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Life at the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies

Educational Facilities

Kroon Hall, the ultra-green home of F&ES, expresses in physical form the School’s best traditions, values, and aspirations. The building, which opened in January 2009, achieves its remarkable energy savings from a host of design elements and technical strategies molded to fit the weather and climate of its New England location. Situated in the area of the University known as Science Hill, Kroon Hall is named for the family of benefactor and Yale College alumnus Richard Kroon, B.A. 1964. With its high barrel-vaulted gable ends, simple lines, and curved rooftop, Kroon Hall is a modernist blend of cathedral nave and Connecticut barn.

Kroon Hall provides office space for fifty faculty and staff members and has three classrooms. The 175-seat Burke Auditorium is used for lectures and classes, and commands beautiful views of West Rock and the David S. Ingalls Rink across the street. The Knobloch Environment Center is meant for socializing, but students have also embraced it as a study space. The Ordway Learning Center on the ground floor also has ample space for quiet study. The $33.5 million building was designed by Hopkins Architects of Great Britain in partnership with Connecticut-based Centerbrook Architects and Planners and holds the highest rating—platinum—in the green-building certification program, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED). Kroon Hall provides 56,467 square feet and is designed to use 67 percent less energy than a typical building of its size. Its tall, thin shape and east-west orientation play a big role in heating and cooling. The lowest floor is set into a hillside, with only its south side exposed, providing thermal insulation, minimizing northern exposure, and increasing the amount of natural light that enters the building from adjacent courtyards. The long south facade maximizes solar gain during the winter, and Douglas fir louvers covering glass facades on the east and west ends keep out unwanted heat and glare. The building’s shape, combined with the glass facades, enables daylight to provide much of the interior’s illumination. Light and occupancy sensors dim artificial lighting when it is not needed.

A 100-kilowatt rooftop array of photovoltaic panels provides 25 percent of the building’s electricity. Four 1,500-foot-deep wells use the relatively constant 55-degree (F) temperature of underground water for heating and cooling, replacing the need for conventional boilers and air conditioning. Four solar panels embedded in the southern facade provide hot water. Exposed concrete walls and ceilings provide thermal stability by retaining heat in winter and cold in summer. Instead of air being forced through overhead ducts, an energy-saving displacement ventilation system moves warm and cool air through an air plenum and multiple diffusers in elevated floors. Low-velocity fans in the basement keep the air circulating throughout the building. In winter, the ventilation system also transfers the heat from exhaust to incoming fresh air, and in summer, air handling units spray water on incoming fresh air, reducing its temperature by up to 18° through evaporation.

In mild weather, Kroon’s occupants assist in the energy savings by opening windows in response to an electronic, color-coded prompt system. A pair of green and amber lights in each hallway indicate whether it’s a “Green Day”: i.e., when the green indicator light is on, the ventilation and cooling/heating systems shut down, and the windows should be opened for natural ventilation.

A rainwater-harvesting system channels water from the roof and grounds to a garden in the south courtyard, where aquatic plants filter out sediment and contaminants. The gray water, held in underground storage tanks, is used for irrigation and pumped back into Kroon for flushing toilets. The system is designed to save 300,000 gallons of potable city water annually and to reduce the burden on city sewers by lessening the amount of storm runoff. Half of Kroon Hall’s red oak paneling—15,000 board feet—came from the 7,840-acre Yale Myers Forest in northern Connecticut, which is managed by the School. The building’s pale yellow exterior, composed of sandstone from Ohio, echoes other Yale buildings. The north and south courtyards were constructed to create a community among disparate buildings on Science Hill. The south courtyard, landscaped by Olin Studio of Philadelphia, is a raised platform, with a green roof of soil one-foot deep and surrounded by twenty-five varieties of native plantings. Underneath the courtyard is a service node, centralizing all trash and recycling pickups as well as deliveries for the southwest corner of Science Hill and accessible by a single driveway off Sachem Street.

Sage Hall, a four-story building located at 205 Prospect Street and a gift of William H. Sage, B.A. 1865, in memory of his son, DeWitt Linn Sage, B.A. 1897, was completed in 1923. Administrative, doctoral program, development, alumni, and program offices of the School are housed in Sage Hall, along with three classrooms. Sage Hall is home to a computer center with twenty-six computers for student use. Sage also houses a 490-square-foot student lounge, appointed with a large table and comfortable couches, which students use for studying, special events, and weekly social events. Bowers Auditorium is designed to handle large lectures and seminars as well as small group projects. Bowers, which has a seating capacity of more than 110 with tables and chairs, was built onto Sage Hall in 1931 with funds provided by the bequest of Edward A. Bowers, B.A. 1879. In 2011 the original Bowers floor was replaced using beautiful red oak flooring harvested from Yale Myers Forest.

Facilities for research and instruction in silviculture, natural resource and forest economics, forest policy, and biometry are in Marsh Hall at 360 Prospect Street in the Marsh Botanical Garden. A classroom and meeting space are available on the first floor. This large, four-story mansion was originally the residence of Professor Othniel C. Marsh, B.A. 1860, a distinguished paleontologist and Western explorer of the nineteenth century. He bequeathed the building to the University in 1899, and for twenty-five years it housed the entire Forest School. Marsh Hall was designated a National Historic Landmark by the United States Department of the Interior in 1965.

