Yale University.Calendar.Directories.

Non-Degree-Granting Programs, Councils, and Research Institutes

Atmospheric Science

Advisory Committee Hagit Affek (Geology & Geophysics), Sarbani Basu (Astronomy), Michelle Bell (Forestry & Environmental Studies), William Boos (Geology & Geophysics), Alexey Fedorov (Geology & Geophysics), Debra Fischer (Astronomy), Gary Haller (Chemical & Environmental Engineering; Chemistry), Xuhui Lee (Forestry & Environmental Studies), Rajendra Pachauri (Forestry & Environmental Studies), Mark Pagani (Geology & Geophysics), Daniel Rosner (Chemical & Environmental Engineering; Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science), Ronald Smith (Geology & Geophysics), Mitchell Smooke (Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science; Applied Physics), Sabatino Sofia (Astronomy), Trude Storelvmo (Geology & Geophysics), Mary-Louise Timmermans (Geology & Geophysics), Andrew Wells (Applied Mathematics), John Wettlaufer (Applied Mathematics; Geology & Geophysics; Physics)

A number of departments of the Graduate School offer courses dealing with the physics, dynamics, and chemistry of the atmosphere, and the interactions of the atmosphere with the biosphere, oceans, and cryosphere, including all biogeochemical cycles. The mathematical and physical science basis for these phenomena is developed in course work and research foci across a range of departments. In order to permit students whose interests lie in the field of atmospheric science to develop an integrated program of studies, an interdisciplinary program is offered. Typical areas of interest included in the scope of the program are theory of weather and climate, computational fluid dynamics, air pollution from industrial and natural sources, urban environmental health, global climatic change, paleoclimatology, hydrometeorology, and dynamics of atmospheric and oceanic motions. The program is individually planned for each student through a faculty adviser system.

Special Admissions Requirements

A student should, on the basis of scientific orientation, seek admission to one of the participating departments. The Department of Geology and Geophysics is the focus for studies of physical and dynamical meteorology, oceanography, and atmospheric chemistry, with allied methods and approaches in the Program on Applied Mathematics. The departments of Applied Physics, Public Health, and Engineering & Applied Science (which includes the programs of Biomedical Engineering, Chemical & Environmental Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science) provide additional courses in environmental health and atmospherically related processes. The Ph.D. and M.Phil. requirements are those of the admitting departments (see entries in this bulletin).

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Combined Program in the Biological and Biomedical Sciences (BBS)

L-203A Sterling Hall of Medicine, 203.785.5663

www.bbs.yale.edu

Director

Lynn Cooley (lynn.cooley@yale.edu)

Fields of Study

The Yale Combined Program in the Biological and Biomedical Sciences (BBS) offers unprecedented access to Yale’s extensive array of bioscience resources, encompassing everything the University has to offer in one comprehensive, interdisciplinary graduate program. BBS has no boundaries, either departmental or geographical. Students therefore have access to courses, seminars, and faculty labs in every department. Moreover, students can participate in research activities anywhere—on the main University campus, West Campus, or the School of Medicine.

Within BBS there are approximately 300 participating faculty, several dozen courses, and a great many seminars from which to choose. BBS is currently divided into seven interest-based “tracks”:

  • Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology
  • Computational Biology and Bioinformatics
  • Immunology
  • Microbiology
  • Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development
  • Molecular Medicine, Pharmacology, and Physiology
  • Neuroscience

Students apply to and, upon matriculation, affiliate with one of these seven tracks. It is important to note that, regardless of a student’s home track, all courses, faculty, and research opportunities at the University remain available.

Year 1 Each track has a faculty director who helps first-year students select courses and find suitable lab rotations. Students typically take two to three courses per term and conduct two to four lab rotations over the course of the year.

Year 2 Just prior to the start of the second year, students select a thesis adviser in whose lab they will conduct their doctoral research. They also then leave their BBS track and formally join one of twelve Ph.D.-granting programs:

  • Cell Biology
  • Cellular and Molecular Physiology
  • Computational Biology and Bioinformatics
  • Experimental Pathology
  • Genetics
  • Immunobiology
  • Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program
  • Microbiology
  • Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry
  • Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology
  • Neurobiology
  • Pharmacology

Students in year 2 complete the course requirements for the graduate program they have joined, take a qualifying exam, act as teaching assistants in lecture or lab courses, and begin thesis research.

Year 3 and beyond Students focus primarily on thesis research, publishing their results, and presenting their work at scientific meetings.

The average time to degree is 5.5 years.

For the duration of their studies all students receive a stipend, full tuition, and health coverage. Financial support comes from university fellowships, National Institutes of Health (NIH) training grants, and grants from foundations and companies.

Special Admissions Requirements

Entrance requirements to BBS are track-specific but include the following: GRE General Test scores; relevant GRE Subject Test scores (strongly recommended but not a strict requirement); undergraduate major in a relevant biological, chemical, or physical science; three letters of recommendation addressing the student’s academic performance and/or laboratory training; and TOEFL exam scores for students whose native language is not English. Track-specific requirements are listed below.

Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology

All applicants are expected to meet general BBS requirements for entrance. Successful applicants will have a firm foundation in the sciences. Desirable courses include biology; biochemistry; general, organic, and physical chemistry; physics; and math. A pertinent GRE Subject Test is strongly recommended.

Computational Biology and Bioinformatics

All applicants are expected to meet general BBS requirements for entrance. In addition, successful applicants will have a strong foundation in the basic sciences such as biology, chemistry, and mathematics. Training in computing/informatics is also essential and should include significant computer programming experience. The GRE Subject Test in cellular and molecular biology, biology, biochemistry, chemistry, computer science, or other relevant discipline is recommended. The MCAT is also accepted.

Immunology

All applicants are expected to meet general BBS requirements for entrance. In addition, successful applicants are expected to have a firm foundation in the biological and physical sciences. It is preferred that students have taken courses in biology, organic chemistry, biochemistry, genetics, cell biology, physics, and mathematics. Actual course requirements are not fixed, however, and students with outstanding records in any area of the biological sciences may qualify for admission. There are no specific grade requirements for prior course work, but a strong performance in basic science courses is of great importance for admission. In special cases the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) may be substituted.

Microbiology

No additional requirements or recommendations.

Molecular Cell Biology, Genetics, and Development

In addition to general BBS requirements, the GRE Subject Test in Biochemistry, Cell and Molecular Biology, Biology, or Chemistry is recommended.

Molecular Medicine, Pharmacology, and Physiology

All applicants are expected to meet general BBS requirements for entrance. Successful applicants should have a strong background in the biological, chemical, and/or physical sciences. For example, an undergraduate major/degree in biology, biochemistry, physiology, genetics, chemistry, physics, mathematics, engineering, or computer science could be appropriate. Courses in biology, biochemistry, organic and physical chemistry, and mathematics through elementary calculus are strongly recommended.

Neuroscience

All applicants are expected to meet general BBS requirements for entrance. Successful applicants will have a firm foundation in the sciences. The Neuroscience track will accept the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) in lieu of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test.

Program materials are available upon request to Bonnie Ellis, Assistant Administrative Director, BBS Program, Yale University, PO Box 208084, New Haven CT 06520-8084; telephone 203.785.5663; fax 203.785.3734; e-mail, bbs@yale.edu; Web site, www.bbs.yale.edu.

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The Cowles Foundation

30 Hillhouse Avenue, 203.432.3702

http://cowles.econ.yale.edu

Director

Donald Andrews

The Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics at Yale University has as its purpose the conduct and encouragement of research in economics and related fields. The Cowles Foundation seeks to foster the development and application of rigorous logical, mathematical, and statistical methods of analysis. Members of the Cowles research staff are faculty members with appointments and teaching responsibilities in the Department of Economics and other departments. Among its activities, the Cowles Foundation provides financial support for research, visiting faculty, postdoctoral fellowships, workshops, and graduate students. Cowles regularly sponsors conferences and publishes a working paper series and research monographs.

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The Economic Growth Center

27 Hillhouse Avenue, 203.432.3610

www.econ.yale.edu/~egcenter

Director

Mark Rosenzweig

The Economic Growth Center is a research organization within the Yale Department of Economics that was created in 1961 to analyze, both theoretically and empirically, economic growth and the economic relations between low- and high-income countries. The research program emphasizes the search for regularities in the process of growth and changes in economic structure using existing data sets. In recent years the center has also undertaken new and continuing long-term panel studies and is carrying out randomized field experiments in a number of countries to provide new information on and analyses of the consequences and mechanisms of development. An increasing share of the research involves historical analysis of long-term processes as part of the Economic History Program that is housed in the Economic Growth Center. Current projects in the center include research on technology development; choice and transfer; microfinance and credit markets; formal insurance; household consumption; investment and demographic behavior; the role of networks; agricultural research and productivity growth; labor markets and the returns to education of women and men; income distribution; domestic and international migration; the relationship between trade and development; and international political economy. The center’s research faculty hold appointments in the Department of Economics and other departments and schools at Yale, and accordingly have teaching as well as research responsibilities.

The center sponsors a number of activities, including a regular series of workshops on development, trade, labor and population, and economic history, and provides competitive research grants to graduate students and faculty as well as graduate student fellowships.

The Economic Growth Center Collection, housed in a separate facility at the Center for Science and Social Science Information, is a special collection focused on the statistical, economic, and planning documents of developing countries, including government documents.

The center administers, jointly with the Department of Economics, the Yale master’s degree training program in International and Development Economics.

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Humanities: Mellon Program

Director of Graduate Studies

Pamela Schirmeister (pamela.schirmeister@yale.edu)

Advisory Committee Julia Adams (Sociology), Dudley Andrew (Comparative Literature, Film Studies), Emily Bakemeier (Deputy Provost), Howard Bloch (French), Bryan Garsten (Political Science), Tamar Gendler (Philosophy), Daniel Harrison (Music), Edward Kamens (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Mary Miller (Dean of Yale College; History of Art), Marc Robinson (Theater Studies; English), Pamela Schirmeister (Associate Dean, Yale College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences), Gary Tomlinson (Music), Michael Warner (English; American Studies)

The Mellon-funded program Re-imagining Humanities Education at Yale runs from 2012 through 2016 and includes related initiatives at the undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral levels. Collectively, these initiatives work to address the well recognized challenges of narrowly focused courses and the effects on the curriculum, and, in particular, the limitations of such courses in preparing graduates for the future and attracting undergraduates in the present. At each level, albeit in different ways, the idea is to establish a flow of new ideas among a community of scholars that would seamlessly extend from those teaching undergraduates through graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, making it possible for students and faculty alike to participate in broader conversations across the humanities disciplines.

Special Admissions Requirement

At the graduate level, the program offers a nondegree course of study for students enrolled in any of Yale’s Ph.D. programs in the humanities and humanistic social sciences. Students normally apply to the graduate concentration in their second year of study.

Requirements for the Graduate Certificate of Concentration

The program centers on a core seminar, the topic of which changes each year. The core seminars are team-taught, interdisciplinary, yearlong courses aimed at developing students’ intellectual breadth beyond the scope of their home discipline. While in the concentration students take between one and three additional courses concomitant with the core seminar. At least one of these courses must be outside of the student’s home department or program. During this year, students will work on exam and prospectus preparation for their home department, but students may not teach. Instead they are provided an additional year of University fellowship for the year. In years four and five, students are expected to assist in teaching one course per term. Most students will teach at least one course outside of their home department, a course at the introductory level, and, when possible, will team-teach a course with someone working in another discipline. In years four and beyond, students are also expected to participate in working groups that will be formed within each cohort of the program.

Courses

HUMS 901, Technologies of Knowledge Francesco Casetti, Tamar Gendler, Emily Greenwood

At the heart of this topic lie fundamental questions about how we think, how we know, and how we order thought and knowledge. Recalling the ancient Greek noun techne¯ (a noun with a large semantic range encompassing art, craft, skill, method or system of doing or making, knowledge base), which nests in the word “technology,” the course offers graduate students and participating faculty the opportunity to undertake an archaeology of technologies of knowledge from the earliest attempts to theorize technologies of knowledge through to the meta-technologies of knowledge that constitute the digital humanities. This is foundational for a wide range of arts, humanities, and humanistic social sciences disciplines and raises a series of intellectual questions that underpin both the history and the future of the humanities.

The topic of the 2014–2015 core seminar will be announced in the fall of 2013.

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Institution for Social and Policy Studies

77 Prospect Street, 203.432.3234

http://isps.yale.edu

Director

Jacob Hacker

Executive Committee Julia Adams, Richard Breen, John Dovidio, Heather Gerken, Benjamin Polak, Ian Shapiro, Jody Sindelar

The Institution for Social and Policy Studies (ISPS) facilitates interdisciplinary social science inquiry on important public policy subjects in order to advance research, shape policy outcomes, and educate the next generation of thinkers and leaders.

