lecturers L. Acton, B.C. Fichandler, H.H. Haversat, D.D. Hendrick, N.M. Hewitt, J. Hopper, R. Kohilakis, K. Le, V. Lee, J. Mendes, C. Powell, L. Romanelli, P.G. Sasaki, H.L. Warner

MD 2100 (SURG)/MD 2125 (EMER), Surgical Approach to the Patient This twelve-week integrated clerkship includes surgery (six weeks, general; three weeks, specialties) and emergency medicine (three weeks) clinical components. Throughout the clerkship students participate in integrated experiences that address themes of the OR experience such as perioperative care, emergency/trauma management, procedures, medical error and patient safety, and anesthesiology. Students also participate in a twelve-week mentoring program during the clerkship. Directors: L. Hile, A.W. Kim

SURG 123b, Biochemical and Metabolic Foundations of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery A course designed to provide in-depth understanding of the molecular events underlying the diverse clinical phenomena encountered in plastic surgery. Topics include fluid electrolyte metabolism in the burn patient, biochemistry and metabolism of collagen and its relation to scarring and connective tissue disorders, normal wound healing, and disorders of the same. Offered for four weeks during the spring term, two hours per week by arrangement. Limited to two fourth-year students. J.A. Persing

SURG 129, Cardiac Transplantation/Cardiac Assist Device Elective Intensive exposure to laboratory and clinical aspects of cardiac transplantation. Special emphasis on the relationship between ongoing laboratory studies and clinical practice in this field. Students are involved in the preoperative assessment of prospective transplant candidates, donor procurement, intraoperative management, and postoperative immunosuppression. One or two students every four weeks. Codirectors: A. Mangi, P. Bonde

SURG 130, Cardiac Surgery Subinternship Intensive exposure to preoperative and postoperative management of adult and pediatric cardiac surgical patients and to intraoperative conduct of surgical procedures, with active participation in the operating room and in regular conferences. Students attend regular seminars covering major areas of cardiac surgery with members of the faculty and may be required to present a seminar on a subject in cardiac surgery to faculty and resident staff. Prerequisite: completion of third-year clerkships. Maximum of four students every four weeks. Director: J.A. Elefteriades; S. Hashim, D. Yuh

SURG 131, Thoracic Surgery Subinternship The student is expected to be a valuable contributing team member during daily rounds, in the operating room, in the outpatient clinics, and at conferences. The majority of patients under the care of the thoracic surgery service include those with lung, esophageal, and mediastinal malignancies and infections, and many present both diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Students have the opportunity to understand the multidisciplinary approach toward the management of these complex patients. Interested students can also pursue clinical research projects and papers. Prerequisite: completion of third-year clerkships. One or two students every four weeks. Director: A.W. Kim

SURG 143, Surgical Critical Care Elective (YNHH) The surgical intensive care unit exposes the senior medical student to the day-to-day and minute-to-minute management of the critically ill surgical patient. The breadth of surgical disease, spanning all aspects of surgery, allows the student to understand the management of respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and renal failure. Advanced techniques in ventilatory management and state-of-the-art sepsis management are used. Prerequisite: completion of third-year clerkships. One student every four weeks. Director: L.L. Maerz

SURG 144, Trauma and Emergency General Surgery Subintership A four-week exposure to the urgent surgical care of the critically ill and injured. Students are exposed to the evaluation and management of patients with traumatic and general surgical emergencies. Prerequisite: completion of third-year clerkships. One or two students every four weeks. Director: F.Y. Lui

SURG 150, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Subinternship Students participate in the evaluation and reconstructive surgery of deformities of congenital, traumatic, and neoplastic origin. Students are exposed to patients in inpatient and outpatient settings as well as operating room experiences, supplemented by regular conferences. Prerequisite: completion of third-year clerkships. One or two students every four weeks. Director: A.F. Au; J.A. Persing