The William B. Greeley Memorial Laboratory at 370 Prospect Street, named in honor of William Buckhout Greeley, M.F. 1904, houses a recently renovated social space in the main lobby and laboratories for research into the ecology and management of landscapes and ecosystems, urban sustainability, the biology of trees, and environmental chemistry. The recently renovated wood shop is available for students—after receiving tool and safety training—to work on projects that require the use of a drill, saw, sander, drill press, or soil hammermill. The building was designed by renowned architect Paul Rudolph and is a classic example of “Brutalist” architecture. Adjacent to the Greeley lab is a 3,800-square-foot greenhouse, which is used for hands-on learning and research. Greeley Laboratory and its greenhouse were built in 1959 with funds from the forest industries, the John A. Hartford Foundation, and other benefactors.

The Class of 1954 Environmental Science Center at 21 Sachem Street is dedicated to the Class of 1954 in honor of the $70 million the class donated in 2000 to support new science buildings and other major University priorities. It is an interdisciplinary facility built by the University with the aim of further fostering leadership in teaching and research of science and engineering. The building was designed to encourage collaboration among faculty and students pursuing environmental studies. The dean and four natural science faculty members from F&ES have their laboratories in the Environmental Science Center, which also houses research laboratories for the Yale Science Departments of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Geology and Geophysics, and Anthropology as well as the Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies.

The restored former residences at 301 Prospect Street and 380 Edwards Street house the offices of many of the School’s programs, as well as doctoral student offices; each building has a classroom.

Library Collection

The Henry S. Graves Memorial Library Collection for the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, one of the oldest and largest collections of forestry publications in the United States, is located in the Center for Science and Social Science Information (CSSSI) in Kline Biology Tower (http://csssi.yale.edu). The collection is named in honor of the School’s first dean, Henry S. Graves, who purchased the initial collection of German forestry books and continued to support a strong library serving the School’s graduate forestry program.

Current holdings in the Graves Collection consist of more than 100,000 books, documents, technical reports, and serial publications dealing with forestry, forest science, natural resource management, and environmental sciences and management. The collection receives many print journal, periodical, and other serial titles, in addition to providing access to electronic titles. Older materials in the Graves Collection are housed in the Library Shelving Facility. All materials are accessible through the Yale Library electronic catalog, ORBIS.

The Graves Collection is committed to acquiring whatever books and journals are needed to support the School’s teaching and research activities. In addition, students have access to the enormous holdings of the Yale University Library, described below.

Reference and information services are provided locally, with the F&ES librarian having office hours in both Sage and Kroon Halls while maintaining a permanent office in the nearby CSSSI. Access to electronic databases covering the wide range of subjects of interest within the School (e.g., ProQuest Environmental Science Collection, CAB Abstracts, BIOSIS, and Web of Science) is provided through the library’s Web site at www.library.yale.edu. These research tools and others, on such subjects as international affairs, water, soils, fish, wildlife, policy affairs, and law, are accessible throughout the campus. As a part of Yale University Library system, the Graves Collection participates in all library services offered to Yale patrons: paper-based, electronic, local, and through interlibrary loan services.

Computer Resources

The mission of the F&ES Information Technology Department (FES-IT) is to support all aspects of computing for every member of the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies community. We use and support multiple platforms, including Windows and Macintosh operating systems. Students are strongly encouraged, but not required, to bring their own computers. Admitted students may contact the FES-IT Helpdesk by e-mailing feshelpdesk@yale.edu for advice on the selection of appropriate hardware and software. We strongly encourage the purchase of Apple Macintosh or Lenovo Thinkpad laptop computers. A robust campus network provides wireless access within all F&ES buildings and throughout the Yale campus.

FES-IT, along with trained student technicians from Yale’s Student Technology Collaborative, provides drop-in technical support for students to assist with any academic or research computer needs they may have while on campus. After-hours student support is also available at Bass Library, within easy walking distance of the School. FES-IT provides secure centralized backup services for all F&ES faculty, staff, and students.

FES-IT maintains a drop-in student computing cluster in Sage Hall, Room 39, with twenty-six iMac computers that feature a mixture of 21.5-inch and 27-inch displays, 2.7 GHz Intel i5 quad-core processors, and 8 GB of RAM. The FES Cluster iMacs dual-boot into both MacOS 10.9 and Windows 7x64 for maximum flexibility.

The student computing cluster houses three high-capacity black-and-white printers and one high-capacity color printer. Additional wireless student printing is available in each F&ES building and throughout the Yale campus via the PaperCut Printing System. Printing in three dimensions is also available at the Yale Center for Engineering Innovation & Design (CEID) and the Yale School of Architecture.

FES-IT maintains an inventory of equipment that students may borrow for short periods of time through an online equipment checkout system (http://ulua.its.yale.edu/forestry). Equipment may be borrowed at no charge (late and replacement fees apply if equipment is returned late or lost or damaged). Included are laptop computers, GIS units, digital cameras, walkie-talkies, compact audio recorders, and other equipment.