Recognizing that important social problems cannot be studied adequately by a single discipline, the Yale Corporation established ISPS in 1968 to stimulate interdisciplinary collaboration within the University. Today, as a hub for interdisciplinary policy research and discussion at Yale, ISPS hosts a number of major programs, including the University Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics; the Center for the Study of American Politics; and the Program in Ethics, Politics, and Economics. Through these programs and other policy initiatives, ISPS sponsors high-level conferences, interdisciplinary faculty seminars, targeted research projects on key policy issues, graduate and undergraduate fellowship programs, postdoctoral appointments, and the undergraduate major in Ethics, Politics, and Economics. ISPS has a particular interest in three broad areas of inquiry: inequality, health care, and the performance of our democratic institutions.

Through our work in these areas and others, ISPS seeks to provide intellectual leadership in the social sciences; foster sound and creative research on public policies of local, national, and international significance; and inform both teaching at Yale and academic and public debates beyond Yale.

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International Security Studies

31 Hillhouse Avenue, 203.432.6242

http://iss.yale.edu

Codirectors

Adam Tooze and Paul Kennedy

International Security Studies (ISS) at Yale was founded in 1988 and is supported by the Smith Richardson Foundation and the Friends of ISS. The Brady-Johnson Program in Grand Strategy, directed by John Lewis Gaddis, operates under ISS’s auspices.

Although ISS is not a degree-granting program, its faculty members, fellows, and affiliates write and teach about numerous aspects of international history and world affairs. Their interests range from high politics and economic change to cultural transfer and nongovernmental activism. ISS strives to understand the genealogy of the present through diverse historical and methodological approaches, and to develop and apply holistic insights into the most pressing concerns of global life.

ISS organizes an array of extracurricular activities each academic year. It hosts lectures, dinner debates, conferences, colloquia, and discussion groups. In addition to hosting a running graduate and faculty forum on the historical roots of contemporary issues, ISS provides competitive summer grants to support language training and archival research for Yale students. Postdoctoral fellowships and predoctoral fellowships are available to scholars from other universities. ISS also provides academic fellowships and visiting affiliations to serving members of the U.S. Armed Forces.

Inquiries should be directed to iss@yale.edu or to International Security Studies, Yale University, PO Box 208353, New Haven CT 06520-8353. Further information on ISS can be found at http://iss.yale.edu.

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Judaic Studies

451 College Street, 203.432.0843

http://judaicstudies.yale.edu

Chair and Director of Graduate Studies

Steven Fraade

Professors Steven Fraade (Religious Studies), Paul Franks (Philosophy), Christine Hayes (Religious Studies), Ivan Marcus (History; Religious Studies), Aharon Maman (Visiting, Religious Studies), Michael Silber (Visiting, History), Yuval Sinai (Visiting, Religious Studies)

Associate Professors Hindy Najman (Religious Studies), Marci Shore (History)

Assistant Professor Eliyahu Stern (Religious Studies; History)

Senior Research Scholar Margaret Olin (Divinity School; History of Art; Religious Studies)

Senior Lecturers Peter Cole (Comparative Literature), David Fisher (Visiting, Film Studies)

Lecturers Gabriel Citron (Philosophy), Yishai Kiel (Religious Studies), Eve Krakowski (Religious Studies)

Senior Lector II Ayala Dvoretzky (Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations)

Senior Lector Shiri Goren (Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations)

Lector Dina Roginsky (Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations)

Judaic Studies offers an interdisciplinary approach to the critical study of the languages, history, literature, religion, and culture of the Jews. Jewish society, texts, ideologies, and institutions are studied in comparative historical perspective in relation to the surrounding societies and cultures.

Graduate-level programs are available through the following departments: History (Ancient, Medieval, and Modern Jewish History), Religious Studies (History and Literature of Ancient Judaism, Medieval and Modern Jewish History), Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations (Northwest Semitic, Hebrew Language and Literature), Comparative Literature (Hebrew and Comparative Literature). Applications are made to a specific department, and programs of study are governed by the degree requirements of that department.

Other resources include the Judaica collection of Sterling Memorial Library and its Judaica bibliographer, the Fortunoff Archive for Holocaust Testimonies, the biweekly faculty/graduate student Judaic Studies Seminar, several lecture series, postdoctoral fellowships, and graduate fellowships in Judaic Studies.

Program materials are available on request to the director of graduate studies of the department of intended specialization, or to the Chair, Program of Judaic Studies, Yale University, PO Box 208282, New Haven CT 06520-8282, and at http://judaicstudies.yale.edu.

Courses

JDST 684bU/RLST 725bU, Talmudic Narratives in Context Yishai Kiel

The course offers a window into the critical study of Talmudic narratives through an in-depth analysis of selected stories from the Babylonian Talmud. By way of direct encounter with the primary sources, the course considers a variety of perspectives (historical, literary, cultural, philological, comparative, and theological), through which the Talmudic narratives are illuminated. M 3:30–5:20

JDST 690b/CPLT 905b, Jewish and Arabic Literature in Israeli Space  Hannan Hever

The Hebrew language in Israel is a juncture of Jewish and Arabic literature, whether by way of translations or by way of Arab authors and poets writing in Hebrew. This course offers analyses of both Jewish and Arabic literary texts within the context of the conflicting cultural and political reality. Another such juncture to be discussed is writings by Arab-Jews (Jews from Arab countries, Mizrahim) and their acceptance (or the lack thereof) in the context of an Israeli literary space. TH 3:30–5:20

JDST 691a/CPLT 691a, Hebrew Allegory as Cultural Critique Hannan Hever

This course studies thoroughly the theory of allegory (Fletcher, Auerbach, Benjamin, de Man, Gadamer). These theories guide (and are analyzed by) readings in Hebrew texts from the Bible to the twenty-first century. Literary texts are read in Hebrew; the discussion is conducted in English. TH 3:30–5:20

JDST 721bu/RLST 751bU, Introduction to Judaism in the Ancient World  Steven Fraade

The emergence of classical Judaism in its historical setting. Jews and Hellenization; varieties of early Judaism; apocalyptic and postapocalyptic responses to suffering and catastrophe; worship and atonement without sacrificial cult; interpretations of scriptures; law and life; the rabbi; the synagogue; faith in reason; Sabbath and festivals; history and its redemption. MW 11:35–12:50

JDST 725aU/RLST 757aU, The Dead Sea Scrolls and the History of Ancient Judaism: The Damascus Document Steven Fraade

Study of one of the most important of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Damascus Document. Attention to its place within the history of biblical interpretation and ancient Jewish law, the nature and rhetorical function of its textual practices, both narrative and legal, its ideological formulations, literary history, and relation to the central sectarian writings of the Qumran community. Prerequisite: reading fluency in ancient Hebrew. W 9:25–11:15

JDST 727bU/RLST 752bU, Mishnah Seminar: Tractate Rosh HaShanah  Steven Fraade

Close study of a tractate of the Mishnah, the earliest digest of rabbinic law, and its accompanying Tosefta, dealing with rules for the establishment of New Moons, the intercalation of the lunar calendar, the testimony and examination of witnesses, the festival of the New Year (Rosh HaShanah), and the sounding of the Shofar. Dual attention to the historical significance of the legal and ritual institutions represented and to the cultural significance of the rhetoric of that representation, including the interplay of law and narrative. Consideration also given to the relation of the rabbinic calendrical system to those of antecedents, especially as evidenced in the Dead Sea Scrolls, as well as to talmudic and later interpretation of the Mishnah. Prerequisite: reading fluency in ancient Hebrew. TH 9:25–11:15

JDST 737aU/CPLT 628a/GMAN 685aU/RLST 682aU, Translating the Sacred  Kirk Wetters, Hindy Najman

The transformation of ancient and modern textual traditions, with particular focus on the effects of translation and the historical dynamics of cultural transfer, appropriation, reception, and reinterpretation. Readings include canonical and noncanonical scriptural sources (Deuteronomy, Jeremiah, Jubilee, Temple Scroll, 4 Ezra, Epistle to the Hebrews, Revelation, Midrash selections from Sifrei Devarim, Eichah Rabbah, Bereshit Rabbah); modern literary authors (Petrarch, Goethe, Dostoevsky, Kafka, Borges); theoretical and philosophical works (Philo of Alexandria, Nietzsche, Benjamin, Scholem, Foucault, Szondi). M 1:30–3:20

JDST 739a/RLST 741a, Multilingualism and Translation in Ancient Judaism  Steven Fraade

In-depth study of a wide range of evidence, both literary and inscriptional, for the widespread prevalence of multilingualism in ancient Jewish society and culture of Greco-Roman times, especially as evidenced in the use of Greek, Hebrew, and Aramaic in a variety of contexts. The function of translation, especially of sacred scriptures, in mediating between different languages and their cultural domains. Intended for graduate students in ancient Judaism and related fields. Prerequisite: reading fluency in ancient Hebrew. T 9:25–11:15

JDST 740bU/RLST 820bU, Prophecy in Context Robert Wilson, Hindy Najman

The course traces the nature of biblical prophecy in its original Near Eastern and Greek cultural settings, its role in the Hebrew Bible, and its afterlife in later Christian and Jewish interpretive traditions. T 1:30–3:20

JDST 751a/RLST 737a, Composition and Authorship Hindy Najman

Collection and tradition formation in Ancient Judaism with focus on reading primary texts in the original Hebrew and Aramaic. Scholarly approaches to source differentiation, redaction of literary tradition, and the history of editing and textual expansion in the history of textual redaction are considered in the context of studying the following writers and collections: Hebrew Bible, Dead Sea Scrolls, Pseudepigrapha, Rabbinic Midrash (selections from Bereshit Rabbah, Eichah Rabbah, Heikhalot). T 3:30–5:20

JDST 756b/REL 593b/RLST 700b, Philo of Alexandria: Interpretive Context, Philosophical Affinities, and Reception Harold Attridge, Hindy Najman

This seminar, required for all doctoral students in the fields of New Testament, Ancient Christianity, and Ancient Judaism, focuses on the Jewish philosophical exegete, Philo. This member of the Jewish elite of Alexandria in the early Roman period explored the meaning of Torah within the context of established and emerging Second Temple interpretation and tradition and a distinctively Hellenistic framework. In doing so he provided a framework and a collection of hermeneutical tools that would prove invaluable to Christian theologians of the patristic period and, to a lesser extent, Rabbinic Jews. Philo’s interpretations, interpretive strategies, and philosophical explanations provide us with a glimpse into the work of Second Temple Judaism and in particular the Jewish community of Alexandria in the first century C.E. The seminar explores Philo’s reading of scripture, its philosophical framework, and its impact on later interpreters. For students taking the course for credit, a substantial research paper is required. Auditors are asked to contribute a brief report or review. W 3:30–5:20

JDST 759aU/RLST 755aU, Paths of Purity in Ancient Judaism Yishai Kiel

The course provides a window into the purity systems of ancient Judaism, in light of contemporary academic scholarship. Historically, the course runs from the biblical systems reflected in the Priestly source and the Holiness code of the Bible and its ancient Near Eastern heritage through the purity debates of the Second Temple period to the rabbinic and early Christian discussions. We trace the distinct religious realms associated with purity (ritual purity, moral purity, holiness, eating taboos, etc.) and survey the different trajectories taken in recent scholarly works, in an attempt to decipher and illuminate the inherent logic as well as social and religious functions of the purity systems in ancient Judaism. M 3:30–5:20

JDST 760b/RLST 772b, Rabbinics Research Seminar Christine Hayes

An in-depth survey of research debates and of methods and resources employed in the study of classical (pre-Geonic) rabbinic literature of all genres. This seminar is required for graduate students in Ancient Judaism. Prerequisites: knowledge of Hebrew and Aramaic, ability to read academic Hebrew, and permission of the instructor. T 1:30–3:20

JDST 761aU/HIST 596aU/RLST 773aU, History of the Jews and Their Diasporas to Early Modern Times Ivan Marcus

A broad introduction to the history of the Jews from biblical beginnings until the European Reformation and the Ottoman Empire. Focus on the formative period of classical rabbinic Judaism and on the symbiotic relationship among Jews, Christians, and Muslims. An overview of Jewish society and culture in its biblical, rabbinic, and medieval settings. TTH 11:35–12:50

JDST 764bU/HIST 590bU/RLST 777bU, Jews in Muslim Lands from the Seventh to Sixteenth Century Ivan Marcus

