Yale University.Calendar.Directories.

Faculty Profiles

Keira Alexandra Graphic designer. Ms. Alexandra graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1990 with a B.F.A. in graphic design. She then worked for some of New York’s most notable design firms including M&Co., Bureau, and Number 17. In 1999 she moved into the field of broadcast, first as an on-air designer/director at MTV, followed by a post as creative director of Sundance Channel. She currently mans her own mobile creative services shop, Employee Number 1. Ms. Alexandra’s work has been included in the 100 Show, the Art Directors Club, Creativity 30, AIGA 365, and the BDA Design Awards and featured in ID, Metropolis, Eye, Bust, Print, and Dwell magazines. Ms. Alexandra has worked as a lecturer and part-time critic at Yale on and off since 2000.

Jonathan Andrews Filmmaker. Mr. Andrews received his B.A. in film studies from Yale University in 1996. His first film, The Night Tram, was produced during a semester abroad at FAMU, the national film academy of the Czech Republic, and was nominated for a Student Academy Award in 1995. His senior project film, Short Change, won the Louis Sudler Prize in the Performing and Creative Arts and received a Student Academy Award in 1996. In 2001 Mr. Andrews wrote, produced, and directed Pursuing Happiness, a feature-length digital motion picture set in small-town Vermont. Mr. Andrews was appointed lecturer in 2003.

Mark Aronson Conservator. Mr. Aronson received a B.A. in art from Reed College, an M.S. in the conservation and preservation of artistic and historic artifacts from the University of Delaware, Winterthur Museum program, and a certificate of study in painting conservation from the Center for Conservation and Technical Studies at the Fogg Museum, Harvard University. He was a Getty Fellow at the Frans Hals Museum, Haarlem, The Netherlands; both an IMLS and Mellon Fellow at the Philadelphia Museum of Art; and a National Museum Act Fellow in Painting Conservation at the Cincinnati Art Museum. He served as the chief conservator at the Yale University Art Gallery for fourteen years, has lectured in Yale’s History of Art department, and has been a guest conservator at the J. Paul Getty Museum. Mr. Aronson is particularly interested in the history of painting techniques and attitudes toward restoration and conservation. Since July 2007 he has been the chief conservator at the Yale Center for British Art; he was appointed critic in painting/printmaking in 2008.

Doug Ashford Painter. Mr. Ashford is associate professor at Cooper Union in New York, where he has taught design, sculpture, and theory since 1989. He received a B.F.A. there in 1981. His principle art practice from 1982 to 1996 was as a member of the artists’ collaborative Group Material. Since then he has gone on to make paintings, write, and produce independent public projects. His most recent publication is Who Cares (2006), a book project built from a series of conversations among cultural practitioners on public expression, beauty, and ethics. His paintings were recently included in the Sharjah Biennial 10 (2011) and Abstract Possible at the Malmö Konsthall, Museo Tamayo, and other locations (2010–11). Mr. Ashford was appointed visiting associate professor of painting/printmaking in 2011.

Michel Auder Artist. Born in Soissons, France, Mr. Auder was made to join the military at a young age as a photographer during the Algerian war. Returning to Paris, he started to make films and later joined a group of filmmakers during the protests of May 1968. Arriving in New York City the following year, he was the first to employ the video camera as his primary art-making device. Since then, his work has spanned a variety of styles and genres, all shot on video. He has exhibited widely in North America and Europe at such venues as Migros Museum, Zurich; Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago; Williams College Museum of Art; Anthology Film Archives; the Whitney Museum of American Art; Rooseum Center for Contemporary Art, Malmö; Kunsthalle Wien; the Centre for Contemporary Images, Geneva; and the Berlin, London, and Copenhagen film festivals. Mr. Auder taught in the sculpture department in 2006 and was appointed critic in 2009.

Nicole Awai Painter. Ms. Awai was born in Trinidad and educated in the United States. She received her B.A. in 1991 and an M.F.A. in multimedia art in 1996 from the University of South Florida. She also attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 1997. She has exhibited widely in the United States as well as internationally at such institutions as MoMA PS1, the Brooklyn Museum, the Salvador Dalí Museum, and the Queens Museum of Art. Ms. Awai’s work was included in the Biennial of Ceramic in Contemporary Art in Italy in 2003 and in the Busan Biennale in Korea in 2008. She has been an artist in residence at numerous places including the Studio Museum in Harlem, the John Michael Kohler Arts Center, and Hunter College. She was invited to speak about her work at the Whitney Museum of American Art as featured artist in the Initial Public Offerings series in 2005. Ms. Awai’s work was included in the traveling exhibition Global Caribbean: Focus on the Contemporary Caribbean Visual Art Landscape, and she was a featured speaker at the resulting “Global Caribbean Symposium: Interrogating the Politics of Location in Literature and Culture” (2010), a collaboration with the University of Miami. Ms. Awai was appointed critic in painting/printmaking in 2009.