The Yale University Library is also very active in the integration of information resources in digital format. Students and faculty have online access to a comprehensive variety of journals and databases, and the Sterling Memorial Library Map Collection employs a full-time GIS librarian who is available to assist students in obtaining and working with GIS datasets to support their work in any part of the globe.

The Center for Science and Social Science Information (http://csssi.yale.edu), a collaboration between Yale University Library and Yale’s central ITS department, offers an array of digital media technologies and operates several important digital resources, including the Statistical Classroom (“StatLab”) and a variety of software and databases, such as a Bloomberg Terminal. CSSSI also employs two full-time data librarians who are available for questions or consultation about finding, using, and managing research data in the sciences and social sciences. CSSSI is located in nearby Kline Biology Tower.

Faculty members have also developed many special computer applications for their projects, and some of these are available for student use in the Sage Hall student computing cluster.

Yale School Forests and the Quiet Corner Initiative

The Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies owns 10,900 acres of forestland in Connecticut, New Hampshire, and Vermont that are managed by the Yale School Forests Program. The program manages seven discrete forests that were donated to the School between 1913 and 1986 that range in size and geography from the 75-acre Crowell Ravine in Vermont to the 7,860-acre Yale Myers Forest in Connecticut. The composition of the Yale Forests reflects a latitudinal gradient ranging from a central hardwood cover type in Connecticut to a northern hardwood cover type in New Hampshire and Vermont. Extensive stands of pine and hemlock exist in both regions. The area encompassed by the forests includes almost all of the topographical and soil conditions, site classifications, and cover types found in New England.

The management of the Yale School Forests comprises four goals: (1) provide opportunities for research; (2) provide educational and professional opportunities for the faculty and students; (3) create an asset to the School’s investment portfolio and to demonstrate financial sustainability; and (4) maintain and/or increase the forests’ ecological resiliency. Faculty and students use the Yale Forests as a laboratory for teaching, management, demonstration, and research. While a member of the faculty serves as director and a recent graduate serves as the manager as a School Forest Fellow, graduate students working as interns or coordinators carry out the bulk of the on-the-ground management and administration. The forests are maintained as working forests, and thus the tasks include selling timber and nontimber forest products from the land. The Yale Myers Forest is the largest and most heavily utilized parcel managed by the Yale School Forests Program and is certified by the Forest Stewardship Council.

Students working on the Yale Forests receive training that covers aspects of hydrology and soils, taxonomy, forest and community ecology, silviculture, forest operations, forest policy, and sociology in order to prepare them for careers as foresters and land managers. Every summer ten to twelve students are chosen for the apprentice forester program at the Yale Forests, which includes hands-on training in maintenance of infrastructure, property boundary research and delineation, geographic information systems (GIS), mapping and classification, sampling and inventory, and the design and implementation of silvicultural prescriptions. Several students from the apprentice program are selected to work for the School Forests Program the following academic year, where they receive additional training in forest administration and management.

Research performed at the Yale Forests is conducted under the supervision of any faculty member of the School and encompasses forest ecology, silviculture, aquatic and wildlife community ecology, hydrology, and economic, legal, and social studies. The forest is used for both doctoral and master’s student research, the latter performed either as an independent project or in conjunction with student involvement with existing forest management.

The Yale Forests are used for both academic field trips and workshops held for professional or community organizations. Field trip and workshop topics include forest certification, wildlife habitat manipulation, ecosystem restoration, prescribed fire management, timber harvesting best management practices, silvicultural research, and pathways of forest stand development. Lastly, the Quiet Corner Initiative (QCI) has been developed as a method of engaging with the surrounding working landscape around Yale Myers Forest. QCI works by developing programs that connect master’s-level courses and University research to real environmental assessment and management challenges on private lands surrounding the forest. Programs currently in development focus on forest and open space conservation and management; renewable energy; and sustainable agriculture. In designing each QCI program, the initiative seeks to advance three separate but related sets of goals: (1) to enrich the applied curriculum for professional students at the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, providing reliable and consistent opportunities to bring learned skills to tangible problems that are in easy reach of the classroom; (2) to provide and cultivate a high-quality natural and social science research environment for students and faculty to investigate and analyze the drivers of environmental change and adaptive management at a landscape scale; and (3) to leverage the traditional strengths of Yale University in research, education, and leadership in working toward landscape-scale sustainability goals in our own backyard.

In addition to the forestland owned and managed by the School, close working relationships exist with other forests that are also used for education and research by faculty and students: the 6,800-acre Great Mountain Forest in northwestern Connecticut is available to the School through the courtesy of Edward C. Childs, B.A. ’28, M.F. ’32, and his family; and the 20,000-acre forestland owned and managed by the South Central Connecticut Regional Water Authority in New Haven County is one of the oldest managed forests in the western hemisphere. The University also owns approximately 370 acres of ecological preserves that are available to faculty and students.

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Communications

The goal for the School’s strategic communications is, in part, to contribute to public understanding and discourse on environmental issues and to encourage the integration of environmental issues into strategies for business, international development, government, and nongovernmental organizations.

The communications office publicizes faculty and student research and School-sponsored events through traditional and digital media.

School news, alumni profiles, and other items are regularly published through the School’s Web site (http://environment.yale.edu), e-mail newsletters, Facebook (www.facebook.com/YaleFES), Twitter (twitter.com/YaleFES), and LinkedIn.

