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Courses Taught by Institute Faculty, 2013–2014

See the bulletins of the School of Music and the Divinity School for full course listings and degree requirements. Courses listed here may be cross-listed in other schools or departments. Information is current as of July 1, 2013. An updated list is available online at www.yale.edu/ism.

The letter “a” following the course number denotes the fall term; the letter “b” denotes the spring term.

Courses fulfilling the distribution requirements for Institute students pursuing the M.Div. are indicated with a letter representing the subject area: W (Worship), M (Music), and/or A (Visual Arts or Literature).

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Music Courses

MUS 506a–b, 606a–b, 706a–b, Lyric Diction for Singers 2 credits per term. A language course designed specifically for the needs of singers. Intensive work on pronunciation, grammar, and literature throughout the term. French, German, English, Italian, Russian, and Latin are offered in alternating terms. Faculty

MUS 509a–b, 609a–b, 709a–b, Art Song Coaching for Singers 1 credit per term. Individual private coaching in the art song repertoire, in preparation for required recitals. Students are coached on such elements of musical style as phrasing, rubato, and articulation, and in English, French, Italian, German, and Spanish diction. Students are expected to bring their recital accompaniments to coaching sessions as their recital times approach. Faculty

MUS 510b, Music before 1700 4 credits. An overview of music before 1700 within its cultural and social contexts. The goal of the course is knowledge of the repertoire representing the major styles, genres, and composers of the period. Course requirements include a midterm exam, two short papers, and a final exam. Markus Rathey

MUS 515a,b, 615a,b, 715a,b, 815a,b, Improvisation at the Organ 2 credits. Development of improvisatory skills at the keyboard. Jeffrey Brillhart

MUS 517b/REL 954b, Mary in the Middle Ages 4 credits. During the Middle Ages and the early Renaissance, Mary, mother of Christ, acquired several powerful, multifaceted identities: protector, intercessor, mediator, Theotokos (“God-bearer”), Queen of Heaven, unsurpassed model for both mothers and virgins. Throughout Europe the cult of Mary inspired a torrent of liturgical feasts, songs and motets, buildings and artifacts. The course explores the intimate interconnections among the music, texts, and materialities of the Virgin’s cult in Byzantine and Western Christianity. In a dialogue between music history and art history, students have the opportunity to study the cultural artifacts of their own discipline and to understand them in the context of their religious and cultural environment. (M, A) Markus Rathey, Vasileios Marinis

MUS 519a–b, 619a–b, 719a–b, 819a–b, Colloquium 1 credit per term. Participation in seminars led by faculty and guest lecturers on topics concerning theology, music, worship, and related arts. Required of all Institute of Sacred Music students. Martin D. Jean

MUS 522a–b, 622a–b, 722a–b, Acting for Singers 1 credit per term. Designed to address the specialized needs of the singing actor. Studies include technique in character analysis, together with studies in poetry as it applies to art song literature. Class work is extended in regular private coaching. Marc Verzatt

MUS 531a–b, 631a–b, 731a–b, Repertory Chorus—Voice 2 credits per term. A reading chorus open by audition and conducted by graduate choral conducting students. The chorus reads, studies, and sings a wide sampling of choral literature. Marguerite L. Brooks

MUS 532a–b, 632a–b, 732a–b, Repertory Chorus—Conducting 2 credits per term. Students in the graduate choral conducting program work with the Repertory Chorus, preparing and conducting a portion of a public concert each term. Open only to choral conducting majors. Marguerite L. Brooks

MUS 535a–b, 635a–b, 735a–b, Recital Chorus—Voice 2 credits per term. A chorus open by audition and conducted by graduate choral conducting students. It serves as the choral ensemble for four to five degree recitals per year. Marguerite L. Brooks

MUS 536a–b, 636a–b, 736a–b, Recital Chorus—Conducting 2 credits per term. Second- and third-year students in the graduate choral conducting program work with the Recital Chorus, preparing and conducting their degree recitals. Open to choral conducting majors only. Marguerite L. Brooks

MUS 537b, Collaborative Piano: Voice 2 credits. A course designed for pianists, focusing on the skills required for vocal accompanying and coaching. The standard song and operatic repertoire is emphasized. Sight-reading, techniques of transposition, figured bass, and effective reduction of operatic materials for the recreation of orchestral sounds at the piano are included in the curriculum. Ted Taylor

MUS 540a–b, 640a–b, 740a–b, Individual Instruction in the Major 4 credits per term. Individual instruction of one hour per week throughout the academic year, for majors in performance, conducting, and composition. Faculty