Introduction to Jewish culture and society in Muslim lands from the Prophet Muhammad to Suleiman the Magnificent. Topics include Islam and Judaism; Jerusalem as a holy site; rabbinic leadership and literature in Baghdad; Jewish courtiers, poets, and philosophers in Muslim Spain; and the Jews in the Ottoman Empire. TTH 11:35–12:50

JDST 766aU/HIST 588aU/NELC 561aU/RLST 754aU, Jewish Sectarianism in the Middle Ages Eve Krakowski

Varieties of Jewish religious life in the medieval Islamic world. The development of medieval rabbinic and non-rabbinic (particularly Karaite) literatures in their contemporary Near Eastern contexts; scripturalism, exegesis, theology, and legal writing; popular religion and religious identity in everyday life. T 9:25–11:15

JDST 780bU/RLST 747bU, Jewish Citizenship in Modern Europe Eliyahu Stern

Seventeenth- to twentieth-century responses to Jewish citizenship in modern European states. Religious law; modern Jewish identity; Zionism; Judaism as a religion vs. a nation; the place of minorities in contemporary Europe. W 9:25–11:15

JDST 786aU/RLST 742aU, Jewish Philosophy Paul Franks

An introduction to problems arising from the claim that God speaks to human beings. Topics include anthropomorphic language, kabbalistic anthropology, purposiveness in nature and history, law and commandment, chosenness and universality, messianism. MW 11:35–12:50

JDST 790b/HIST 601b/RLST 776b, The Jews in Medieval Societies Ivan Marcus

Research seminar that focuses on a comparison of the two medieval Jewish subcultures of Ashkenaz (northern Christian Europe) and Sefarad (mainly Muslim and Christian Spain). Issues in historiography and comparative methodology complement discussions about the symbols and reality of literary, political, and economic features of each society. T 1:30–3:20

JDST 793bU/HIST 587bU/RLST 799bU, Introduction to Modern Jewish Thought  Eliyahu Stern

An overview of Jewish philosophical trends, movements, and thinkers from the seventeenth to the twenty-first century. Topics include enlightenment, historicism, socialism, secularism, religious radicalism, and Zionism. TTH 11:35–12:25, 1 HTBA

JDST 830bU/RLST 830bU, Jewish Law in a Pluralistic Israel Yuval Sinai

Introduction to the history of pluralism and multicultural models in the Jewish legal tradition. The role of Jewish law in contemporary multicultural and pluralistic Israeli society; tensions between Jewish law and secular law; possible reconciliation of these tensions in light of both Jewish legal tradition and the realities of the modern Jewish and democratic state of Israel. MW 2:30–3:45

JDST 831aU/RLST 831aU, Modern Applications of Jewish Law in the State of Israel  Yuval Sinai

A historical study of Jewish law as the basis for modern Israeli law. Examination of cases in Israeli secular civil courts and in rabbinical courts. Attention to the wide range of subjects in which Jewish law has been utilized: public law, war and peace, criminal law, torts and biomedical law, morality, employment, judicial processes of procedure and evidence, and civil rights. MW 2:30–3:45

JDST 833aU/HIST 604aU, Tradition in Crisis: A History of Orthodox Jewry in Modern Times Michael Silber

Once thought to be a dying trend in Judaism, Orthodoxy has had a surprising resurgence in the past few decades. This has prompted a reexamination of the history of Orthodox Jewry over the past two centuries. Orthodoxy was by no means monolithic and underwent increasing differentiation engendering often conflicting responses in order to meet the challenges of modern times, trends such as acculturation and secularization, ideologies and movements such as the Haskala (Jewish Enlightenment), religious Reform and Jewish nationalism, as well as the emergence of the State of Israel. T 3:30–5:20

JDST 834bU/HIST 589bU, Paths of Emancipation: Jews and the State in the Modern Era Michael Silber

The process of Jewish emancipation was complex and not uniform. It varied greatly in the different states and societies of the modern world. This course seeks to compare the trajectories that Jewish emancipation took in different contexts by concentrating on variations of the state and civil society, as well as such factors as capitalism, citizenship, nationalism, and social and economic developments. TH 3:30–5:20

For course offerings in the Hebrew language and in Israeli society and culture, see Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations.

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The Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale

Luce Hall, 203.432.3410

www.yale.edu/macmillan

Director

Ian Shapiro (Political Science)

For more than four decades the Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale has been the University’s principal institution for encouraging and coordinating teaching and research on international affairs and on societies and cultures around the world. The MacMillan Center endeavors to make understanding the world outside the borders of the United States an integral part of liberal education and professional training at the University. It brings together scholars from all relevant schools and departments to provide insightful interdisciplinary comparative and problem-oriented teaching and research on regional, international, and global issues.

The MacMillan Center provides eleven degree programs. The seven undergraduate majors include African Studies; East Asian Studies; Global Affairs; Latin American Studies; Modern Middle East Studies; Russian and East European Studies; and South Asian Studies. The four graduate degree programs award master’s degrees in African Studies, East Asian Studies, Global Affairs, and European and Russian Studies. There are joint-degree graduate programs with the schools of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Law, Management, and Public Health. Additionally, the programs offer seven Graduate Certificates of Concentration: in African Studies, European Studies, Global Health, International Development Studies, International Security Studies, Latin American and Iberian Studies, and Modern Middle East Studies.

The many councils, committees, and programs at the MacMillan Center support research and teaching across departments and professions, support doctoral training, advise students at all levels, and provide extracurricular learning opportunities, as well as funding resources for student and faculty research related to their regions and subject areas. Regional studies programs include African Studies, British Studies, Canadian Studies, East Asian Studies, European Studies, Hellenic Studies, Latin American and Iberian Studies, Middle East Studies, South Asian Studies, and Southeast Asia Studies. Comparative and international programs include the Jackson Institute for Global Affairs; the Center for the Study of Globalization; European Union Studies; Genocide Studies; the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition; Global Health; Global Justice; International and Comparative Political Economy; Order, Conflict, and Violence; and the Program on Democracy.

The MacMillan Center’s regional councils regularly teach all levels of nine foreign languages (Modern Greek, Hindi, Indonesian, Sanskrit, Swahili, Urdu, Vietnamese, Yorùbá, Zulu). Together with central MacMillan resources, they collaborate with the Center for Language Study (CLS) in supporting Directed Independent Language Study of another sixty-four languages for undergraduate, graduate, and professional school students. Regional councils and language faculty participate actively in the Cornell, Columbia, and Yale shared course initiative led by CLS, using distance learning technology to send Dutch, Modern Greek, Yorùbá, and Zulu, and to receive Bengali, Romanian, and Tamil.

The MacMillan Center provides opportunities for scholarly research and intellectual innovation; awards nearly 500 fellowships and grants each year; encourages faculty/student interchange; sponsors some 750 lectures, conferences, workshops, seminars, and films each year (most of which are free and open to the public); produces a range of working papers and other academic publications; and contributes to library collections comprising 1.4 million volumes in the languages of various areas. In addition to administering the master’s program in Global Affairs, the Jackson Institute for Global Affairs provides career counseling services to Yale students interested in diplomatic service or careers with international agencies or nongovernmental organizations. Through the Programs in International Educational Resources (PIER), the MacMillan Center brings international education and training to educators, K–12 students, the media, businesses, and the community at large. The MacMillan Center supports The MacMillan Report, an online show that features Yale faculty in international and area studies and their research in a one-on-one interview format. Webisodes can be viewed at www.yale.edu/macmillanreport. The MacMillan Center is also home to Yale Global Online.

For details on degrees, programs, and faculty leadership, please consult www.yale.edu/macmillan.

Graduate Certificates of Concentration in International and Area Studies

General Guidelines—Program Description

The Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale, through the Jackson Institute for Global Affairs and the regional councils on African, European, Latin American and Iberian, and Middle East Studies, sponsors graduate certificates of concentration that students may pursue in conjunction with graduate-degree programs in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and the professional schools. The certificate is intended for students seeking to demonstrate substantial preparation in the study of one of the seven areas of concentration: regional (Africa, Europe, Latin America, Middle East) or thematic and international (Development, Global Health, and Security).

Candidates for the certificate must demonstrate expertise in the area of concentration through their major graduate or professional field, as well as show command of the diverse interdisciplinary, geographic, and cultural-linguistic approaches associated with expertise in the area of concentration. Admission to the graduate certificate is contingent on the candidate’s acceptance into a Yale graduate-degree program. Award of the graduate certificate, beyond fulfilling the relevant requirements, is contingent on the successful completion of the candidate’s Yale University degree program.

Application Procedure

Specific requirements of each council are reflected in its application, monitoring, and award procedures. Application forms can be picked up at the relevant council or downloaded from its Web site. Prospective students should submit a completed application form to the relevant council.

Applications may be submitted by students admitted to a graduate program at Yale or during their program of study but no later than the beginning of the penultimate term of study. Each council may set limits on the number of candidates for its program in any given year. For further information, see the council administrator.

Summary of General Requirements

While the general requirements are consistent across all councils of the MacMillan Center, the specific requirements of each council may vary according to the different expertise required for its area of concentration. In addition to the specific requirements, students pursuing the certificate are expected to be actively engaged in the relevant council’s intellectual community and to be regular participants at its events, speaker series, and other activities. Serious study, research, and/or work experience overseas in the relevant region is highly valued. The requirements:

  • 1. Six courses in the area of concentration (in at least two different fields).
  • 2. Language proficiency in at least one language relevant to the area of concentration beyond proficiency in English. For some councils and for some individual circumstances, proficiency in two languages beyond English is required.
  • 3. Interdisciplinary research paper focused on the area of concentration.

Further Details on General Requirements

  • 1. Course work
  • Students must complete a total of six courses focused on the area from at least two different fields including a Foundations Course if designated by the council. Of the remaining five courses only two may be “directed readings” or “independent study.” Please note:
  • • No more than four courses may count from any one discipline or school.
  • • Courses from the home field of the student are eligible. Courses may count toward the student’s degree as well as toward the certificate.
  • • Literature courses at the graduate level may count toward the six-course requirement, but elementary or intermediate language courses may not. At the discretion of the faculty adviser, an advanced language course at the graduate level may be counted if it is taught with substantial use of field materials such as literature, history, or social science texts and journals relevant to the area.
  • • Course work must demonstrate broad comparative knowledge of the region rather than focus on a specific country.
  • • Course work must demonstrate a grasp of the larger thematic concerns affecting the region, such as environment, migration, or global financial movements.
  • • Only those courses listed on the Graduate Course Listings provided by the area council may be used to fulfill course requirements. For courses not listed there, please consult the certificate adviser. Non-listed courses may only be counted with prior approval of the council adviser, not after the fact.
  • • A minimum grade of HP must be obtained or the course will not be counted toward the certificate.
  • • Only course work taken during the degree program at Yale may be counted toward the certificate.
  • 2. Language proficiency
  • In the major-area language targeted for meeting the proficiency requirement, students must demonstrate the equivalent ability of two years of language study at Yale with a grade of B+ or better. Language proficiency must encompass reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills plus grammar. Students may demonstrate proficiency by completing course work, by testing at Yale, or by other means as approved by the council adviser. When a second major language of the region beyond English is required, the relevant council will specify the target level. The typical departmental graduate reading exam is not sufficient for certifying the four-skill language requirement of the certificate.
  • Normally, when the candidate is a native speaker of one of the area’s major languages, he/she will be expected to develop language proficiency in a second major area language.
  • 3. Interdisciplinary research paper
  • A qualifying research paper is required to demonstrate field-specific research ability focused on the area of concentration. After they have completed substantial course work in the area of concentration, students must seek approval from the council faculty adviser for the research project they propose as the qualifying paper. Normally, the student will submit the request no later than the fourth week of the term in which he or she plans to submit the qualifying paper.
  • The interdisciplinary research paper may be the result of original research conducted under the supervision of a faculty member in a graduate seminar or independent readings course or in field research related to the student’s studies. An M.A. thesis, Ph.D. prospectus, or dissertation may also be acceptable if it is interdisciplinary as well as focused on the area of concentration. The qualifying paper should examine questions concerning the area of concentration in a comparative and/or interdisciplinary context. It should also use relevant international and area-focused resource materials from a relevant region and/or resource materials in the language(s) of a relevant region or regions. Normally the paper should incorporate at least two of the following elements:
  • • Address more than one country relevant to the area of concentration
  • • Draw on more than one disciplinary field for questions or analytic approaches
  • • Address a transregional or transnational theme relevant to the area of concentration
  • The paper will be read by two faculty members selected in agreement with the council adviser. The readers will be evaluating the paper for the quality of research, knowledge of the relevant literature, and depth of analysis of the topic. The qualifying paper must be fully footnoted and have a complete bibliography. The council adviser may call for a third reader as circumstances warrant.