Anna Betbeze Painter. Ms. Betbeze received a B.F.A. from the University of Georgia in 2003 and an M.F.A. in painting/printmaking from Yale in 2006. She has held solo exhibitions at Kate Werble Gallery, New York; Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, North Adams; Lüttenmeijer, Berlin; and François Ghebaly Gallery, Los Angeles. Her work has been included in group exhibitions at the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris; MoMA PS1; Galerie Perrotin, Paris; Luxembourg & Dayan, New York; Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York; Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York; and Ramiken Crucible, New York. Ms. Betbeze was the recipient of a Metropolitan Museum of Art Rome Prize in 2013–14. She was appointed lecturer in painting/printmaking in 2009.

Michael Bierut Graphic designer. Michael Bierut studied graphic design at the University of Cincinnati’s College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning. Prior to joining the international design consultancy Pentagram as a partner in 1990, he was vice president of graphic design at Vignelli Associates. His work is represented in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Montreal. He has served as president of the American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA) and as a director of the Architectural League of New York, and is a member of the Art Directors Club Hall of Fame. He is a co-editor of the Looking Closer series of design criticism anthologies, a founding contributor to the online journal DesignObserver.com, and the author of Seventy-Nine Short Essays on Design (Princeton Architectural Press, 2007). In 2008 he received the Design Mind award from the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum. He was appointed lecturer in graphic design in 1993 and is currently senior critic.

Julian Bittiner Graphic designer. Mr. Bittiner is an independent designer originally from Geneva, Switzerland. He received B.F.A.s in fine art and in graphic design from Art Center College of Design in 1995 and 1999, and an M.F.A. in graphic design from Yale in 2008. He worked variously as a designer and art director at MetaDesign, Wolff Olins, and Apple Inc., establishing an independent practice in 2004 focused primarily on the cultural sector. His work has appeared in books including Language, Culture, Type: International Type Design in the Age of Unicode; Regular: Graphic Design Today; and Grown in California; and the magazines ID and Creative Review; and his writing has been published in the journal Visual Communication. In 2008 he organized the first Yale M.F.A. Graphic Design traveling exhibition, Dawdle & Gape. He was appointed lecturer in graphic design in 2008.

Jennifer Blessing Curator. Ms. Blessing received a B.A. from Brown University in 1984 and an M.A. in art history from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, in 1990. She is senior curator of photography at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. In 2012 she organized Rineke Dijkstra: A Retrospective in collaboration with the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, as well as the Guggenheim’s presentation of SFMOMA’s exhibition Francesca Woodman. Other recent exhibitions include Haunted: Contemporary Photography/Video/Performance, which traveled to the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, and Catherine Opie: American Photographer. For the Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin, she curated True North and Jeff Wall: Exposure. During her tenure with the Guggenheim, she has also curated touring exhibitions such as Family Pictures: Contemporary Photographs and Videos from the Collection of the Guggenheim Museum; Speaking with Hands: Photographs from The Buhl Collection; and Rrose is a Rrose is a Rrose: Gender Performance in Photography. Ms. Blessing has contributed to numerous other museum exhibitions and catalogues, including Marina Abramovi´c’s performance series Seven Easy Pieces; Robert Mapplethorpe and the Classical Tradition; Premises: Invested Spaces in Visual Arts, Architecture & Design from France, 1958–1998; The Italian Metamorphosis, 1943–1968; Art of This Century; and Guggenheim Museum Collection: A to Z. At present she is organizing the forthcoming New York presentation of Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video, an exhibition originated by the Frist Center for the Visual Arts in Nashville, which is scheduled to appear at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in 2014, as well as a group exhibition tentatively titled Photo-Poetics: An Anthology. In addition to organizing photo- and media-based exhibitions and their accompanying catalogues for the Guggenheim and its affiliates, Ms. Blessing publishes and lectures widely on art and cultural practices involving photographic representation. She has taught at the School of Visual Arts and was appointed critic in photography at Yale in 2013.

Irma Boom Graphic designer. Ms. Boom is an Amsterdam-based graphic designer who specializes in making books. After earning her B.F.A. in graphic design from the AKI Art Academy in Enschedé, she worked for five years at the Dutch government publishing and printing office in The Hague. In 1991 she founded Irma Boom Office, which works nationally and internationally in both the cultural and commercial sectors. Clients include the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Aga Khan Foundation for Architects, the Museum of Modern Art, Prince Claus Fund, Koninklijke Tichelaar Makkum, Camper, Mallorca, Ferrari, Vitra International, the United Nations, and OMA/Rem Koolhaas. For five years she worked (editing and concept/design) on the 2,136-page SHV Think Book 1996–1896, commissioned by SHV Holdings in Utrecht and published in English and Chinese. Ms. Boom has been the recipient of many awards for her book designs and was the youngest ever laureate to receive the prestigious Gutenberg prize for her complete oeuvre. The University of Amsterdam manages the Irma Boom Archive, and the Museum of Modern Art in New York has acquired her work for the permanent collection in the Design and Architecture Department. She was appointed to the Yale faculty in 1992 and is currently senior critic in graphic design.