MUS 544a–b, 644a–b, 744a–b, Seminar in the Departmental Major 2 credits per term. An examination of a wide range of problems relating to the area of the major. Specific requirements may differ by department. At the discretion of each department, seminar requirements can be met partially through off-campus field trips and/or off-campus fieldwork, e.g., performance or teaching. Required of all School of Music students except pianists who take 533, 633, 733. Faculty

MUS 546a–b, 646a–b, 746a–b, Yale Camerata 2 credits per term. Open to all members of the University community by audition, the Yale Camerata presents several performances throughout the year that explore choral literature from all musical periods. Members of the ensemble should have previous choral experience and be willing to devote time to the preparation of music commensurate with the Camerata’s vigorous rehearsal and concert schedule. Marguerite L. Brooks

MUS 571a–b, 671a–b, 771a–b, Yale Schola Cantorum 1 credit per term. Specialist chamber choir for the development of advanced ensemble skills and expertise in demanding solo roles (in music before 1750 and from the last one hundred years). Enrollment required for voice majors enrolled through the Institute of Sacred Music. David Hill

MUS 594a,b, Vocal Chamber Music 1 credit. This performance-based class requires a high level of individual participation each week. Grades are based on participation in and preparation for class, and two performances of the repertoire learned. Attendance is mandatory. Occasional weekend sessions and extra rehearsals during production weeks can be expected. Students are expected to learn quickly and must be prepared to tackle a sizeable amount of repertoire. James Taylor

MUS 595a,b, 695b, Performance Practice for Singers 1 credit per term. Fall term: An introduction to the major issues of historically informed performance, including notation, use of modern editions, and performance styles. Spring term: Advanced exploration of notation, performance styles, and ornamentation in specific repertoire. Open to conductors and instrumentalists with permission of the instructor. Judith Malafronte

MUS 601a/MUSI 805a, Johann Sebastian Bach’s Chorale Cantatas 4 credits. During the second year of his tenure at St. Thomas’s in Leipzig (1724–25), Johann Sebastian Bach started his so far largest project: a cycle of cantatas for the entire year, each of which was based on hymns of the Protestant church. Even though he broke off the project for unknown reasons in January 1725, the existing forty cantatas are the largest-scale cycle Bach composed, dwarfing by far his oratorios, passions, and organ music. The chorale cantatas are interesting for two reasons: the texts combine paraphrases of congregational hymns with interpretations of the biblical readings for the Sunday. Like a sermon, the cantatas aim to translate the biblical message into the present. Second, Bach experiments with different techniques of chorale settings, making the cycle of chorale cantatas an encyclopedia of his techniques as a composer of hymn settings. The course focuses on these two aspects, exploring how the theological and musical layers intersect and support each other. (M) Markus Rathey

MUS 617a/REL 643a, Music and Theology in the Sixteenth Century 4 credits. The Protestant Reformation in the sixteenth century was a “media event.” The invention of letterpress printing, the partisanship of famous artists like Dürer and Cranach, and, not least, the support of musicians and composers were responsible for spreading the thoughts of Reformation. But while Luther gave an important place to music, Zwingli and Calvin were much more skeptical. Music—especially sacred music—was not only a chance for Reformation, it was also a problem, because it was tightly connected with Catholic liturgical and aesthetic traditions. Reformers had to think about the place music could have in worship and about the function of music in secular life. But first of all, a theological authorization had to be found, because the authorization of music by any kind of tradition was no longer possible. The course shows how music was viewed by the reformers and which theological decisions formed the basis for their view. But we also consider the effect of these theological matters on musical practice: on liturgical singing and on composers and their compositions. (M) Markus Rathey

MUS 656a, Liturgical Keyboard Skills I 2 credits. In this course, students gain a deeper understanding and appreciation for musical genres, both those familiar to them and those different from their own, and learn basic techniques for their application in church service playing. Students learn to play hymns, congregational songs, service music, and anthems from a variety of sources, including music from the liturgical and free church traditions, including the Black Church experience. Hymn playing, with an emphasis on methods of encouraging congregational singing, is the principal focus of the organ instruction, but there is also instruction in chant and anthem accompaniment, including adapting a piano reduction to the organ. In the gospel style, beginning with the piano, students are encouraged to play by ear, using their aural skills in learning gospel music. This training extends to the organ, in the form of improvised introductions and varied accompaniments to hymns of all types. We seek to accomplish these goals by active participation and discussion in class. When not actually playing in class, students are encouraged to sing to the accompaniment of the person at the keyboard, to further their experience of singing with accompaniment, and to give practical encouragement to the person playing. Prerequisite: graduate-level organ and piano proficiency. Walden Moore

MUS 657a, Liturgical Keyboard Skills II 2 credits. The subject matter is the same as for MUS 656, but some variety is offered in the syllabus on a two-year cycle to allow second-year students to take the course without duplicating all of the means by which the playing techniques are taught. Walden Moore

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Divinity Courses

Courses are 3 credits unless otherwise indicated.