Progress Reports and Filing for the Award of the Certificate/Qualification

Students should submit a progress report along with a copy of their unofficial transcript to the council faculty adviser at the end of each term. Ideally, this will include a brief narrative describing the student’s engagement in the relevant council’s intellectual community and participation in its events, speaker series, and the like, as well as any planned or newly completed experience overseas.

A student who intends to file for the final award of the certificate should contact the council no later than the end of the term prior to award. By the fourth week of the term of the expected award at the latest, the candidate should demonstrate how he/she has or will have completed all the requirements on time.

At the end of the term as grades are finalized, the council will confirm that the candidate is cleared to receive the home degree and has fulfilled all the requirements of the certificate. The final award will require review and clearance by the relevant associate director of the MacMillan Center.

Pursuit of Two Certificates by a Single Student

No courses may overlap between the two certificates. Any application for two certificates by a single student must robustly fulfill all of the requirements for each of the two certificates. Each certificate must be approved independently by each respective council’s certificate adviser.

In addition to the approval of both council advisers, any award of two certificates will require review and approval by the relevant associate director of the MacMillan Center.

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Council on African Studies

The MacMillan Center

309 Luce Hall, 203.432.9903

www.yale.edu/macmillan/african

Graduate Certificate of Concentration in African Studies

Chair

Christopher Udry (Economics)

Faculty

For faculty listings, see the section on African Studies under Degree-Granting Departments and Programs in this bulletin.

Special Requirements for the Graduate Certificate of Concentration in African Studies

The Graduate Certificate of Concentration in African Studies enables graduate and professional school students in fields other than African Studies to demonstrate interdisciplinary area expertise, language proficiency, and research competence in African Studies. The certificate program is intended to complement existing fields of studies in other M.A. and Ph.D. programs and to provide the equivalent of such specialization for students in departments and schools without Africa-related fields of study. The certificate program is designed to be completed within the time span of a normal Ph.D. residence. Professional school students and M.A. students in the Graduate School may require an additional term of registration to complete the certificate requirements depending on the requirements of specific programs.

The certificate program includes interdisciplinary course work, language study, and research components. The specific requirements are:

  • 1. Successful completion of at least six courses in African Studies from at least two departments or schools, one of which is a core course in African Studies (AFST 764b, Topics in African Studies, or AFST 501a, Research Methods in African Studies).
  • 2. Demonstration of proficiency in an African language.
  • 3. Evidence of research expertise in African Studies. Research expertise may be demonstrated by completion of an interdisciplinary thesis, dissertation prospectus, or dissertation or by completion of a substantive research seminar paper or the equivalent as approved by the faculty adviser.

The certificate courses and research work should be planned to demonstrate clearly fulfillment of the goals of the certificate. Certificate candidates should design their course schedules in consultation with the director of graduate studies for African Studies. Ideally, students should declare their intention to complete the certificate requirements early in their program at Yale. Graduate and professional school students who intend to complete the certificate program must declare their intention to do so no later than during their penultimate term of enrollment.

For course listings, see African Studies under Degree-Granting Departments and Programs in this bulletin.

Program materials are available upon request to the Director of Graduate Studies, Council on African Studies, Yale University, PO Box 208206, New Haven CT 06520-8206; e-mail, africanstudies@yale.edu.

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Council on East Asian Studies

The MacMillan Center

320 Luce Hall, 203.432.3426

http://eastasianstudies.research.yale.edu

Chair

Daniel Botsman (History)

Faculty

For faculty listings, see the section on East Asian Studies, under Degree-Granting Departments in this bulletin.

The Council on East Asian Studies (CEAS) was founded in 1961 and continues a long tradition of East Asian Studies at Yale. CEAS provides an important forum for academic exploration and support related to the study of China, Japan, and Korea. For more than fifty years, it has promoted education about East Asia both in the college curricula and through lectures and workshops, conferences, cultural events, and educational activities open to faculty, students, K–16 educators, and the general public. CEAS has been designated a National Resource Center for the study of Asian languages and cultures by the U.S. Department of Education. With more than thirty core faculty and more than twenty language instructors spanning twelve departments on campus, East Asian Studies remains one of Yale’s most extensive area studies programs. Its interdisciplinary emphasis encourages collaborative linkages across fields and departments and contributes to diversity across the curricula and in the classroom. Approximately one hundred fifty courses on East Asia in the humanities and social sciences are offered each year.

CEAS administers Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and Master of Arts (M.A.) programs. The M.A. program focuses on Chinese, Japanese, and East Asian transnational studies. For details on the M.A. program, see the section on East Asian Studies, under Degree-Granting Departments in this bulletin.

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European Studies Council

The MacMillan Center

342 Luce Hall, 203.432.3423

www.yale.edu/macmillan/europeanstudies

Graduate Certificate of Concentration in European Studies

Chair

Francesca Trivellato (History)

Faculty and Participating Staff

For faculty listings, see the section on European and Russian Studies under Degree-Granting Departments and Programs in this bulletin.

The European Studies Council formulates and implements new curricular and research programs on European politics, culture, economy, society, and history. The geographical scope of the council’s activities extends from Ireland to the lands of the former Soviet Union. Its concept of Europe transcends the conventional divisions into Western, Central, and Eastern Europe, and includes the Balkans and Russia. In 2010 the U.S. Department of Education again designated the council a National Resource Center under its HEA Title VI program.

The European Studies Council builds on existing programmatic strengths at Yale while serving as a catalyst for the development of new initiatives. Yale’s current resources in European Studies are vast and include the activities of many members of the faculty who have teaching and research specialties in the area. Such departments as Comparative Literature, Economics, English, History, History of Art, Political Science, Slavic Languages and Literatures, and Sociology regularly offer courses with a European focus. These are complemented by the rich offerings and faculty strength of the French, German, Italian, Slavic, and Spanish and Portuguese language and literature departments, as well as the European resources available in the professional schools and other programs, such as Film Studies. By coordinating Yale’s existing resources, including those in the professional schools, encouraging individual and group research, and promoting an integrated comparative curriculum and degree programs, the council strongly supports the disciplinary and interdisciplinary study of European regions and their interactions. The council is also home to special programs in European Union Studies, British Studies, Baltic Studies, and Hellenic Studies, and to initiatives in Polish Culture and Dutch.

In addition to the M.A. degree program, the council offers students in the University’s doctoral and other professional degree programs the chance to obtain a Graduate Certificate of Concentration in European Studies by fulfilling a supplementary curriculum. The undergraduate major in Russian and East European Studies is administered by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.

The benefits provided to the Yale community by the European Studies Council include not only its status as an HEA Title VI National Resource Center, but also its affiliation with interuniversity and international organizations that can offer specialized training programs and research grants for graduate students (see http://studentgrants. yale.edu), support conferences among European and American scholars, and subsidize European visitors to Yale. The Fox International Fellowship Program, for example, offers generous fellowship support to qualified students who undertake research at specified institutions in the United Kingdom, Germany, France, and Russia. Furthermore, the council supplements the regular Yale curriculum with lectures and seminars by eminent European and American scholars, diplomats, and political officials. The European Studies Council is now pursuing formal links with a variety of European institutions and each year hosts a European Union Fellow sponsored by the European Commission.

Fields of Study

European and Slavic languages and literatures; economics; history; music; political science; law; sociology and other social sciences.

Graduate Certificate of Concentration in European Studies

Yale students may pursue the Graduate Certificate of Concentration in European Studies in conjunction with graduate-degree programs in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and the professional schools. Candidates will specify as an area of primary focus either (1) Russia and Eastern Europe or (2) Central and Western Europe. Admission is contingent on the candidate’s acceptance into a Yale graduate-degree program. To complete the certificate, candidates must demonstrate expertise in the area through their major graduate or professional field, as well as show command of the diverse interdisciplinary, geographic, and cultural-linguistic approaches associated with expertise in the area of concentration. Award of the certificate, beyond fulfilling the relevant requirements, is contingent on successful completion of the candidate’s Yale University degree program.

Certificate candidates must comply with the general requirements for all MacMillan Center graduate certificates, as described at www.yale.edu/macmillan/grad_certificates.htm.

Additional Requirements Specific to European Studies

  • 1. Minimum L4 language proficiency in two modern European languages, in addition to English. Students wishing to focus on Russia and Eastern Europe must demonstrate knowledge of Russian or an Eastern European language; those focusing on Central and Western Europe must demonstrate knowledge of one of the appropriate languages. Students must demonstrate proficiency in oral (speaking/listening), reading, and writing skills.
  • 2. Six courses in the area of concentration, of which:
  • a. three courses must offer transnational approaches to Europe-related issues, and
  • b. of the remaining three courses, students focusing on Russia and Eastern Europe must take at least one course concerning the nations of Central and Western Europe. For those focusing on Central and Western Europe, at least one course must concern Russia and Eastern Europe.
  • 3. Interdisciplinary research paper written either:
  • a. in the context of one of the six courses in the area of concentration, or
  • b. as independent work under faculty supervision, replacing one of the six required courses.

A qualifying research paper is required to demonstrate field-specific research ability focused on the area of concentration. After they have completed substantial course work in the area, students must seek approval from the council faculty adviser for the research project they propose as the qualifying paper. Normally, students will submit their proposals no later than the fourth week of the term in which they plan to submit the qualifying paper.

For course listings, see European and Russian Studies under Degree-Granting Departments and Programs in this bulletin.

For more information, write to European Studies Council, Yale University, PO Box 208206, New Haven CT 06520-8206; or call 203.432.3423.

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Jackson Institute for Global Affairs

The MacMillan Center

137 Rosenkranz Hall, 203.432.3418

http://jackson.yale.edu/certificates

Graduate Certificate of Concentration in Development Studies

Graduate Certificate of Concentration in Global Health

Graduate Certificate of Concentration in International Security Studies

Director

James Levinsohn (Global Affairs; Management)

Faculty

For faculty listings, see the section on Global Affairs under Degree-Granting Departments and Programs in this bulletin.

Graduate Certificate of Concentration in Development Studies

The Graduate Certificate of Concentration in Development Studies provides recognition that a graduate or professional student at Yale has completed interdisciplinary study and integrative research to address fundamental and applied economic, political, social, and cultural issues facing developing countries.

The certificate in Development Studies may be pursued only in conjunction with graduate degree programs in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and the professional schools. Students who enroll in the Jackson Institute’s M.A. program in fall 2012 or later are not eligible for this certificate. The certificate allows students to develop and demonstrate their competence in this interdisciplinary field. Award of the certificate, beyond fulfilling the relevant requirements, is contingent on the successful completion of the candidate’s Yale University degree program. The Development Studies faculty adviser may set a limit on the number of applicants accepted into this certificate program in any given year.

The certificate courses and research should be planned, in consultation with the Development Studies faculty adviser, to clearly demonstrate fulfillment of the goals of the Development Studies certificate. The application deadline is November 15 each year.

Requirements
  • 1. Six courses in the area of Development Studies. Each year, the Development Studies faculty adviser will provide a list of courses that will count toward the six-course requirement. This list will draw primarily on Graduate School offerings in economics, political science, history, global affairs, anthropology, and sociology, and on courses at the professional schools, including Forestry & Environmental Studies, Law, Management, and Public Health. Candidates may petition the faculty adviser to have other relevant courses count.
  • 2. Candidates must demonstrate proficiency in one relevant language other than English. The language should be either a major world language relevant to development studies or the language of the region on which the candidate is focusing.
  • 3. Candidates must demonstrate proficiency in the basic concepts of economic analysis, either by demonstrating substantial prior course work in economics or by taking a graduate- or professional-level economics course at Yale. Such a course may count toward the certificate with the approval of the faculty adviser.
  • 4. Candidates must write a substantial research paper. The paper must demonstrate the ability to use interdisciplinary resources in development studies, including, where appropriate, primary sources, field research, data analysis, and non-English sources.

Graduate Certificate of Concentration in Global Health

Graduate and professional students at Yale may pursue the Graduate Certificate of Concentration in Global Health as part of their degree program. M.P.H. students enrolled in the Global Health Concentration at Yale School of Public Health are not eligible for this certificate. This certificate allows students to develop expertise and demonstrate competence in Global Health and provides recognition that a student has completed interdisciplinary study and integrative research to address fundamental and applied economic, political, social, cultural, and scientific issues relevant to Global Health.