SURG 151, Gastrointestinal Surgery Subinternship This subinternship offers in-depth exposure to the surgical care of the stomach and intestines in the clinic, hospital, and operating room. Diagnosis and treatment procedures are coordinated with gastroenterologists, endoscopists, and cancer experts, with emphasis on the most successful surgery with the least pain, trauma, scarring, and recovery time. Prerequisite: completion of third-year clerkships. One student every four weeks. Codirectors: W.E. Longo, K.E. Roberts

SURG 152, Advanced Senior Seminar, General Surgery This is a weekly evening seminar series covering advanced and controversial topics in general surgery. Three one-hour sessions include dinner at faculty homes and run from October through February. Reprints of pertinent articles provided prior to each seminar. Staff

SURG 153, Otolaryngology Subinternship This clinical experience is independent of the third-year Surgery/Otolaryngology rotation and takes place on an individual basis. It includes operating room experience, ward responsibilities, and involvement in outpatient ENT. Prerequisite: completion of third-year clerkships. One or two students every four weeks. Codirectors: M.S. Bianchi, S. Mehra

SURG 159, Urology Subinternship Flexible program designed to provide in-depth exposure to urology specialty areas, including uro-oncology, minimally invasive (laparoscopic) urology, endo-urology, neuro-urology, female urology, and pediatric urology. Students are part of the urologic team and participate actively in the clinic, the OR, and on rounds. Prerequisite: at least six months of prior clinical training. One or two students every four weeks. Director: D. Singh

SURG 171, Vascular Surgery Subinternship A practical experience in the diagnosis and management of vascular disease, including pre- and postoperative care. The scope of the experience includes orientation to the noninvasive vascular diagnostic laboratory, outpatient care in the Yale Vascular Center, and inpatient management (including patients in the OR, ICU, and the vascular surgery unit). Prerequisite: completion of third-year clerkships. One student every four weeks. Director: J. Indes

SURG 172, Transplantation Surgery Subinternship This intensive clinical experience emphasizes the preoperative assessment, intraoperative care, and postoperative management of patients suffering end-stage organ system failure who are cared for by transplantation. Emphasis also includes the management of immunosuppressive medication regimens and the care of post-transplant problems. Prerequisite: completion of third-year clerkships. One student every four weeks. Director: S.H. Emre

SURG 174, Surgical Oncology Subinternship Intensive exposure to surgical aspects of the treatment of cancer in the clinic, hospital, and operating room. The interaction among surgery, medical oncology, and radiation therapy is experienced by following patients receiving multiple forms of therapy. Prerequisite: completion of third-year clerkships. One student every four weeks. Director: A.B. Chagpar

SURG 176/PEDS 143, Pediatric Surgery Subinternship This subinternship provides an in-depth exposure to the broad spectrum of pediatric surgical problems. Specific attention is given to identifying the pediatric patient in crisis, a relevant skill whether or not the student pursues a career in surgery. Objectives include understanding the correction of major congenital anomalies, management of trauma, care of the critically ill child, and management of solid tumors. Experience includes in-depth exposure to the pediatric operating room, training in neonatal and pediatric critical care, and experience in the pediatric surgical outpatient clinic. The student is an integral part of the pediatric surgical team. Prerequisite: completion of third-year clerkships. One student every four weeks. Director: E.R. Christison-Lagay

SURG 203, Otolaryngology Elective This elective provides exposure to the broad spectrum of otolaryngology and head and neck problems. Students spend time in both the operating room and various clinics, including otology, laryngology, pediatric otolaryngology, head and neck cancer, facial plastics, and sinus. Students are asked to grasp in detail the head and neck exam and to learn diagnostic techniques and procedures useful to all medical specialties. The schedule is flexible and allows students to choose to participate in operations and clinics of special interest to them. Ample opportunity is provided to interact with the faculty and to develop a mentor relationship. One or two students every two weeks. Codirectors: M.S. Bianchi, S. Mehra