To contact the F&ES communications office, e-mail communications.fes@yale.edu or call 203.436.4805.

Other communications vehicles include the award-winning online magazine Yale Environment 360; reports from the School’s centers and programs; and the student-edited publications Sage Magazine and Yale Environment Review.

Yale Environment 360 (http://e360.yale.edu) features reporting, analysis, and opinion on global environmental issues from leading writers, scientists, policy makers, and journalists in the field. Launched in 2008, Yale Environment 360 has established a broad global audience and received numerous awards and honors, including the 2010 National Magazine Award for Digital Media for Best Video. Selected Yale Environment 360 articles are now translated and republished in Spanish and Portuguese through a partnership with Universia (http://e360yale.universia.net).

For newsletters and reports of the individual centers and programs, refer to their individual Web sites, listed online at http://environment.yale.edu/centers.

Sage Magazine (www.sagemagazine.org) is a student-run environmental arts and journalism publication. Through creative and informative journalism, Sage seeks to expand popular notions of environmentalism and widen the debate around pressing and important environmental issues.

Yale Environment Review (http://environment.yale.edu/yer) is a student-run online publication that provides concise summaries of peer-reviewed research from around the world, with a focus on topics of general interest to those engaged in environmental and natural resource management.

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Student Organizations

The School has many student-run interest groups. Current student groups include the Africa SIG; Asia (ASIA) SIG; Built Environment and the Environment (BE2); the Climate Change SIG; the Coalition for Agriculture, Food, and Environment (CAFÉ); Commons Collective (CoCo); Conservation Investing; Energy SIG; Environmental and Social Entrepreneurship Club (ESEC); Environmental Justice at Yale (EJAY); Environmental Media & Arts; Ethnobotany and Economic Botany Student Interest Group (STIGMA); Fire Ecology & Management; the Forestry Club (FC); Fresh & Salty SIG; Geosciences and Technology (Geo SIG); Greening the Vote; Health and Environment at Yale (HEY); the Industrial Environmental Management and Energy Group (IEME); International Development and Environment (IDE); a student chapter of the International Society of Tropical Foresters (ISTF); the Latin American SIG (La SIG); Lucy-StUDS; the Multi-Ethnic Student Association (MESA); Outdoor Recreation SIG; Out in the Woods; Religion, Spirituality and Nature; Reptile and Amphibian Naturalist Alliance (RANA); Risk Reduction, Adaptation, and Disaster Student Interest Group (RRAD); SCOPE; the Yale chapter of the Society for Conservation Biology (CONBIO); a student chapter of the Society of American Foresters (SAF); Walk the Talk (WTT); WESTIES; Yale Environmental Law Association (YELA); Yale Environment Women (YEW); Yale Extractive Industries Working Group (YaleXWG); and the Student Advisory Committee (SAC). The activities of these groups include sponsoring guest and student lectures, organizing field trips, sponsoring workshops, organizing social events, holding conferences, and interacting with regional divisions of their respective societies.

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Funding for Master’s Student Projects and Activities

Master’s students often seek funding for scholarship, research, professional activities, and social events. Sometimes the request is for individual activity, sometimes on behalf of a group. Our School and Yale University have many funds to which students can apply. Among the most useful are the Master’s Student Travel fund to support attendance at a conference or symposium at which a student is giving a talk; MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies, which can help bring international visitors to Yale for a lecture or a conference; grants and contracts to faculty and centers for research; and the School’s Student Affairs Committee (SAC), which supports activities by our many student interest groups (SIGs).

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Alumni Association

The F&ES Alumni Association, led by a board of twenty to twenty-five alumni/ae who meet in person or by phone ten times a year to conduct the business of the association, hosts regional gatherings around the country and globally, and holds receptions at annual meetings of the Land Trust Alliance, the Ecological Society of America, and the Society of American Foresters. The board functions both as a committee of the whole and through several standing committees; officers of the board welcome inquiries from F&ES alums who want to be considered for seats on the board or any of its standing committees. Standing committees oversee nominations of officers and of recipients of the Distinguished Alumnus/a Award, host the annual reunion and regional gatherings, and assist staff with the Annual Fund and other fundraising initiatives. The School’s Web site, an emerging set of shared interest Web sites, and a quarterly newsletter, in addition to e-mail blasts, keep alumni/ae throughout the world in touch with each other and with the School.

The F&ES Alumni Association is also affiliated with the Association of Yale Alumni (AYA), which serves all alumni/ae of Yale University. The F&ES Office of Development and Alumni Services works directly with the AYA on several critical services for F&ES alumni/ae, including the Virtual Yale Station (e-mail forwarding), Online Alumni Directory (secure access contact database), and the Yale Career Network (professional profiles). Alumni/ae are encouraged to contact the Office of Development and Alumni Services at alumni.fes@yale.edu.

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Job Search Skills Development

Career Development Office

The mission of the Career Development Office (CDO) is to support students in their overall career and professional development and to build relationships with hiring organizations in order to provide students access to top opportunities fitting their career interests.

Our diverse resources, programs, and services enable users to develop key skills needed to present themselves professionally on the job market, develop and refine meaningful career goals, and chart a strategy for conducting effective job and internship searches.