Students are expected, in consultation with the Global Health faculty adviser, to develop a coherent plan of courses and research that focuses on a specific significant Global Health issue that requires an interdisciplinary perspective (e.g., health and human rights, the worldwide obesity epidemic, economic development and tropical diseases). Often this focal issue will be studied in the context of a particular region of the world (e.g., East Asia, Latin America, sub-Saharan Africa) or comparatively across countries or regions.

We expect that students pursuing the certificate will engage with the community of scholars and practitioners working on Global Health at Yale and around the world, demonstrating the ability and cultural sensitivity to work with them in languages beyond English. Overseas field experience in Global Health is also highly desirable. The application deadline is November 15 each year. Master’s students in particular are advised to apply during the fall term of their first year.

Requirements
  • 1. Six courses in the area of Global Health. Each year, the Global Health faculty adviser will provide a list of courses that will count toward the six-course requirement. Candidates must work with the adviser to organize their course selections around their chosen focal issue within Global Health. Two courses must be from the School of Public Health, one of which must provide a broad-based foundation in epidemiology.
  • 2. Candidates must demonstrate proficiency in one relevant language other than English. The language should be either a major world language relevant to global health or one of the main working languages of the region on which the candidate is focusing.
  • 3. Candidates must write a substantial, interdisciplinary research paper. The paper must demonstrate the ability to use interdisciplinary resources in global health, including, where appropriate, field research, primary sources, data analysis, and non-English sources.

Graduate Certificate of Concentration in International Security Studies

The Graduate Certificate of Concentration in International Security Studies provides recognition that a graduate or professional student at Yale has completed interdisciplinary study and integrative research to address fundamental and applied economic, political, social, and cultural issues relevant to the study of international security.

The certificate in International Security Studies may be pursued only in conjunction with graduate degree programs in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and the professional schools. Students who enroll in the Jackson Institute’s M.A. program in fall 2012 or later are not eligible for this certificate. The certificate allows students to develop and demonstrate their competence in this interdisciplinary field. Award of the certificate, beyond fulfilling the relevant requirements, is contingent on successful completion of the candidate’s Yale University degree program. The International Security Studies faculty adviser may set a limit on the number of applicants accepted into this certificate program in any given year.

The certificate courses and research should be planned, in consultation with the International Security Studies faculty adviser, to clearly demonstrate fulfillment of the goals of the International Security Studies certificate. The application deadline is November 15 each year.

Requirements
  • 1. Six courses in the area of International Security. Each year, the International Security Studies faculty adviser will provide a list of courses that will count toward the six-course requirement. This list will draw primarily on Graduate School offerings in anthropology, economics, history, global affairs, political science, and sociology, and on courses at the professional schools, including Forestry & Environmental Studies, Law, Management, and Public Health. Candidates may petition the faculty adviser to have other relevant courses count.
  • One of these six courses must have a core focus on international security issues. The International Security Studies faculty adviser will provide a list of courses each year that meet this requirement.
  • Up to three courses may focus on a particular region.
  • 2. Candidates must demonstrate proficiency in one relevant language other than English. The language should be either a major world language relevant to international security studies or the language of the region on which the candidate is focusing.
  • 3. Candidates must write a substantial research paper. The paper must demonstrate the ability to use interdisciplinary resources in international security studies, including, where appropriate, primary sources, field research, data analysis, and non-English sources.

For more information, visit http://www.yale.edu/macmillan/grad_certificates.htm, e-mail jackson.institute@yale.edu, or call 203.432.3418.

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Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies

The MacMillan Center

232 Luce Hall, 203.432.3422

www.yale.edu/macmillan/lais

Graduate Certificate of Concentration in Latin American and Iberian Studies

Chair

Stuart Schwartz (History)

Professors Rolena Adorno (Spanish & Portuguese), Ned Blackhawk (History; American Studies), Richard Burger (Anthropology), Hazel Carby (African American Studies; American Studies), Carlos Eire (History; Religious Studies), Eduardo Engel (Economics), Paul Freedman (History), Aníbal González (Spanish & Portuguese), Roberto González Echevarría (Spanish & Portuguese), K. David Jackson (Spanish & Portuguese), Gilbert Joseph (History), Efstathios Kalyvas (Political Science), Mary Miller (History of Art), Florencia Montagnini (Forestry & Environmental Studies), Stephen Pitti (History), Susan Rose-Ackerman (Law; Political Science), Alicia Schmidt-Camacho (American Studies), T. Paul Schultz (Economics), Stuart Schwartz (History), Susan Stokes (Political Science), Robert Thompson (History of Art), Noël Valis (Spanish & Portuguese), Elisabeth Wood (Political Science)

Associate Professors Jafari Allen (Anthropology; African American Studies), Robert Bailis (Forestry & Environmental Studies), Susan Byrne (Spanish & Portuguese), Rodrigo Canales (Management), Ana De La O Torres (Political Science), Moira Fradinger (Comparative Literature), Paulo Moreira (Spanish & Portuguese)

Assistant Professors Ryan Bennett (Linguistics), Sean Brotherton (Anthropology), Oswaldo Chinchilla (Anthropology), Marcela Echeverri (History), Anne Eller (History), Leslie Harkema (Spanish & Portuguese), Kevin Poole (Spanish & Portuguese)

Senior Lectors I, II (Spanish & Portuguese) Sybil Alexandrov, Marta Almeida, Maria Pilar Asensio-Manrique, Teresa Carballal, Mercedes Carreras, Ame Cividanes, Sebastián Díaz, Maria de La Paz García, Oscar González-Barreto, María Jordán, Rosamaría León, Juliana Ramos-Ruano, Lissette Reymundi, Lourdes Sabé, Barbara Safille, Terry Seymour, Margherita Tortora, Sonia Valle, Selma Vital

Others Jane Edwards (Associate Dean, Yale College), Jana Krentz (Curator, Latin American Collection, Library), Nancy Ruther (Lecturer, Political Science)

Professors Emeriti Garry Brewer (Forestry & Environmental Studies), Emilia Viotti da Costa (History), Juan Linz (Political Science; Sociology), Josefina Ludmer (Spanish & Portuguese), Enrique Mayer (Anthropology), Gustav Ranis (Economics)

A variety of Latin American Studies options are available for graduate students in history and other humanities disciplines, the social sciences, and the professional schools. Latin American Area course offerings are available in twenty-five disciplines with distinct strengths in Anthropology, History, Political Science, and Spanish and Portuguese. Latin Americanist faculty specialize in the Andes (Burger), Brazil (Jackson, Moreira, Schwartz), the Caribbean (Carby, Thompson), Central America (Chinchilla, Joseph, Miller, Wood), Cuba (Allen, Brotherton), Mexico (Bailis, Camacho, Canales, De La O Torres, Joseph, Miller, Pitti), and the Southern Cone (Engel, Fradinger, Stokes). F&ES faculty (Ashton, Bell, Berlyn, Clark, Dove, Gentry, Mendelsohn, Montagnini) have tropical research interests or participate in educational exchanges with Argentina, Brazil, Costa Rica, Dominica, Ecuador, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, and Venezuela. Latin American content courses are also offered in the Schools of Law, Management, and Public Health.

Students may pursue the Graduate Certificate of Concentration in Latin American and Iberian Studies in conjunction with graduate degree programs in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and the professional schools. To complete the certificate, candidates must demonstrate expertise in the area through their major graduate or professional field, as well as show command of the diverse interdisciplinary, geographic, cultural, and linguistic approaches associated with expertise in Latin America or Iberia.

Admission is contingent on the candidate’s acceptance into a Yale graduate degree program, and award of the certificate, beyond fulfilling the relevant requirements, requires the successful completion of the candidate’s Yale University degree program. Active participation in the council’s extracurricular and research programs and seminars is also strongly encouraged.

Limited financial resources, such as the LAIS Summer Research grants and Tinker Field Research grants, are available to graduate and professional school students for summer research.

Specific Requirements for the Graduate Certificate of Concentration

Language proficiency The equivalent of two years’ study of one language and one year of the other, normally Spanish and Portuguese. Less frequently taught languages, such as Nahuatl, Quechua, or Haitian Creole, may also be considered for meeting this requirement.

Course work Six graduate courses in at least two different disciplines. No more than four courses may count in any one discipline.

Geographical and disciplinary coverage At least two countries and two languages must be included in the course work or thesis.

Research A major graduate course research paper or thesis that demonstrates the ability to use field resources, ideally in one or more languages of the region, normally with a focus on a comparative or regional topic rather than a single country.

The certificate adviser of the Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies will assist graduate students in designing a balanced and coordinated curriculum. The council will provide course lists and other useful materials.

Academic Resources of the Council

The council supplements the graduate curriculum with annual lecture and film series, special seminars, and conferences that bring visiting scholars and experts to campus. The council also serves as a communications and information center for a vast variety of enriching events in Latin American studies sponsored by the other departments, schools, and independent groups at Yale. It is a link between Yale and Latin American centers in other universities, and between Yale and educational programs in Latin America and Iberia.

The Latin American Collection of the University library has approximately 556,000 volumes printed in Latin America, plus newspapers and microfilms, CD-ROMs, films, sound recordings, and maps. The library’s Latin American Manuscript Collection is one of the finest in the United States for unpublished documents for the study of Latin American history. Having the oldest among the major Latin American collections in the United States, Yale offers research opportunities unavailable elsewhere.

Information about the Graduate Certificate of Concentration in Latin American Studies may be requested from the Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies, Yale University, PO Box 208206, New Haven CT 06520-8206; e-mail, jean.silk@yale.edu; or telephone, 203.432.3422.

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Council on Middle East Studies

The MacMillan Center

346 Rosenkranz Hall, 203.436.2553

www.yale.edu/macmillan/cmes

Graduate Certificate of Concentration in Modern Middle East Studies

Chair

Frank Griffel (Religious Studies)

Professors Abbas Amanat (History), Harold Attridge (Divinity), Gerhard Böwering (Religious Studies), Adela Yarbro Collins (Divinity; on leave [F]), John J. Collins (Divinity), John Darnell (Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations; on leave [F]), Stephen Davis (Religious Studies), Owen Fiss (Emeritus, Law), Benjamin Foster (Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations), Steven Fraade (Religious Studies), Eckart Frahm (Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations), Frank Griffel (Religious Studies), Beatrice Gruendler (Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations), Dimitri Gutas (Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations), Christine Hayes (Religious Studies), Frank Hole (Emeritus, Anthropology), Marcia Inhorn (Anthropology; on leave [F]), Anthony Kronman (Law), Bentley Layton (Religious Studies), J.G. Manning (Classics), Ivan Marcus (History), Alain Mikhail (History), Robert Nelson (History of Art; on leave [Sp]), W. Michael Reisman (Law), Maurice Samuels (French), Lamin Sanneh (Divinity), Harvey Weiss (Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations), Robert Wilson (Divinity)

Associate Professors Kaveh Khoshnood (Public Health; on leave), Ellen Lust (Political Science), Colleen Manassa (Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations), Andrew March (Political Science), Ahmed Mobarak (Economics), Kishwar Rizvi (History of Art)

Assistant Professors Narges Erami (Anthropology), Zareena Grewal (American Studies), Adria Lawrence (Political Science), Mark Lazenby (Nursing), Jonathan Wyrtzen (Sociology)

Senior Lecturers and Lecturers Adel Allouche (History; Religious Studies), Karla Britton (Architecture), Karen Foster (Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations; History of Art), Tolga Köker (Economics), Kathryn Slanski (Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations)

Senior Lectors (I, II) and Lectors Sarab Al Ani (Arabic), Muhammad Aziz (Arabic), Aaron Butts (Semitics), Ayala Dvoretzky (Hebrew), Moulay Youness Elbousty (Arabic), Etem Erol (Turkish), Shiri Goren (Hebrew), Dina Roginsky (Hebrew), Farkhondeh Shayesteh (Persian), Hasmik Tovmasyan (Arabic)

Librarians and Curators Roberta Dougherty (Near East Collection), Ulla Kasten (Babylonian Collection), Susan Matheson (Ancient Art, Yale University Art Gallery), Elizabeth Payne (Babylonian Collection), Nanette Stahl (Judaica Collection)

The Council on Middle East Studies is part of the Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies. The council brings together faculty and students sharing an interest in the Middle East by sponsoring conferences, discussions, films, and lecture series by scholars from Yale as well as visiting scholars. It provides information concerning grants, fellowships, research programs, and foreign study opportunities. It also administers research projects in a variety of Middle East-related areas.

In addition to the resources of the individual departments, Yale’s library system has much to offer the student interested in Middle East studies. Of particular note are the collections of Arabic and Persian manuscripts, as well as large holdings on the medieval and modern Middle East.