REL 3910a–b, Colloquium 1 credit per term. Participation in seminars led by faculty and guest lecturers on topics concerning theology, music, worship, and related arts. Required of all Institute of Sacred Music students. Martin D. Jean

REL 604a, Ritual Theory for Liturgical Studies This course is an introduction to the study of ritual as a universal phenomenon and a critical element of Christian worship and celebration. We read foundational thinkers in ritual theory (including Victor Turner, Ronald Grimes, and Catherine Bell) with an eye toward pastoral application and practice. Students engage in site visits in order to analyze ritual components of faith communities as well as learn to examine the practices of their own congregations. (W) Melanie C. Ross

REL 608b, Reformed Worship This course introduces students to the history, theology, and liturgical practices of Reformed worship. Through readings, lectures, class discussions, and actual practice designing and leading worship, students gain familiarity with the ethos and characteristics of Reformed worship; Reformed theologies of baptism and the Lord’s Supper; the historical development, ordering, and function of elements within the Lord’s Day service; weddings, funerals and other occasional services; and some of the contemporary debates regarding Reformed worship practice. This course has been especially designed for students who are in the Reformed Studies Certificate Program or who are considering ordination in one of the Reformed denominations (Presbyterian, DOC, UCC). Other students may take it with permission of the instructors. (W) Melanie C. Ross, Leonora Tubbs Tisdale

REL 643a/MUS 617a, Music and Theology in the Sixteenth Century The Protestant Reformation in the sixteenth century was a “media event.” The invention of letterpress printing, the partisanship of famous artists like Dürer and Cranach, and, not least, the support by musicians and composers were responsible for spreading the thoughts of Reformation. But while Luther gave an important place to music, Zwingli and Calvin were much more skeptical. Music–especially sacred music–was not only a chance for Reformation, it was also a problem, because it was tightly connected with Catholic liturgical and aesthetic traditions. Reformers had to think about the place music could have in worship and about the function of music in secular life. But first of all, a theological authorization had to be found, because the authorization of music by any kind of tradition was no longer possible. The course shows how music was viewed by the reformers and which theological decisions formed the basis for their view. But we also consider the effect of these theological matters on musical practice: on liturgical singing and on composers and their compositions. (M) Markus Rathey

REL 669b, Women in the Byzantine Liturgical Tradition This course is dedicated to the place of women within the Byzantine liturgical tradition. It addresses liturgical issues that particularly affect the lives of women, such as ritual purity, birth, and the churching of mother and child, and purification prayers for miscarriage/abortion. It also examines the existence but disappearance of the female diaconate, in addition to other liturgical roles of women in the past and today. Particular emphasis is placed on critically analyzing liturgical texts and situating them within their historical context and contemporary Orthodox theological reflection. (W) Nina Glibeti´c

REL 675a, Baptism and Eucharist in Ecumenical Dialogue This course engages students in recent conversations around the theology and practice of baptism and eucharist. Beginning with the 1982 World Council of Churches document Baptism, Eucharist, and Ministry, we read texts that have emerged from ecumenical sacramental dialogues in the past three decades and discuss major issues such as mutual recognition of baptism, patterns of Christian initiation, who may administer the sacraments, and open communion. (W) Melanie C. Ross

REL 680b, Churches of the East The Eastern Christian traditions trace their roots to the very beginnings of Christianity, have grown in the cradle of Christianity, have suffered persecution, and are still living Churches. However, if not unknown, Eastern Christianity is usually seen as a cultural curiosity of the East, an ossified remnant from the past, and as totally irrelevant to Western Christianity. In seeking to explore the place of the Eastern Churches in modern Christianity, this course focuses on the Syrian Orthodox Churches by exploring their Christological differences and their liturgical traditions. (W) Bryan D. Spinks, Baby Varghese