We work with students on an ongoing basis through individual advising appointments as well as through workshops conducted by staff and other career development professionals.

Job Search Skills Programs
  • Introduction to Environmental Careers
  • Interpreting Your Career Leader Assessment Profile
  • Job Search Skills Intensives, Half-Day Programs:
  • • Jumpstarting the Job and Internship Search Part 1: Focus on strategies, résumé, cover letter, and networking
  • • Jumpstarting the Job and Internship Search Part 2: Focus on interview preparation, interview skills, and salary negotiations
  • LinkedIn: Create. Connect. Leverage.
  • LinkedIn Photo Booth
  • How to Work a Career Fair
  • Writing the Personal Statement
  • Applying for the Ph.D.
  • U.S. Business Etiquette for International Students
  • Writing the Cover Letter
  • Writing the Résumé
  • Salary Negotiations for Women
  • Salary Negotiations
  • Interview Skills 101
  • Interview Palooza: Mock Interviews with the Experts
  • Women in Leadership
  • Networking at Yale and Beyond

Internships and Summer Research

Internships and summer research have long been an important part of the educational program at Yale. They provide a unique opportunity to combine academic knowledge with practical experience, to enhance skills, and to gain professional confidence.

Students are assisted by the Career Development Office, faculty, alumni, and other students in their search for internships and summer research experiences. Attention is given to students to help them locate opportunities that meet their individual needs and interests.

Given the School’s strong ties with natural-resource, environmental, and conservation organizations worldwide, internship and research possibilities are virtually unlimited. Typical internships and research projects occur between the first and second years of the program; occasionally, however, they last for longer periods.

F&ES 006, Summer Internship/Research 0 credits. The summer internship or research project is an important opportunity for students to apply knowledge and skills gained during their first year of study, to gain professional experience and build networks, and to investigate potential career paths. Consists of a research project or internship experience between ten and twelve weeks, typically between the summer of the first and second years of the program. Students have latitude in designing a summer practicum closely aligned with individual academic and career goals. Students are responsible for securing their own internship or developing a relevant research project with appropriate faculty supervision, applying for and securing their own summer funding, and filing appropriate paperwork with the Career Development Office before and after the internship or research experience in order to receive course credit. Required for all master’s candidates.

Summer 2013 Internships and Research Projects

The following list shows the rich and diverse experiences that F&ES students had during a recent summer. Data for other years is available online at www.environment.yale.edu/careers.data.