SURG 204, General Surgery Elective (YNHH/SRC) Students become an integral part of the resident team, supervised by the chief resident and attending physicians on the general surgery service. Students participate in the management of general surgical inpatients, preoperative evaluations, and outpatient clinics. Students are expected to participate in all teaching conferences, Grand Rounds, and clinics, and to attend core curriculum conferences each week. The goal is to provide an educational experience that will be of value to students’ eventual practice, regardless of which specialty they enter. One student every four weeks. Director: G. Kaml

SURG 208, Burn Surgery Elective, Bridgeport Hospital This rotation provides intensive exposure to the care of the acutely burned patient: surgical and nonsurgical care, critical care, and outpatient wound care. Large burn injuries evoke the most severe critical illness known to medicine. Patients with such injuries are unstable for prolonged periods of time and require responsive and attentive critical care. The student participates in this care, including procedures performed in the burn intensive care unit. Assessment of burn depth and the prognosis for wound healing are often far from straightforward, and the student participates in this assessment process with the rest of the team, learning to gauge depth and prognosis via examination of multiple patients. Operative therapy for burns includes excisional debridement and often split-thickness skin grafting, but there are multiple choices to be made in providing optimal care to a particular patient. The student learns the rudiments of this decision-making process and is an active participant in all operations performed by the burn team. One student every four weeks. Director: A. Savetamal

SURG 209, Congenital Heart Surgery Elective Students actively participate in the diagnosis, treatment, and operative and postoperative management of patients with congenital heart disease. Daily rounds on adult and pediatric cardiothoracic patients. Students receive a large exposure to pediatric and adult surgical cardiac intensive care unit care. One or two students every four weeks. Director: P. Kirshbom; G.S. Kopf, M. Karimi

SURG 211, Surgical Critical Care Subinternship (VAMC/SICU) Students are assigned advanced clinical duties in the field of surgical critical care. Students spend time in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU), where they participate in the management of critically ill surgical patients, including general surgical, vascular, urologic, cardiothoracic, and neurosurgical patients. Topics covered include cardiopulmonary resuscitation, airway and ventilator management, fluid management, nutritional support, and the management of sepsis. Students can participate in all invasive procedures in the SICU, including bedside tracheostomy, percutaneous gastrostomy placement, bronchoscopy, and arterial and central venous catheter placement. Under the supervision of the intensive care attending physician, students are directly responsible for one to two critical care patients. Students present on rounds each day and assist in providing family and primary service communication. Limited to fourth-year students. Prerequisite: completion of third-year surgery and medicine clerkships. One student every two or four weeks. Director: M.F. Perkal

SURG 217, Endocrine Surgery Subinternship This elective exposes the student to in-depth clinical and surgical aspects of endocrine surgery. Special emphasis is placed on the multidisciplinary approach to the endocrine patient, understanding the laboratory and radiologic studies, cytopathology, biochemical analysis, preoperative stabilization of patients, intraoperative decision making, and postoperative follow-up and outpatient evaluation of patients. Technical skills are emphasized as well for students interested in improving their surgical hands. Prerequisite: completion of third-year clerkships. One or two students every four weeks. Director: G. Callender

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Therapeutic Radiology

HRT 140, 203.785.2956

http://radonc.yale.edu

Professors S.J. Baserga (Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry), Z. Chen, D.C. DiMaio (Genetics), P.M. Glazer (Chair), B.G. Haffty (Adjunct), S.A. Higgins, R. Nath, R.E. Peschel (Emeritus), K.B. Roberts, S. Rockwell (Emeritus), W. Rupp, R.J. Schulz (Emeritus), Y.H. Son (Emeritus), W.C. Summers, P. Sung (Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry), J.B. Sweasy, L.D. Wilson

Professor (Adjunct) of Research K. Low

Associate Professors D.J. Carlson, V.L. Chiang (Neurosurgery), R.H. Decker, J. Deng, M.S. Moran, F.A. Rogers, Z. Yun

Assistant Professors R.S. Bindra, J.N. Contessa, S. Damast, S.B. Evans, F. Guo, J.E. Hansen, Z.A. Husain, R.B. Jensen, K.L. Johung, S. Kamath, W. Liu, B. McGibbon, A.A. Patel, F. Su, J.B. Yu