REL 682a, Foundations of Christian Worship The core course in Liturgical Studies. The course focuses on theological and historical approaches to the study of Christian worship, while also giving appropriate attention to pastoral, cultural, and contemporary issues. The first part of the course seeks to familiarize students with the basic elements of communal, public prayer in the Christian tradition (such as its roots in Hebrew Scripture, its Trinitarian basis and direction, its ways of figuring time and space, its use of language, scripture, music, the arts, etc.). The second part of the course provides an outline of historical developments, from biblical roots to the present. In addition, select class sessions focus on important questions such as the relationship between gendered lives and liturgical celebration, and between liturgy and ethical commitments such as earthcare. This gateway course to the Program in Liturgical Studies should be taken prior to other liturgy courses offered at Yale. The course is especially recommended for all students preparing for ordination and/or other responsibilities in worship leadership; it is also an essential course for all students interested in graduate work in liturgical studies. (W) Teresa Berger, Bryan D. Spinks

REL 686b, Christian Marriage: Biblical Themes, Theological Reflections, and Liturgical Celebrations The course explores the celebration of marriage, combining some biblical exegesis and theological reflection (historical and contemporary) with close examination of the evolution of the Christian liturgical rites of East and West. The history of the Western rites is traced from the earliest surviving documents to current American denomination books. The final two classes are concerned with the practical and pastoral aspects of officiating at weddings. (W) Bryan D. Spinks

REL 687a, English Reformation Liturgical Traditions and the Evolution of the Books of Common Prayer This course falls into two sections. The first covers the period 1500–1789 and is concerned with the development and theologies of the Reformation liturgical traditions in England and Scotland. The second is concerned with the specifically Anglican tradition, with the impact of the Tractarian and Liturgical Movements to the present. It compares the 1979 Book of Common Prayer and Enriching Our Worship with the 2006 Book of Common Worship of the Church of South India, and the Divine Liturgy of the Mar Thoma Church, which is in communion with the Anglican Church. (W) Bryan D. Spinks

REL 690a, Liturgical Theology This seminar proposes for scholarly inquiry key texts and themes in theological reflections on Christian worship. Such reflections on worship are as old as the Scriptures—e.g., John 4:24; Rom 8:26f—and even older, in that theological reflections are embedded in liturgical practices themselves, some of which lie behind the formation of the biblical texts. This seminar does not, however, span two thousand years of theological reflections on Christian worship, but focuses instead on twentieth-century texts and themes as these coalesce into a subfield in liturgical studies, often termed “liturgical theology.” (W) Teresa Berger

REL 801a–b, Marquand Chapel Choir 1 credit per term. Brett Terry

REL 802a–b, Marquand Gospel Choir 1/2 credit per term. Mark Miller

REL 812a, Principles and Practice of Preaching This is the introductory course in the theology, history, and practice of preaching. It is a prerequisite for upper-level homiletics courses. Special attention is given to biblical exposition, the congregational context, the appropriate use of experience, the development of a homiletical imagination, and engaging all the preacher’s gifts for communication. The course includes plenary presentations and small group preaching sections for which students prepare and deliver sermons. Leonora Tubbs Tisdale, Thomas H. Troeger

REL 901a, Critical Moments in the History of Christian Art This course examines art associated with, or related to, Christianity from its origins to the twenty-first century. Analyzing major artistic monuments and movements in a variety of regions, the course pays particular attention to how art shapes and is shaped by the social and historical circumstances of the period and culture. The course aims to familiarize students with key monuments of Christian architecture, sculpture, painting, and related arts, examining each within its own particular sociocultural perspective. (A) Vasileios Marinis

REL 920a, Writing About Religion A course in the history and practice of journalism and other popular nonfiction about religion. We read articles and books that have appeared for a nonspecialized, often secular audience, and consider how they succeed or fail. Sources include The New Yorker, The Atlantic, and other mainstream magazines. The course aims to give students a perspective on how the popular press has created the secular encounter with religion, and to prepare religious professionals to (a) think critically about their own faiths’ presentations in the written media, and (b) to write well for an irreligious audience—that is, to explain themselves to people who may be skeptics. (A) Mark Oppenheimer

REL 933a, Poetry and Faith This course is designed to look at issues of faith through the lens of poetry. With some notable exceptions, we concentrate on modern poetry—that is, poetry written between 1850 and 2013. Inevitably we also look at poetry through the lens of faith, but a working assumption of the course is that a poem is, for a reader (it’s more complicated for a writer), art first and faith second. You may want to challenge this assumption. The entire course may end up being a challenge to this assumption. “Faith” in this course generally means Christianity, and that is the primary context for reading the poems. But we also engage with poems from other faith traditions, as well as with poems that are wholly secular and even adamantly antireligious. (A) Christian Wiman