Business and Industry
  • Access: Energy, Researcher, Kisumu, Kenya
  • Beveridge & Diamond, P.C., Summer Associate, D.C.
  • The Dannon Company, Environmental Sustainability Intern, N.Y.
  • Ecova, Research Intern, Colo.
  • EDF Climate Corps Fellow—Southwestern Energy Inc., Ariz.
  • EDF Climate Corps Fellow—Akamai Technologies, Calif.
  • EDF Climate Corps Fellow—Groomi Energy Solutions, Conn.
  • EDF Climate Corps Fellow—Tom’s of Maine, Maine
  • EDF Climate Corps Fellow—Belk, N.C.
  • EnerNOC Inc., Intern, Mass.
  • General Electric, Environmental Strategy Intern, Conn.
  • German Agency for International Cooperation, Intern, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
  • Google, Intern, Calif.
  • Hitachi Consulting, Practice Associate, Md.
  • HR&A Advisors, Analyst Fellow, N.Y.
  • J.P. Morgan, Summer Associate, N.Y.
  • Kearns & West, Intern, Calif.
  • Metabolic Lab, Urban Food Planning Consultant, Conn.
  • Quinciple, Intern (supply chain and sourcing standards), N.Y.
  • Recurrent Energy, Project Development Intern, Calif.
  • Resource Efficient Finance, Intern, Calif. and Conn.
  • Sharp Corporation, Business and Industry Research Assistant, Beijing, China
  • South Pole Carbon, Intern, Medellín, Colombia
  • Terrapin Bright Green, Intern, N.Y.
  • Textron Inc., Environmental Health and Safety Intern, R.I.
Education
  • Sierra Outdoor School, Naturalist Intern, Calif.
  • Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Apprentice Forester, Conn.
  • Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Apprentice Forester, Conn.
  • Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Apprentice Forester, Conn.
  • Yale University, Research Assistant, Conn.
  • Yale University, Institutional Food Hub Coordinator, Conn.
Government and Public Sector
  • Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority, Intern, Conn.
  • EDF Climate Corps—Bay Area Climate Collaborative, Climate Corps Fellow, Calif.
  • EDF Climate Corps—City of Boston, Climate Corps Fellow, Mass.
  • EDF Climate Corps—Housing Authority of the City of Milwaukee, Climate Corps Fellow, Wis.
  • Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Intern, Rome, Italy
  • South Asia Association for Regional Cooperation Research Centre, Research Intern, Thimphu, Bhutan
  • U.S. Forest Service, Intern, P.R.
  • U.S. Forest Service, Pathways Program Intern, Colo.
  • Virginia Outdoors Foundation, Intern, Va.
  • The World Bank, Intern, D.C.
NGOs and Other Nonprofits
  • Agricultural Stewardship Association, Outreach Intern, N.Y.
  • Audubon Florida, Everglades Policy Intern, Fla.
  • Bridger Ski Foundation, Intern, Mont.
  • Coalition of Oregon Land Trusts, Policy Associate, Ore.
  • CPI-ISB, Intern, Hyderabad, India
  • EDF Climate Corps—Boston Medical Center, Fellow, Mass.
  • EDF Climate Corps—Children’s Defense Fund, Fellow, D.C.
  • Environmental Defense Fund, Amazon Basin Project Intern, D.C.
  • Environmental Defense Fund, Water Efficiency Intern, D.C.
  • Foundation for the Philippine Environment, Researcher, Quezon City, Philippines
  • International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), Intern/IUCN Adviser, N.Y.
  • International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), Legal Intern, Bonn, Germany
  • Maui Economic Development Board, Intern, Hawaii
  • Natural Resources Defense Council, Intern, N.Y.
  • Natural Resources Defense Council, Cameron Speth Fellow, D.C.
  • Natural Resources Defense Council, Moran Fellow, Calif.
  • The Nature Conservancy, Coastal Climate Adaptation and Policy Intern, Conn.
  • The Nature Conservancy, Forest Ecologist, Pa.
  • The Nature Conservancy, Summer Associate, Calif.
  • Nature Iraq, Intern/American Society of International Law Helton Fellow, Sulaymaniyah, Iraq
  • Prince’s Foundation for Building Community, Intern, London, U.K.
  • Sierra Club, Intern, Wash.
  • Sociedad Peruana de Derecho Ambiental, Intern, Chachapoyas, Peru
  • The Ucross Foundation, Project Organizer, Wyo.
  • U.S. Green Building Council, Intern, D.C.
  • UNDP (United Nations Development Programme), Intern, Bangkok, Thailand
  • Urban Resources Initiative, Community Forester Intern, Conn.
  • Urban Resources Initiative, Community Forester Intern, Conn.
  • Urban Resources Initiative, Greenspace Community Forester Intern, Conn.
  • WCS Rwanda, Intern, Nyungwe, Rwanda
  • Wildlife Conservation Society, Researcher, N.Y.
  • World Resources Institute, Intern, D.C.
  • World Resources Institute, Intern, Oreg.
Non-U.S. Independent Research
  • Analysis on agendas of 15th Tripartite Environment Ministers Meeting upon Chinese air pollution, Sejong, South Korea
  • Analyzing the atmospheric composition of 10 megacities worldwide and quantifying how pollution emissions from these mega urban areas cool or warm the Earth’s surface and atmosphere, Conn.
  • The annual survey of northern leopard frogs around Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  • Are incentive-based mechanisms effective in promoting enhanced forest conservation in the Brazilian Amazon? Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • Climate change adaptation and water access resiliency in rural Haiti, Deschapelles, Haiti
  • Climate-induced adaptation and relocation: a case study of Mphunga, Malawi
  • Comparative study of the effect of biostimulant shoots on plant growth and effect of sorbitol in reducing suboptimal drought stress on soybeans grown under rain-fed farm, Ghana
  • Conducting in-person surveys using the travel cost and choice experiment economic valuation methods with residents and tourists to determine demands and values for marine wildlife in the UNESCO World Heritage Site, Puerto Madryn, Argentina
  • Counting cats: testing camera trap methodologies to assess lion populations in northern Tanzania, Arusha, Tanzania
  • Developing allometric models for estimation of biomass and carbon stocks of tropical rain forest in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Kisangani and Mambasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
  • Development of sustainable and specialty coffee in Colombia, Medellín, Colombia
  • Ecosystem services for disaster risk reduction: modeling the effects of land use change on freshwater flood mitigation in San Salvador, El Salvador
  • Elephants, small-holder farmers, and the beehive fence: participatory human-elephant conflict mitigation in Kenya, Voi, Kenya
  • Evaluation of Zero Hunger: Brazil’s national policies targeting hunger and rural development, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • Examining participation and power between local actors in the Peruvian Andes, Cusco, Peru
  • Human dimension of climate change: climate vulnerability and food security in the Ethiopian highlands, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
  • Investigating methods for coupled energy-water-materials footprints of cities, Kanpur, India
  • Land use change, forest fragmentation, and riparian ecosystem health in the dry tropics of Panama, Los Asientos de Pedasí, Panama
  • Natural disasters: a governance study of climate-resilient urban planning in Manila, Philippines
  • Nigerian children and nature, Calabar, Nigeria
  • Reforestation research in Colombia, Bogotá, Colombia
  • Remote sensing to identify urban exposure to coastal hazards, Taipei, Taiwan
  • Research on coastal cities adaptation to climate change and in particular rising sea levels, Delft, Netherlands
  • Revolution from the kitchen: women’s empowerment and clean cookstoves in the Indian Western Himalaya, Kullu District, India
  • The role and influence of oil and gas companies on Canadian climate policy, Edmonton, Canada
  • The turbulent interface: livelihoods and interactions between labor migration and hydropower development in Nepal, Kathmandu, Nepal
  • Unveiling the social context of international ivory trade: Chinese, African, and Western perspectives, Kenya and China
U.S. Independent Research
  • Anthropology research on the risk perceptions to climate change in southeast Alaska, Alaska
  • Cities and climate change (IPCC WGIII Chapter 12), Conn.
  • Community dynamics, perceptions, and organizing around the Pebble Mine Project in Dillingham, Alaska
  • A comparison of salt marsh migration rates onto lawn and forested landscapes, Conn.
  • Designing institutional architectures to facilitate policy learning, Conn.
  • Differentiating drivers of marsh loss in Long Island Sound, Conn.
  • The effect of local adaptation in a herbivore on the ecosystem response to warming, Conn.
  • Estimation of forest biomass dynamics using LiDAR Remote Sensing, Conn.
  • The holistic impacts of climate change on mountain towns and opportunities for action, Calif.
  • How do aboveground and belowground consumers impact nitrogen mineralization?, Conn.
  • How do eastern subterranean termites (reticulitermes flavipes) affect the functioning of temperate forest soils?, Conn.
  • Impacts of urban form on transportation, Conn.
  • Investigating motivating factors for support of or opposition to conservation in eastern Colorado, Colo.
  • Leveraging peer effects: the effect of community-based programs on the adoption of solar panels, Conn.
  • Management and policy for wildlife resources in large-scale landscapes, Wyo.
  • Oversee the development of the CITIESENSE Web site resource; explore streamlining opportunities for land bank property acquisition process, Conn.
  • Problems in cultural-ecological health and intersecting tribal and county policies: the redwood forest of northwestern California, Calif.
  • Regional appropriate distributed renewable technologies, Conn.
  • Research on the superalloy recycling industry, Conn.
  • A roadmap for cities to develop green infrastructure plans, D.C.
  • The role of restored wetlands in climate mitigation, CA
  • Soil carbon sequestration in a hazelnut and chestnut agroforestry system, Minn. and Urban food system asset map for Lowell, Mass.
  • Spatial linkages between the growth of urban centers and major global cropping areas: historical relationships and contemporary conditions, Conn.
  • Study on tech industry’s use of data centers, Ga.
  • Study on the factors that control nitrogen removal efficiency in constructed wetlands, Conn.
  • The tick-borne disease ecology of Lyme disease and babesiosis, R.I.
  • The transformational potential of food systems organizing, Conn.
  • Urbanization and distributional decay in an amphibian, Conn.