The Council on Middle East Studies administers the Middle East Studies National Resource Center at Yale, which is funded by the U.S. Department of Education under HEA Title VI. As a National Resource Center, the council supports a number of projects and activities, including summer- and academic-year language fellowships and an extensive outreach program.

The council also offers a Graduate Certificate of Concentration in Modern Middle East Studies. Students with an interest in the Middle East should first apply to one of the University’s degree-granting departments, such as Anthropology, History, Linguistics, Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, Political Science, Religious Studies, or Sociology, and then apply for the graduate certificate of concentration no later than the beginning of their penultimate term of study.

Graduate Certificate of Concentration in Modern Middle East Studies

The certificate represents acknowledgment of substantial preparation in Middle East Studies, both in the student’s major graduate or professional field and also in terms of the disciplinary and geographical diversity required by the council for recognized competency in the field of Middle East Studies. As language and culture are the core of the area studies concept, students are required to attain or demonstrate language proficiency.

Requirements
  • 1. Language proficiency: the equivalent of two years of study at a passing grade in one of the four languages of the Middle East—Arabic, Hebrew, Persian, and Turkish.
  • 2. Course work: six graduate courses in at least two different disciplines. No more than four courses may count in any one discipline. Included in these six courses must be an introductory Middle East history course, such as State and Society and Culture in the Middle East (taken with special supplemental graduate readings and assignments), and a foundations course, such as Culture and Politics in the Contemporary Middle East.
  • 3. Interdisciplinary coverage: both courses and any research project undertaken in lieu of a course must reflect experience of at least two disciplines.
  • 4. Research: a major graduate course research paper, dissertation prospectus, dissertation, or thesis that demonstrates ability to use field resources, ideally in one or more languages of the region.

For more information on the Graduate Certificate and inquiries about Middle East Studies, contact the Council on Middle East Studies, Yale University, PO Box 208206, New Haven CT 06520-8206, or the council e-mail, cmes@yale.edu.

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South Asian Studies Council

The MacMillan Center

210 Luce Hall, 203.436.3517

www.yale.edu/macmillan/southasia

Chair

Kalyanakrishnan Sivaramakrishnan (Anthropology)

Professors Tim Barringer (History of Art), Vasudha Dalmia (Religious Studies), Michael Dove (Forestry & Environmental Studies), Phyllis Granoff (Religious Studies), Inderpal Grewal (Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies), Gustav Ranis (Emeritus, Economics), Kalyanakrishnan Sivaramakrishnan (Anthropology), Shyam Sunder (School of Management), Christopher Udry (Economics), Steven Wilkinson (Political Science)

Associate Professors Nihal deLanerolle (School of Medicine), Karuna Mantena (Political Science), Kishwar Rizvi (History of Art), Sarah Weiss (Music)

Assistant Professors Ashwini Deo (Linguistics), Mayur Desai (Psychiatry/VAMC), Ravi Durvasula (School of Medicine), Zareena Grewal (American Studies; Religious Studies), Daniel Keniston (Economics), Alan Mikhail (History), Shital Pravinchandra (English), Andrew Quintman (Religious Studies), Tamara Sears (History of Art), Sara Shneiderman (Anthropology), Tariq Thachil (Political Science)

Senior Lecturers Geetanjali Singh Chanda (Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies), Koichi Shinohara (Religious Studies)

Lecturers Harry Blair (Political Science), Carol Carpenter (Forestry & Environmental Studies), Hugh Flick (Religious Studies), El Mokhtar Ghambou (English)

Senior Lector Seema Khurana (Hindi)

Lectors David Brick (Sanskrit), Swapna Sharma (Hindi)

Associate Research Scholar Mark Turin (South Asian Studies Council)

Students with an interest in South Asian Studies should apply to one of the University’s degree-granting departments, such as Anthropology, History, Political Science, Economics, or Religious Studies. The South Asian Studies Council is part of the MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies. It has been organized to provide guidance to graduate students who desire to use the resources of the departments of the University that offer South Asia-related courses.

The South Asian Studies Council aims to bring together faculty and students sharing an interest in South Asia, and it supplements the curriculum with seminars, conferences, and special lectures by scholars from Yale as well as visiting scholars. It provides information concerning grants, fellowships, research programs, and foreign study opportunities.

Language instruction is offered in Hindi and Tamil. Students planning to undertake field research or language study in South Asia may apply to the council for summer fellowship support.

For information and program materials, contact the South Asian Studies Council, Yale University, PO Box 208206, New Haven CT 06520-8206; or see www.yale.edu/macmillan/southasia.

Courses

HNDI 510au, Elementary Hindi Seema Khurana, Swapna Sharma

An in-depth introduction to modern Hindi, including the Devanagari script. Through a combination of graded texts, written assignments, audiovisual material, and computer-based exercises, the course provides cultural insights and increases proficiency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Hindi. Emphasis placed on spontaneous self-expression in the language. No prior background in Hindi assumed.

510a-1: MTWTHF 10:30–11:20

510a-2: MTWTHF 1:30–2:20

HNDI 520bu, Elementary Hindi II Seema Khurana, Swapna Sharma

Continuation of HNDI 510a.

520b-1: MWF 10:30–11:20, TTH 1:30–2:20

520b-2: MWF 1:30–2:20, TTH 10:30–11:20

HNDI 530au, Intermediate Hindi I Seema Khurana, Swapna Sharma

First half of a two-term sequence designed to develop proficiency in the four language skill areas. Extensive use of cultural documents including feature films, radio broadcasts, and literary and nonliterary texts to increase proficiency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Hindi. Focus on cultural nuances and various Hindi literary traditions. Emphasis on spontaneous self-expression in the language. Prerequisite: HNDI 520b or equivalent.

530a-1: MTWTHF 2:30–3:20

530a-2: MTWTHF 11:30–12:20

HNDI 532aU, Hindi for Heritage Speakers I Swapna Sharma

TTH 4–5:15

HNDI 540bu, Intermediate Hindi II Seema Khurana, Swapna Sharma

Continuation of HNDI 530a, focusing on further development of proficiency in the four language skill areas. Prerequisite: HNDI 530a or equivalent.

540b-1: MWF 2:30–3:20

540b-2: TTH 9:30–10:20

HNDI 542bU, Hindi for Heritage Speakers II Swapna Sharma, Seema Khurana

Continuation of HNDI 532a. Development of increased proficiency in the four language skills. Focus on reading and higher language functions such as narration, description, and comparison. Reading strategies for parsing paragraph-length sentences in Hindi newspapers. Discussion of political, social, and cultural dimensions of Hindi culture as well as contemporary global issues. Prerequisite: HNDI 532a or equivalent. TTH 4–5:15

HNDI 550au, Advanced Hindi Seema Khurana

An advanced language course aimed at enabling students to engage in fluent discourse in Hindi and to achieve a comprehensive knowledge of formal grammar. Introduction to a variety of styles and levels of discourse and usage. Emphasis on the written language, with readings on general topics from newspapers, books, and magazines. Prerequisite: HNDI 540b or permission of instructor. TTH 4–5:15

HNDI 598au or bu, Advanced Tutorial 

For students with advanced Hindi language skills who wish to engage in concentrated reading and research on material not otherwise offered by the department. The work must be supervised by an adviser and must terminate in a term paper or its equivalent. Prerequisites: HNDI 540b, and submission of a detailed project proposal and its approval by the language studies coordinator. 1 HTBA

SKRT 510aU/LING 515aU, Introductory Sanskrit I David Brick

An introduction to Sanskrit language and grammar. Focus on learning to read and translate basic Sanskrit sentences in the Indian Devanagari script. No prior background in Sanskrit assumed. Credit only on completion of SKRT 520b/LING 525b. MTWTHF 9:25–10:15

SKRT 520bU/LING 525bU, Introductory Sanskrit II David Brick

Continuation of SKRT 510a/LING 515a. Focus on the basics of Sanskrit grammar; readings from classical Sanskrit texts written in the Indian Devanagari script. Prerequisite: SKRT 510a/LING 515a. TTH 9:25–10:15, MWF 10:30–11:20

SKRT 530aU, Intermediate Sanskrit I David Brick

The first half of a two-term sequence aimed at helping students develop the skills necessary to read texts written in Sanskrit. Readings include selections from the Hitopadesa; Kathasaritsagara; Mahabharata; and Bhagavad Gita. Prerequisite: SKRT 520b or equivalent. MTWTHF 10:30–11:20

SKRT 540bU, Intermediate Sanskrit II David Brick

Continuation of SKRT 530a, focusing on Sanskrit literature from the kavya genre. Readings include selections from the Jatakamala of Aryasura and the opening verses of Kalidasa’s Kumarasambhava. Prerequisite: SKRT 530a or equivalent. MTWTHF 10:30–11:20

SAST 556b/HSAR 798b, Landscapes in Southern Asia Tamara Sears

From prehistoric cave paintings to recent performance art, landscape has been the site and subject of artistic creation throughout the history of Southern Asia. As sites, landscapes have been carved into monumental complexes and fashioned into sacred geographies and practical cartographies that have been mapped by pilgrimage, commerce, agrarian expansion, and conquest. As subjects, they have been urban and rural places filled with wonder, longing, power, and danger. As imagined spaces, landscapes held the potential to collapse mythic and historic time, to facilitate new encounters, and to cultivate a range of social relations and human emotion responses. This seminar explores the representation and reshaping of landscape in South and Southeast Asia across a range of historical periods and through a variety of media. We experiment with different theoretical frameworks from a variety of fields, both from within art history, as well as within literature, religion, anthropology, and environmental science. As much as possible, we work with Yale’s museum collections, which house a wide diversity of photographs, paintings, drawings, prints, maps, and textiles. TH 1:30–3:20

SAST 567b/RLST 583bU, Biography in Asian Religions Andrew Quintman

The significance of life writing in the religious traditions of Asia. Readings both from primary texts in translation and from theoretical works on biography and autobiography. W 1:30–3:20

SAST 558a/RLST 588a, Early Modern Spiritual Biographies in Hindi  Vasudha Dalmia

We begin with a detailed reading of Ardhakathanaka (Half a Tale, 1641), an early modern Jaina life-story set in Jaunpur and Agra. In order to bring out and appreciate the features peculiar to this text, we juxtapose it with a selection of Vaishnava hagiographies, compiled in their present form in the eighteenth century. M 1:30–3:20

SAST 569bU/ANTH 553bU, Himalayan Languages and Cultures Mark Turin

Exploration of social, linguistic, and political aspects of the Himalayan region. Issues include classifications of communities and their languages; census-taking and other state enumeration projects; the crisis of endangered oral cultures and speech forms; the creation and adoption of writing systems and the challenges of developing mother tongue literacy materials. Case studies are drawn from Bhutan, northern India, Nepal, and Tibet. T 3:30–5:20

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Council on Southeast Asia Studies

The MacMillan Center

311 Luce Hall, 203.432.3431, seas@yale.edu

www.yale.edu/seas

Chair

To be announced

Professors Michael Dove (Forestry & Environmental Studies), J. Joseph Errington (Anthropology), Benedict Kiernan (History), James Scott (Political Science), Mimi Hall Yiengpruksawan (History of Art)

Associate Professor Sarah Weiss (Music)

Assistant Professor Erik Harms (Anthropology)

Lecturers and Lectors (I, II) Dinny Risri Aletheiani (Southeast Asian Languages), Carol Carpenter (Forestry & Environmental Studies), Amity Doolittle (Forestry & Environmental Studies), Quang Phu Van (Southeast Asian Languages), Indriyo Sukmono (Southeast Asian Languages)

Curators Ruth Barnes (Indo-Pacific Art, Yale University Art Gallery), Richard Richie (Southeast Asia Collection, Yale University Library)

Yale does not offer higher degrees in Southeast Asia Studies. Instead, students apply for admission to one of the regular degree-granting departments and turn to the Council on Southeast Asia Studies for guidance regarding the development of their special area interest, courses outside their department, and instruction in Southeast Asian languages related to their research interest. The council aims to bring together faculty and students sharing an interest in Southeast Asia and supplements the graduate curriculum with an annual seminar series, periodic conferences, and special lectures.

Yale offers extensive library and research collections on Southeast Asia in Sterling Memorial Library, the Economic Growth Center, the Peabody Museum of Natural History, and the Human Relations Area Files. Further information on library resources is available from Richard Richie, Curator, Southeast Asia Collection, Sterling Memorial Library (203.432.1858, rich.richie@yale.edu).

Language instruction is offered in two Southeast Asian languages, Indonesian and Vietnamese. The council supports language tables and tutoring in other Southeast Asian languages by special arrangement. Students planning to undertake field research or language study in Southeast Asia may apply to the council for summer fellowship support.