REL 944a, Religious Themes in Contemporary Short Fiction Readings in the contemporary short story from Flannery O’Connor to the present, with an interest both in the genre and in the various ways in which theological concerns of Christians and Jews are represented. Some of the authors included are Updike, Cheever, Tobias Wolff, Raymond Carver, Allegra Goodman, Nathan Englander, Erin McGraw, Kristin Valdez Quaid, and Jeffrey Eugenides. (A) Peter S. Hawkins

REL 952a, Christian Pilgrimage: Narratives, Materialities, Rituals This interdisciplinary seminar explores the phenomenon of Christian pilgrimage in the Late Antique and Medieval periods. We focus on three key aspects: travel narratives recorded by pilgrims during or after their journey; rituals, whether prescribed by the church authorities who controlled the sacred sites or those pertaining to private, individual devotions; and the material contexts of pilgrimage, such as art and architecture, at once permanent (in the case of buildings) and ephemeral (e.g., pilgrims’ tokens). Two field trips, to Ground Zero in Manhattan and to the Franciscan Monastery of the Holy Land in Washington, D.C., are an integral part of this course. (A) Vasileios Marinis

REL 954b/MUS 517b, Mary in the Middle Ages During the Middle Ages and the early Renaissance, Mary, mother of Christ, acquired several powerful, multifaceted identities: protector, intercessor, mediator, Theotokos (“God-bearer”), Queen of Heaven, unsurpassed model for both mothers and virgins. Throughout Europe the cult of Mary inspired a torrent of liturgical feasts, songs and motets, buildings and artifacts. The course explores the intimate interconnections among the music, texts, and materialities of the Virgin’s cult in Byzantine and Western Christianity. In a dialogue between music history and art history, students have the opportunity to study the cultural artifacts of their own discipline and to understand them in the context of their religious and cultural environment. (M, A) Markus Rathey, Vasileos Marinis

REL 956b, Postmodern Faith, Modern Fiction Although many Americans maintain strong religious beliefs and practices, the pressures of secularization and other challenges in late-modern society have provoked widespread reconsideration of traditional expressions of faith. Notions of God, salvation, redemption, even of faith itself, are subject to scrutiny by religious and nonreligious people alike. With special reference to Christian faith, this course examines this “difficult faith” through the prose fiction of five literary artists—Flannery O’Connor, Toni Morrison, Marilynne Robinson, Walker Percy, and Don DeLillo—considering the theological and literary implications of their work to modern quests for a redemptive vision of life. (A) David Mahan

REL 959a, Samuel Taylor Coleridge: Poetry, Literature, Bible Following the emergence of “Higher Criticism” in eighteenth-century Europe, Samuel Taylor Coleridge wrote a short book, Confessions of an Inquiring Spirit, exploring this new area of study, both in its interrelationship with literary and archaeological studies, and anticipating its controversial impact on both Church and academy in England. Coleridge’s book, and the cultural context in which it was written, is therefore a point of focus for understanding the related development of literary theory and biblical studies, and further offers an exploration of authority and inspiration. The book is also of interest, however, because in addition to exploring arguments about textual form, authorial intent, and the relationship of reader to author and text, the book itself is presented in a curious textual form—that of seven confessional letters to a friend—which is incomplete in its original manuscript. Analyzing the form as well as the content of the book thus adds a layer of complexity to Coleridge’s own arguments. (A) Maggi E. Dawn

REL 968b, The Passion of Christ in Literature and Visual Art The course surveys the Passion of Christ as it has been told in text, art, drama, and film. It is organized chronologically but develops certain recurring themes and issues, e.g., the mystery of Christ’s person, the blame for his death, the place of suffering in the Christian story, and the many ways the Passion has been imagined, exploited, and appropriated. (A) Peter S. Hawkins, Vasileios Marinis

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Yale College Course

HSAR 277b, Religion and Visual Culture in the Eastern Mediterranean, 313–800 C.E. This course examines how old and new religions both competed and communicated via art and architecture in the eastern Mediterranean from the time of emperor Constantine I through the rise of Islam. We investigate forms of visual expression in late antiquity and consider how images of the divine functioned to shape and reinforce cultural and social structures. (A) Örgü Dalgiç

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