The above list was compiled by the Career Development Office, Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. For more information, please contact Kathy Douglas, Associate Director, at 203.436.4830 or kathryn.douglas@yale.edu.

The School and its students thank donors, host organizations, and supervisors for making these valuable professional experiences possible.

Immediately Following Graduation

Each year Yale F&ES graduates enjoy employment success in environmental science, policy, and management within the United States and around the world, or they pursue admission for further academic study. Details including salary information can be found on the most recent as well as previous classes at http://environment.yale.edu/careers/data.

Summary data from the class of 2013 master’s graduates six months after graduation (139 responses):

  • Nonprofit
  • 27%
  • Government
  • 17%
  • Business/Consulting
  • 16%
  • Further Study
  • 21%
  • Business/Law
  • 14%
  • Academic
  • 11%
  • Entrepreneurship
  • 1%

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Leave of Absence

Students are expected to follow a continuous course of study at the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. However, a student who wishes or needs to interrupt his or her study temporarily may request a leave of absence. There are three types of leave—personal, medical, and parental—all of which are described below. The general policies that apply to a leave of absence are:

  • 1. Any student who is contemplating a leave of absence should see the assistant dean for student services to discuss the necessary application procedures.
  • 2. All leaves of absence must be approved by the assistant dean for student services and the associate dean for academic affairs. Medical leaves also require the written recommendation of a physician on the staff of Yale Health, as described below.
  • 3. A student may be granted a leave of absence of one to two years. Any leave approved by the assistant dean for student services and the associate dean for academic affairs will be for a specified period.
  • 4. International students who apply for a leave of absence must consult with OISS regarding their visa status.
  • 5. A student on a leave of absence may complete outstanding work in courses for which he or she has been granted extensions. He or she may not, however, fulfill any other degree requirements during the time on leave.
  • 6. A student on a leave of absence is not eligible for financial aid, including loans; and in most cases, student loans are not deferred during periods of nonenrollment.
  • 7. A student on a leave of absence is not eligible for the use of any University facilities normally available to enrolled students.
  • 8. A student on leave of absence may continue to be enrolled in Yale Health by purchasing coverage through the Student Affiliate Coverage plan. In order to secure continuous coverage from Yale Health, enrollment in this plan must be requested prior to the beginning of the term in which the student will be on leave. If a leave of absence is granted during the term, the student must request Yale Health Affiliate Coverage enrollment within thirty days of the date when the leave is approved. Coverage is not automatic; enrollment forms are available from the Member Services Department of Yale Health, 203.432.0246, or can be downloaded from the Yale Health Web site (http://yalehealth.yale.edu).
  • 9. A student on a leave of absence does not have to file a formal application for readmission. However, he or she must notify the assistant dean for student services in writing of his or her intention to return at least eight weeks prior to the end of the approved leave. In addition, if the returning student wishes to be considered for financial aid, he or she must submit appropriate financial aid applications to the School’s financial aid office to determine eligibility.
  • 10. A student on a leave of absence who does not return at the end of an approved leave, and does not request and receive an extension from the dean, is automatically dismissed from the School.