For information on program activities and participating faculty, contact the Council on Southeast Asia Studies, Yale University, PO Box 208206, New Haven CT 06520-8206; or see our Web site, www.yale.edu/seas.

Courses

INDN 510aU, Elementary Indonesian I Indriyo Sukmono, Dinny Risri Aletheiani

An introductory course in Standard Indonesian with emphasis on developing communicative skills through systematic survey of grammar and graded exercises. Introduction to reading in the second term, leading to mastery of language patterns, essential vocabulary, and basic cultural competence. Enrollment limited to fifteen per section. (01) MTWTHF 9:25–10:15; (02) MTWTHF 10:30–11:20; (03) MTWTHF 1:30–2:20

INDN 520bU, Elementary Indonesian II Indriyo Sukmono, Dinny Risri Aletheiani

Continuation of INDN 510a. (01) MTWTHF 9:25–10:15; (02) MTWTHF 10:30–11:20; (03) MTWTHF 1:30–2:20

INDN 530aU, Intermediate Indonesian I Indriyo Sukmono, Dinny Risri Aletheiani

Continues practice in colloquial Indonesian conversation and reading and discussion of texts. Prerequisite: INDN 520b or equivalent. Enrollment limited. (01) TTH 11:30–12:50; (02) MF 11:30–12:50

INDN 540bU, Intermediate Indonesian II Indriyo Sukmono, Dinny Risri Aletheiani

Continuation of INDN 530a. (01) TTH 11:30–12:50; (02) MF 11:30–12:50

INDN 550aU, Advanced Indonesian I Indriyo Sukmono, Dinny Risri Aletheiani

Development of advanced fluency through sophisticated discussion of a variety of original Indonesian sociohistorical, political, and literary texts and audiovisual sources designed to challenge students to apply and extend their knowledge and understanding of Indonesia. Prerequisites: INDN 540b or equivalent and permission of the instructor.

INDN 560bU, Advanced Indonesian II Indriyo Sukmono, Dinny Risri Aletheiani

Continued development of advanced fluency through sophisticated discussion of original Indonesian sociohistorical, political, and literary texts and audiovisual sources designed to challenge students to further apply and extend their knowledge and understanding of Indonesia. Prerequisites: INDN 550a or equivalent and permission of the instructor. TTH 2:30–3:45

INDN 570a/b, Readings in Indonesian Indriyo Sukmono, Dinny Risri Aletheiani

For students with advanced Indonesian language skills preparing for academic performance and/or research purposes. Prerequisites: advanced Indonesian and permission of the instructor.

VIET 510aU, Elementary Vietnamese I Quang Phu Van

Students acquire basic working ability in Vietnamese including sociocultural knowledge. Attention to integrated skills such as speaking, listening, writing (Roman script), and reading. No previous knowledge of or experience with Vietnamese language required. MTWTHF 9:25–10:15

VIET 520bU, Elementary Vietnamese II Quang Phu Van

Continuation of VIET 510a. MTWTHF 9:25–10:15

VIET 530aU, Intermediate Vietnamese I Quang Phu Van

An integrated approach to language learning aimed at strengthening students’ listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Vietnamese. Students are thoroughly grounded in communicative activities such as conversations, performance simulation, drills, role playing, and games. Discussion of aspects of Vietnamese society and culture. Prerequisite: VIET 520b or equivalent. MTWTHF 10:30–11:20

VIET 540bU, Intermediate Vietnamese II Quang Phu Van

Continuation of VIET 530a. MTWTHF 10:30–11:20

VIET 550aU, Advanced Vietnamese Quang Phu Van

Aims to enable students to achieve greater fluency and accuracy in the language beyond the intermediate level and to solidify their reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. Topics include social, economic, and cultural practices; gender issues; and notions of power, taboo, etc. Prerequisite: VIET 540b or equivalent. TH 4–5:15

VIET 570b, Readings in Vietnamese Quang Phu Van

For students with advanced Vietnamese language skills who wish to engage in concentrated reading and research. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

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Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

315 William L. Harkness Hall, 203.432.0845

http://wgss.yale.edu

Chair

Inderpal Grewal

Director of Graduate Studies

Jill Campbell

Professors Elizabeth Alexander (African American Studies), Carol Armstrong (History of Art), Seyla Benhabib (Political Science), Jill Campbell (English), Hazel Carby (African American Studies; American Studies), Kang-i Sun Chang (East Asian Languages & Literatures), George Chauncey (History), Kamari Clarke (Anthropology), Glenda Gilmore (History; American Studies; African American Studies), Inderpal Grewal (Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies; American Studies; Anthropology), Dolores Hayden (Architecture; American Studies), Margaret Homans (English; Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies), Marianne LaFrance (Psychology; Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies), Kathryn Lofton (American Studies; Religious Studies), Joanne Meyerowitz (History), Sally Promey (American Studies; Institute of Sacred Music; Religious Studies), Cynthia Russett (History), Alicia Schmidt Camacho (American Studies), Emilie Townes (Divinity), John Treat (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Michael Warner (English), Laura Wexler (American Studies; Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies)

Associate Professors Jafari Allen (African American Studies; Anthropology), Moira Fradinger (Comparative Literature), Karen Nakamura (Anthropology), Naomi Rogers (History of Science & Medicine)

Assistant Professors Rene Almeling (Sociology), Crystal Feimster (African American Studies; American Studies), Joseph Fischel (Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies), Sam See (English)

Senior Lecturers Geetanjali Singh Chanda (Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies), Kathleen Cleaver (African American Studies)

Lecturers Melanie Boyd (Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies), Maria Trumpler (Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies)

Fields of Study

The Program in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies considers gender and sexuality as fundamental categories of social and cultural analysis and offers critical perspectives upon them as a basis from which to study the diversity of human experience. Gender (the social and historical meanings of the distinction between the sexes) and sexuality (the domain of sexual practices, identities, discourses, and institutions) are studied as they intersect with class, race, ethnicity, nationality, and other axes of human difference. The introduction of these perspectives into all fields of knowledge necessitates new research, criticism of existing research, and the formulation of new paradigms and organizing concepts.

The Qualification in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies is open to students already enrolled in a Ph.D. program at Yale. Interested students are strongly encouraged to register for the Qualification by meeting with the director of graduate studies (DGS) during their first year. Students who wish to receive the Qualification must (1) complete a graduate course, approved by the DGS, on the theory of gender and sexuality; (2) complete two electives to be determined in consultation with the DGS and their individual WGSS graduate adviser; (3) demonstrate the capacity to pursue independent, interdisciplinary research in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies by presenting a qualifying paper at a meeting of the WGSS Colloquium; and (4) demonstrate readiness to teach basic and advanced courses in this field by serving as TF in a WGSS lecture course or teaching a seminar on a WGSS topic, or by preparing appropriate course syllabi. Students who fulfill these expectations will receive a letter from the DGS, indicating that they have completed the work for the Qualification.

Beginning in 2014–2015, students seeking the Qualification will also be required to complete one term of WGSS 900, WGSS Qualification Workshop.

Program information and the requirements for the Qualification are available on the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Web site, or by contacting 203.432.0845 or wgss@yale.edu.

Courses

WGSS 602bU/EALL 665bU, Homosexual Desire in East Asian Literatures John Treat

Survey of homosexual themes in traditional and modern Chinese, Japanese, and Korean literature. TH 9:25–11:15

WGSS 622bU/ARCG 623bU/NELC 620bU, Lives in Ancient Egypt Colleen Manassa

Introduction to the social history of ancient Egypt, from 3100 to 30 B.C.E., with particular focus on the lives of individuals attested in the textual and archaeological record, from pharaohs and queens to artists, soldiers, and farmers. Readings of primary sources in translation, and course projects integrating ancient objects in Yale collections. MW 11:35–12:50, 1 HTBA

[WGSS 623b/SOCY 523b, Sociology of Sex and Gender]

WGSS 629b/SOCY 543bu, Demography, Gender, and Health Vida Maralani

Comparative survey of research in demography. The interplay of population processes and socioeconomic development; trends in fertility, mortality, aging, and health in both richer and poorer nations; the relationship between women’s status and health and demographic outcomes. Readings from a variety of fields, including demography/sociology, economics, epidemiology, and public health. TH 9:25–11:15

WGSS 633b/AMST 747b/ANTH 594b, Affect and Materiality in Ethnography  Kathryn Dudley

Recent scholarship in the fields of affect studies and the new materialisms raises important questions about the ethnographic encounter and the kind of knowledge it generates. Refusing to grant ontological status to classic oppositions between Nature/Culture, Self/Other, Subject/Object, and Human/Nonhuman, this work forces anthropologically inclined ethnographers to rethink longstanding assumptions about the composition of the “social” and the “political” in an age that ignores the vulnerabilities and agential capacities of global ecosystems at its peril. Reading across ossifying disciplinary divides, this seminar examines the intellectual projects of writers such as Jacques Rancière, Gilles Deleuze, Félix Guattari, Jane Bennett, Bruno Latour, Lauren Berlant, and Kathleen Stewart among others. Our objective is to theorize the intersection between the material and the immaterial in social life in ways that bring the aesthetic and political implications of ethnography to the fore. T 1:30–3:20

WGSS 645b/AFAM 723b/AMST 645b/CPLT 949b, Caribbean Diasporic Intellectuals  Hazel Carby

This course examines work by writers of Caribbean descent from different regions of the transatlantic world. In response to contemporary interest in issues of globalization, the premise of the course is that in the world maps of these black intellectuals we can see the intertwined and interdependent histories and relations of the Americas, Europe, and Africa. Thinking globally is not a new experience for black peoples, and we need to understand the ways in which what we have come to understand and represent as “Caribbeanness” is a condition of movement. Literature is most frequently taught within the boundaries of a particular nation, but this course focuses on the work of writers who shape the Caribbean identities of their characters as traveling black subjects and refuse to restrain their fiction within the limits of any one national identity. We practice a new and global type of cognitive mapping as we read and explore the meanings of terms like black transnationalism, migrancy, globalization, and empire. Diasporic writing embraces and represents the geopolitical realities of the modern, modernizing, and postmodern worlds in which multiple racialized histories are inscribed on modern bodies. T 1:30–3:20

WGSS 650a/AMST 702a/ANTH 650a/FILM 642a, Feminist Research and the Mobility Paradigm Inderpal Grewal

The course focuses on the new theorizations of what is called “mobility theory,” which has been a strong area of research in studies of culture and globalization. This is not a course on technology but on cultures of technologies of mobility, as well as on ideas of movement, displacement, and travel. From understanding “mobile subjects” to addressing the agency of technologies of mobility within transnational networks, the course brings together a broad area of research that looks at the ways in which modernity has included conceptualizations of movement and speed and subjects have seen themselves as modern through notions of mobility and movement. We investigate these mobile modernities to understand what is seen as outside such modernity, or what are seen as problems of modernity (such as refugee movements). In doing so, the course brings an interdisciplinary feminist cultural analysis to theories of multiple and different mobilities. T 9:25–11:15

WGSS 651bU/ANTH 651bU, Intersectionality and Women’s Health Marcia Inhorn

This interdisciplinary seminar explores how the intersections of race, class, gender, and other axes of “difference” (age, sexual orientation, disability status, nation, religion) affect women’s health, primarily in the contemporary United States. Recent feminist approaches to intersectionality and multiplicity of oppressions theory are introduced. In addition, the course demonstrates how anthropologists studying women’s health issues have contributed to social and feminist theory at the intersections of race, class, and gender. M 1:30–3:30

WGSS 659bU/ANTH 655bU, Masculinity and Men’s Health Marcia Inhorn

This interdisciplinary seminar, designed for students in Anthropology; Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; and Global Health, explores in an in-depth fashion ethnographic approaches to masculinity and men’s health around the globe. The course begins with two theoretical texts on masculinity, followed by eleven anthropological ethnographies on various dimensions of men’s health and well-being. Students gain broad exposure to a number of exigent global men’s health issues, issues of ethnographic research design and methodology, and the interdisciplinary theorizing of masculinity scholars in anthropology, sociology, and cultural studies. In particular, the course demonstrates how anthropologists studying men’s health issues in a variety of Western and non-Western sites, including the Middle East, Africa, Latin America, and Asia, have contributed to both social theory and ethnographic scholarship of importance to health policy. M 3:30–5:30

WGSS 667b/HIST 667b, History of Sexuality in Modern Europe Carolyn Dean

This class provides an introduction to the various lines of inquiry informing the history of sexuality. The course asks how historians and others constitute sexuality as an object of inquiry and addresses different arguments about the evolution of sexuality in Europe, including the relationship between sexuality and the state and sexuality and gender. TH 2:30–4:20