Matthew Carter Type designer. Mr. Carter began his career by studying punch cutting at the Enschedé printing house in Holland. After working as a lettering designer in London, he moved to New York City in 1965 to join the Mergenthaler Linotype Company as staff type designer. There he designed several typefaces including Cascade, Snell Roundhand, Helvetica Compressed, and Olympian, and faces for the Greek and Korean scripts. In 1971 Mr. Carter returned to London to work in continued association with the Linotype companies on faces for Hebrew and Devanagari, and on ITC Galliard, a series of classical romans and italics in four weights released in 1982. He designed Bell Centennial, the typeface currently used for telephone directories. He worked for ten years at Bitstream, Inc., the digital typefoundry of which he was one of the founders, where he designed Bitstream Charter. He is now a principal of Carter & Cone Type, Inc., in Cambridge, Massachusetts, a company that produces new typeface designs. Among those typefaces is Yale, designed for use in the University’s print and Web publications. Mr. Carter is a Royal Designer for Industry. He has received a Chrysler Award for Innovation in Design and medals from AIGA and the Type Directors Club. He has been senior critic at Yale since 1976.

Gregory Crewdson Photographer. Mr. Crewdson received a B.A. from the State University of New York at Purchase in 1985 and an M.F.A. in photography from Yale in 1988. He has exhibited widely in the United States and Europe and is represented by Gagosian Gallery in New York City. Mr. Crewdson’s work is represented in many public collections including the Museum of Modern Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, Brooklyn Museum, Los Angeles County Museum, and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. A retrospective of his work was shown as a traveling exhibition from 2005 to 2008 at major museums around Europe. Another traveling exhibition of his work opened at the Kulturhuset Museum, Stockholm, in February 2011, followed by Sorte Diamant, Copenhagen, and C/O Berlin, Berlin, among others. He has received numerous awards including the Skowhegan Medal for Photography, the National Endowment for the Arts Visual Artists Fellowship, and the Aaron Siskind Fellowship. Mr. Crewdson has published several books of his photographs including Hover (Artspace Books), Dream of Life (University of Salamanca, Spain), Twilight (Harry N. Abrams), Beneath the Roses (Harry N. Abrams), and a retrospective book of his work, Gregory Crewdson from 1985 to 2005 (Hatje Cantz). Mr. Crewdson’s newest body of work, Sanctuary, premiered at Gagosian Gallery in New York in 2010 and then traveled to White Cube in London and Gagosian Gallery in Rome. Abrams published a book featuring this work in 2010. Currently his work is in the traveling exhibition In a Lonely Place. He was appointed to the Yale faculty in 1993 and is associate professor and director of graduate studies in photography.

Glen Cummings Graphic designer. Mr. Cummings is a graphic designer based in New York City. He received a B.F.A. in graphic design from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and an M.F.A. in graphic design from Yale in 2002. He worked as designer/art director at 2x4 until 2008, leading projects for clients such as MTV, Prada, Chanel, Dallas Center for the Performing Arts, and the Muhammad Ali Center. His work has been published and acknowledged by the American Institute of Architects, the American Institute of Graphic Arts, Interior Design Magazine, and New York Times Magazine, and it has been exhibited by the AIGA and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Currently Mr. Cummings is partner at MTWTF, aka Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday, in New York City. He was appointed critic in graphic design in 2002.

Sheila Levrant de Bretteville Graphic designer and public artist. Ms. de Bretteville received a B.A. in art history from Barnard College in 1962, an M.F.A. from Yale University in 1964, and honorary degrees from the Maryland Institute College of Art, California College of the Arts, Moore College of Art, and Otis College of Art and Design. The American Institute of Graphic Arts designated her a “Design Legend” in 2006. Before opening the Sheila Studio in 1970 she worked as a designer for Chanticleer Press, Yale University Press, and Olivetti Pubblicità in Milan. In 1971 at the California Institute of the Arts, she created the first women’s design program and, in 1973, founded the Woman’s Building and its Women’s Graphic Center in Los Angeles. In 1981 she initiated and chaired the Department of Communication Design at Otis/Parsons. Her design work in books, magazines, and newspapers includes The Motown Album, the redesign of the Los Angeles Times, and special issues of the Aspen Times, Everywoman, American Cinematographer, and Arts in Society. Her posters and fine press editions are in the special collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, Centre Pompidou in Paris, and numerous university and public libraries. Her site-specific public artwork includes Biddy Mason: Time and Place and Omoide no Shotokyo in Los Angeles; Search: Literature in Flushing, New York; At the start…, At long last… in New York City’s Inwood A train station; Path of Stars and HILLHOUSE in New Haven; and Step(pe) in Yekaterinburg, Russia. Ms. de Bretteville joined the Yale School of Art faculty as its first tenured woman in 1990, when she was appointed professor and director of graduate studies in graphic design. In 2010 she was named the Caroline M. Street Professor of Graphic Design.