Personal leave of absence A student who wishes or needs to interrupt study temporarily because of personal exigencies may request a personal leave of absence. The general policies governing all leaves of absence are described above. A student who is current with his or her degree requirements is eligible for a personal leave after satisfactory completion of at least one term of study. Personal leaves cannot be granted retroactively and normally will not be approved after the tenth day of a term.

To request a personal leave of absence, the student must apply in writing before the beginning of the term for which the leave is requested, explaining the reasons for the proposed leave and stating both the proposed start and end dates of the leave, and the address at which the student can be reached during the period of the leave. If the assistant dean for student services and the associate dean for academic affairs find the student to be eligible, the leave will be approved. In any case, the student will be informed in writing of the action taken. A student who does not apply for a personal leave of absence, or whose application for a leave is denied, and who does not register for any term, will be considered to have withdrawn from the School.

Medical leave of absence A student who must interrupt study temporarily because of illness or injury may be granted a medical leave of absence with the approval of the director of student services and the associate dean for academic affairs, on the written recommendation of a physician on the staff of Yale Health. The general policies governing all leaves of absence are described above. A student who is making satisfactory progress toward his or her degree requirements is eligible for a medical leave any time after matriculation. The final decision concerning a request for a medical leave of absence will be communicated in writing by the assistant dean for student services.

The School of Forestry & Environmental Studies reserves the right to place a student on a medical leave of absence when, on the recommendation of the director of Yale Health or the chief of the Department of Mental Health and Counseling, the dean of the School determines that the student is a danger to self or others because of a serious medical problem.

A student who is placed on medical leave during any term will have his or her tuition adjusted according to the same schedule used for withdrawals (see Tuition Rebate and Refund Policy). Before re-registering, a student on medical leave must secure written permission to return from a Yale Health physician.

Leave of absence for parental responsibilities A student who wishes or needs to interrupt his or her study temporarily for reasons of pregnancy, maternity care, or paternity care may be granted a leave of absence for parental responsibilities. The general policies governing all leaves of absence are described above. A student who is making satisfactory progress toward his or her degree requirements is eligible for parental leave any time after matriculation.

Any student planning to have or care for a child is encouraged to meet with the assistant dean for student services to discuss leaves and other short-term arrangements. For many students, short-term arrangements rather than a leave of absence are possible. Students living in University housing units are encouraged to review their housing contract and the related polices of the Graduate Housing Office before applying for a parental leave of absence. Students granted a parental leave may continue to reside in University housing to the end of the academic term for which the leave was first granted, but no longer.

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U.S. Military Leave Readmissions Policy

Students who wish or need to interrupt their studies to perform U.S. military service are subject to a separate U.S. military leave readmissions policy. In the event a student withdraws or takes a leave of absence from the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies to serve in the U.S. military, the student will be entitled to guaranteed readmission under the following conditions:

  • 1. The student must have served in the U.S. Armed Forces for a period of more than thirty consecutive days;
  • 2. The student must give advance written or oral notice of such service to the assistant dean for student services and the associate dean for academic affairs. In providing the advance notice the student does not need to indicate whether he or she intends to return. This advance notice need not come directly from the student, but rather, can be made by an appropriate officer of the U.S. Armed Forces or official of the U.S. Department of Defense. Notice is not required if precluded by military necessity. In all cases, this notice requirement can be fulfilled at the time the student seeks readmission, by submitting an attestation that the student performed the service.
  • 3. The student must not be away from the School to perform U.S. military service for a period exceeding five years (this includes all previous absences to perform U.S. military service but does not include any initial period of obligated service). If a student’s time away from the School to perform U.S. military service exceeds five years because the student is unable to obtain release orders through no fault of the student or the student was ordered to or retained on active duty, the student should contact the assistant dean for student services to determine if the student remains eligible for guaranteed readmission.
  • 4. The student must notify the School within three years of the end of his or her U.S. military service of his or her intention to return. However, a student who is hospitalized or recovering from an illness or injury incurred in or aggravated during the U.S. military service has up until two years after recovering from the illness or injury to notify the School of his or her intent to return.
  • 5. The student cannot have received a dishonorable or bad conduct discharge or have been sentenced in a court-martial.

A student who meets all of these conditions will be readmitted for the next term, unless the student requests a later date of readmission. Any student who fails to meet one of these requirements may still be readmitted under the general readmission policy but is not guaranteed readmission.

Upon returning to the School, the student will resume his or her education without repeating completed course work for courses interrupted by U.S. military service. The student will have the same enrolled status last held and with the same academic standing. For the first academic year in which the student returns, the student will be charged the tuition and fees that would have been assessed for the academic year in which the student left the institution. Yale may charge up to the amount of tuition and fees other students are assessed, however, if veteran’s education benefits will cover the difference between the amounts currently charged other students and the amount charged for the academic year in which the student left.

In the case of a student who is not prepared to resume his or her studies with the same academic status at the same point where the student left off or who will not be able to complete the program of study, the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies will undertake reasonable efforts to help the student become prepared. If after reasonable efforts, the School determines that the student remains unprepared or will be unable to complete the program, or after the School determines that there are no reasonable efforts it can take, the School may deny the student readmission.

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