WGSS 686a/ANTH 686aU, Digital Anthropologies Karen Nakamura

Social networks such as Facebook and Twitter and online games such as World of Warcraft have exploded in popularity in the past decade and have become a major means of social cohesion, replacing not only the telephone and postal mail, but also real-world interactions. This course explores the new worldview presented by this new tribe of digital natives from an embedded, ethnographic perspective. M 3:30–5:30

WGSS 687a/ANTH 557aU, Anthropology of the Body Sean Brotherton

Drawing on a wide and interdisciplinary range of texts, both classic and more recent, the course examines the theoretical debates of the body as a subject of anthropological, historical, psychological, medical, and literary inquiry. We explore specific themes, for example, the persistence of the mind/body dualism; experiences of embodiment/alienation; phenomenology of the body; Foucauldian notions of biopolitics, bio-power, and the ethic of the self; the medicalized body; and the gendered body, among other salient themes. W 3:30–5:20

[WGSS 689b/AFAM 647b/ANTH 591b, Black Feminist Theory and Praxis]

WGSS 698b/AFAM 511b/HSAR 698b, Fault Lines: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Contemporary Art Erica James

This seminar examines moments in which prevailing representational paradigms of race, gender, and sexuality were disrupted and transformed, affecting three-dimensional paradigm shifts in reading of race, gender, and sexuality in fine art and visual culture. Students deepen their engagement with and writing on this work beyond the ghetto of identity politics by considering multiple methods of theoretical analyses simultaneously. Sites of rupture include the art and visual culture that emerged around the figure of the boxer through Jack Johnson and Muhammad Ali; African diaspora visual poetics in the youth culture of South Africa and Jamaica; and the work of contemporary artists Kalup Linzy, Mickalene Thomas, and Iona Rozeal Brown. M 3:30–5:20

WGSS 712a/AMST 866a/HIST 775a, Readings in the History of Sexuality  George Chauncey, Joanne Meyerowitz

Selected topics in the history of sexuality. Emphasis on key theoretical works and recent historical literature. W 3:30–5:20

WGSS 715b/AFAM 829b, American Legal History: Citizenship and Race  Kathleen Cleaver

This seminar examines the evolution of U.S. citizenship as defined and interpreted by courts during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with particular attention to the way historical events that defined race have affected citizenship. Topics of study include the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution; the 1866 Civil Rights Act; Reconstruction legislation; immigration restrictions imposed on Asians; legislation impacting the racial classification of Mexicans; statutes governing the citizenship of indigenous native peoples; racially based prohibitions against voting, education, and employment; and efforts to reduce them by civil rights legislation culminating with the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Each seminar participant has to research several topics and make a presentation to the class on at least one topic. Engagement in seminar discussion and the drafting of research papers are the basis for grading. This seminar is open to seniors. TH 3:30–5:20

WGSS 720a/PLSC 720aU, Sexual Violence and War Elisabeth Wood

Analysis of patterns of sexual violence in war. Assessment of how well scholars in various disciplines and policy analysts account for these patterns.

WGSS 735a/AFAM 749a/AMST 648a, Transnational Imaginaries Hazel Carby

We traverse the boundaries of conceptual, disciplinary, historical, and theoretical imaginings of the transnational. How the transnational has been imagined is posed as a series of questions rather than as a fixed definition: for example, what constitutes the transnational; how do we think the transnational; why should we think in terms of the transnational; and what is the relation or difference among the transnational, the cosmopolitan, and globalization? We consider creative responses to the consequences of the unquenchable, demonic thirst of European and American powers for the control of trade, land, and resources, attempts to render visible what Amitav Ghosh refers to as “the results of the five hundred years of pure, undistilled violence and terror unleashed in the name of modernity.” We analyze the spatial, temporal, and historical dimensions of the creation of literary and visual narratives that seek to represent the displacement of peoples, the formation of diasporas, the invention and reinvention of subjects and subjectivities, and the politics of knowledge and power. Final paper. T 1:30–3:20

[WGSS 745bu/SOCY 610bu, Race, Gender, and the African American Experience]

WGSS 900a,b, WGSS Qualification Workshop Jill Campbell

Built around the WGSS graduate Colloquium and Working Group series, with the addition of several sessions on topics of interdisciplinary methodology, theory, and professionalization. Offered in both fall and spring. As of 2014–2015, enrollment in one term of WGSS 900 will be required of all students for completion of the Qualification in WGSS. Credit/Noncredit. For further information, contact jill.campbell@yale.edu.

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Yale Center for the Study of Globalization

Betts House, 203.432.1900, globalization@yale.edu

YCSG Web site: www.ycsg.yale.edu

YaleGlobal Online magazine: www.yaleglobal.yale.edu

Director

Ernesto Zedillo

The Yale Center for the Study of Globalization (YCSG) is devoted to examining the impact of our increasingly integrated world on individuals, communities, and nations. The center’s purpose is to support the creation and dissemination of ideas for seizing the opportunities and overcoming the challenges resulting from globalization’s impact on the world’s people and places. The center also studies problems that, even if they do not result directly from globalization, are global in nature and can therefore be effectively addressed only through international cooperation. In pursuit of this mission, and to assist in Yale’s effort to become a more international institution, the core of our strategy is collaboration both with the Yale community and with a variety of institutions and individuals across the globe.

One of the center’s strengths, and an important area of focus, is its ability to engage with multilateral institutions and global organizations in activities pertinent to its mission, thereby connecting academia with the world of public policy. Through these projects, YCSG produces reports, policy papers, and other publications that contribute toward influencing the attitudes and actions of policy makers, academics, and institutions. Natural opportunities exist to present the results of this work at Yale through seminars, colloquia, and public lectures.

The center’s strategy comprises four pillars. First, we focus on issues that are truly core to globalization, like international trade, global finance, inclusion, and the provision of key global public goods. Second, relying on a diversity of means—from closed brainstorming sessions among highly specialized thinkers to large multidisciplinary conferences—the center serves at Yale as a catalyst for debate and cutting-edge thought with a view to generate policy-relevant proposals. Third, in addition to our priority task of interacting with the Yale community, we seek actively to collaborate with a variety of institutions and individuals across the globe to leverage our own resources, reinforce the policy pertinence of our work, and support Yale’s internationalization efforts. And fourth, in the endeavor of disseminating critical analysis and stirring constructive debate, we apply ourselves to reach not only the academic and policy worlds with printed publications, but also to communicate with a wide audience of informed citizens around the world.

Included among the center’s recent international activities are the following:

YCSG works with the Natural Resource Charter, an effort to establish a set of principles for governments and societies on how best to harness the opportunities created by extractive resources for development.

The center also works with the Global Commission on Elections, Democracy and Security, for which the center’s director serves as vice chair and Kofi Annan as chair. It aims to highlight the importance of the integrity of elections to achieving a more secure, prosperous, and stable world. The Global Commission works to convince different stakeholders why elections with integrity matter not just for democracy, but also for security, human rights, and development. At the heart of the Global Commission’s approach is ensuring that the international community applies political solutions to the political problems surrounding elections, rather than purely technical approaches.

In follow-up to the center’s collaboration with the Global Commission on Drug Policy, YCSG held a conference in 2011 that resulted in the publication Rethinking the “War on Drugs” through the US-Mexico Prism, which is available for download at www.ycsg.yale.edu.

On campus, the center hosts international conferences, organizes workshops and panels, and works constantly to bring to the Yale community individuals who have input on international policy. YCSG’s Distinguished Visiting Fellows interact with faculty and students and are expected to produce one or more publications during their tenure.

In order to multiply the effects of the internal and external dimensions of the center’s strategy, YCSG has developed a global media instrument, YaleGlobal Online magazine (www.yaleglobal.yale.edu). YaleGlobal explores the growing interconnectedness of the world and aims to analyze and promote debate on all aspects of globalization. A Chinese-language edition, YaleGlobal Fudan Edition, was launched in September of 2009 with partner institution Fudan University. The magazine posts three original articles per week, republishes and archives articles from around the globe, and offers interviews with eminent visitors as well as video recordings of the center’s events at Yale. With a vastly increased readership in over 160 countries, YaleGlobal now receives 1.5 to 2 million hits per week.

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Yale Climate and Energy Institute

http://climate.yale.edu

Director Mark Pagani

The Yale Climate and Energy Institute (YCEI) seeks to understand Earth’s climate system, the ecological and social impacts of climate change, and the strengths and weaknesses of current political and economic systems’ ability to respond to climate change, and to provide realistic, implementable solutions to societies and communities around the world.

The YCEI promotes interdisciplinary research and research initiatives that integrate faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students to address pressing issues in climate and energy. Core programs include postdoctoral fellowships, seed research grants for faculty, grants for workshops and symposia, and an undergraduate program in energy studies.

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Yale Initiative for the Study of Antiquity and the Premodern

Graduate Coordinator

Christina Kraus (Classics; Renaissance Studies)

Associate Coordinator

Hindy Najman (Judaic Studies; Religious Studies)

Steering Committee (2013–16) Harold Attridge (Divinity), John J. Collins (Divinity), Eckart Frahm (Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations), Edward Kamens (East Asian Languages & Literatures), Christina Kraus (Classics; Renaissance Studies), J.G. Manning (Classics; History), Susan Matheson (Art Gallery), Hindy Najman (Judaic Studies; Religious Studies)

The Yale Initiative for the Study of Antiquity and the Premodern world (YISAP) aims to bring together faculty and students sharing an interest in antiquity and the premodern. It supplements the curriculum with seminars, conferences, and special lectures by scholars from Yale as well as visiting scholars, and offers a graduate qualification. Students with an interest in YISAP should apply to one of the University’s degree-granting departments, and should meet the entrance standards of the admitting department. Departments currently participating in YISAP are Classics, East Asian Languages and Literatures, History of Art, and Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations; students from other relevant units should contact the YISAP graduate coordinators.

The qualification program provides enhanced training to graduate students with wide-ranging interests in the ancient and premodern world to extend their studies beyond departmental lines. Program students are expected to fulfill the requirements of the home department, but their course of study is individually modified to allow for interdisciplinary work through classes, examinations, and guidance by faculty in several departments.

Graduate students who are enrolled in and funded by participating departments will earn a qualification upon satisfactory completion of the requirements. Students should apply to the department that coincides best with their backgrounds and their prospective areas of specialization, and they should indicate an interest in the interdepartmental program at the time of their application to that department. Students in participating Ph.D. programs earn the qualification en route to the doctorate. The qualification in YISAP is open to Yale Ph.D. students and to students at the Divinity School.

A program of study for completion of the qualification must include the Core Seminar introducing students to issues in the study of the premodern world. In addition, a minimum of three other courses plus a capstone project is required, the courses to be selected in consultation from the current year’s offerings of advanced language study and seminars related to the premodern world at the graduate level. The course of study must be approved by YISAP’s graduate coordinator and by the director of graduate studies (DGS) of the student’s home department, who together with the student will lay out a blueprint for completing the requirements, articulating a field of concentration and a direction for the capstone project, and identifying potential mentors.

Requirements for the Qualification

  • 1. A team-taught Core Seminar introducing students to issues in the study of antiquity and the premodern world, from a cross- and multidisciplinary perspective. Initiative students normally take the Core Seminar in the first year of study. Offered each year in the spring, the seminar is normally a team-taught class sponsored by two or more of the cooperating departments. There will be supplementary sessions in the Yale collections (e.g., the Yale Art Gallery or the Beinecke) and a required monthly colloquium component. Specific topics vary, but each seminar has significant interdisciplinary and comparative dimensions emphasizing the methodologies and techniques of the fields involved.
  • 2. A minimum of three pre-approved courses, of which at least two must be seminar or seminar-type courses, chosen in consultation with YISAP’s graduate coordinator and the DGS of the student’s home department from courses offered across the University. These will in most cases be courses that also fill requirements for the student’s home department, and must be at a level that would normally be accepted for graduate study in that department.
  • 3. A capstone project that demonstrates the student’s capacity to pursue independent, interdisciplinary research (the equivalent of 1 or 2 course units, depending on the scope), to be approved in consultation with YISAP’s graduate coordinator and the DGS of the student’s home department (e.g., an exhibition, documentary, research paper, conservation project).
  • 4. Regular participation in events hosted by YISAP throughout the academic year, especially the monthly meetings of the Ancient Societies Workshop.

Students who fulfill these requirements will receive a letter from the DGS of the Classics department, indicating that they have completed the work for the qualification.

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