Senior Research Scientist D.E. Brash

Associate Research Scientists R. Bahal, M. Kaushik, Q. Lin, Y. Lu, A. Narayan, S. Premi, A.G. Senejani, N. Tiwari

Clinical Professors D.E. Brash, N. Dainiak (Medicine)

Associate Clinical Professors F.S. Cardinale, J.G. Cardinale, P.M. Pathare

Assistant Clinical Professors J. Albanese, J.E. Bond, J.Y. Chung, C.A. Knowlton

Clinical Instructor A.K. Jain

Lecturers H.M. Lincoln, R. Vera

THER 101, Clinical Clerkship in Radiation Therapy A flexible program designed to introduce the medical student to radiation therapy. The biological and physical bases of radiation therapy, together with clinical practice and ongoing research. Clinical exposure to patients with malignant disease, with between ninety and one hundred ten treated daily in the department. The student takes part in departmental conferences, clinics, lectures, and individual teaching sessions. Limited to two students at any time. R.H. Decker and staff

THER 102, Clinical Radiobiology This course is designed to provide residents in radiation oncology with a comprehensive review of clinical radiobiology as it applies to the practice of radiation therapy. The course is open to residents and fellows in other disciplines interested in radiobiology as it applies to clinical oncology. The course participant attends approximately twenty lectures in clinical radiobiology, which are delivered throughout the academic year between September and June. Scheduling by arrangement with R.H. Decker

THER 201b, A Survey of Radiobiology A review of the interaction of radiation on living organisms, progressing from DNA damage to complex mammalian systems. Modern concepts in molecular biology and cell kinetics are emphasized in understanding the sequelae of this interaction and the mechanism by which the organism responds to the injury produced. Fourteen sessions. By arrangement with Radiobiology staff

THER 300, Radiation Oncology Elective A flexible program designed to introduce the student to radiation oncology. The biological and physical basis of radiation oncology, together with clinical practice and ongoing research. Clinical exposure to patients with malignant disease, with between seventy-five and one hundred patients treated daily in the department. The student takes part in departmental conferences, clinics, lectures, and individual training sessions. Maximum of three students every four weeks. Director: R.H. Decker

THER 305, Principles and Methods of Radiation Dosimetry A graduate-level course for physics students or medical students with a strong physics background who want to learn about radiation dosimetry as it applies to medical practice. Topics include X-ray spectra, ionization chambers, X-ray exposure and the roentgen, mass energy-absorption coefficients, the Bragg-Gray principle, stopping power and linear energy transfer, chemical dosimeters, instrumentation, and physical aspects of radiology. Approximately twenty hours of tutorial sessions. Scheduling by arrangement with instructor. R. Nath

THER 306, Laboratory Projects in Radiation Dosimetry Students are given problems that relate to and supplement long-term, ongoing radiation dosimetry projects within the department. Prerequisite: THER 305, or its equivalent. Scheduling by arrangement with instructor. R. Nath

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Urology

FMP 300, 203.737.6038

http://medicine.yale.edu/urology

Professors T.C. Chai, H.E. Foster, B. Lytton (Emeritus), D. Petrylak (Medicine), P. Schulam (Chair), R.M. Weiss

Associate Professors J.W. Colberg, L.M. Rickey

Assistant Professors R.S. Bercik (Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences), M.K. Guess (Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences), A.B. Hittelman, P.A. Kenney, C.R. Loose (Adjunct), P. Motamedinia, J.S. Rosoff, B.M. Shuch, D. Singh, P. Sprenkle, C.N. Walker

Instructor M.J. Whalen

Associate Research Scientists M. Lu, D.T. Martin, C.B. Nawaf, Y. Zheng (Engineering & Applied Science)

Assistant Clinical Professors P.A. Kraus, R.F. Stroup

Clinical Instructors J. Chang, J. Devanney, J.J. Williams

Urology electives are listed under the Department of Surgery.

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