Liz Deschenes Photographer. Ms. Deschenes received a B.F.A. in 1988 from the Rhode Island School of Design. She has exhibited widely, including at the Walker Art Center; Campoli Presti, London and Paris; Secession Vienna; and Sutton Lane (Brussels, London, and Paris). She is represented by Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York. Ms. Deschenes was appointed critic at Yale in 2013.

Leslie Dick Artist and writer. Transplanted to London from her native New York at the age of ten, Ms. Dick received a B.A. in English literature from the University of Sussex in 1977 before beginning her work as a teacher and writer. She published two novels, Without Falling (1987) and Kicking (1992), and a book of short pieces, The Skull of Charlotte Corday and Other Stories (1995). She currently writes about art for various magazines, most recently X-TRA and East of Borneo. She has taught in the art program at California Institute of the Arts since 1992 and is deeply engaged in the discourse around contemporary art and culture. In 2008 she collaborated with artist Martin Kersels on a video installation, Ripcord, which was shown at Acme Gallery, Los Angeles. In 2010 she participated in the Whitney Biennial in New York, presenting a performance of psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan’s essay on the mirror stage, with projections of still and moving images, and a live performance by Das Racist. Also in 2010 she took part in the exhibition Separation Anxiety at the Wignall Museum of Contemporary Art, Rancho Cucamonga, California, presenting a photographic work and a performance called Boundary Lines, on the subject of maternal idealization of the body of the child. The exhibition subsequently traveled to Pelham, New York. In 2011 Ms. Dick gave two presentations: one on feminism at the Royal College of Art and another on her own work at Goldsmiths, University of London. In 2012 she participated in On Perfection, a conference at the Whitechapel Gallery in London. A book based on the conference is forthcoming. Ms. Dick was appointed critic in sculpture in 2012.

Jessica Dickinson Painter. Ms. Dickinson received a B.F.A. in 1997 from Maryland Institute College of Art and an M.F.A. from Cranbrook Academy of Art in 1999. She has participated in the BiennaleOnline2013 and group exhibitions at the Zublodowicz Collection (London), The Kitchen, Sikkema Jenkins & Co., Lehmann Maupin, Max Protetch, Andrew Kreps Gallery, and Cranbrook Art Museum, among others. Her solo exhibitions have been reviewed in Artforum, Art in America, and The New Yorker, among others. Ms. Dickinson has been awarded a Farpath Grant in Dijon, France (2008), a Change, Inc. grant (2003), and the Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundation Space Program (2001). She has taught at Cooper Union, Rhode Island School of Design, Maryland Institute College of Art, Pace University, and the University of Tennessee, Knoxville; been a visiting artist at Columbia University’s Summer Painting Intensive, Virginia Commonwealth University, Rutgers University, Cranbrook Academy of Art, Boston University, Massachusetts College of Art and Design; and participated in the College Art Association panel Abstract Painting at 100. Altman Siegel in San Francisco and James Fuentes in New York have held solo exhibitions of her work, and James Fuentes, where she is represented, plans a second solo exhibition in 2015. Ms. Dickinson was appointed critic in painting at Yale in 2012.

Philip-Lorca diCorcia Photographer. After attending the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Mr. diCorcia earned an M.F.A. from Yale in 1979. He has since worked in various aspects of the photographic medium, for which he has earned exhibitions, grants, fellowships, and awards. He is represented by numerous galleries. In 1995 the Museum of Modern Art published a book surveying his work, and other publications have followed. Twin Palms published A Storybook Life in 2003, his first self-produced book, which toured as an exhibition through 2005. Mr. diCorcia has been a critic at Yale at various times since 1996 and is currently senior critic.

Paul Elliman Graphic designer. Mr. Elliman is a London-based designer. His work explores the mutual impact of technology and language in ways that combine research and historical scholarship with a range of resources from typography to the human voice. Mr. Elliman’s work has been exhibited at London’s Tate Modern, New York’s New Museum of Contemporary Art, and the Kunsthalle Basel, and is included in collections at the Victoria and Albert Museum (London) and the Anyang Public Art Project (Korea). He has contributed essays to many international journals and magazines as well as catalogs and monographs for other artists. Mr. Elliman is also a thesis supervisor for Werkplaats Typografie, a graphic design program in Arnhem, the Netherlands. He was appointed to the Yale faculty in 1997 and is currently senior critic in graphic design.

Anoka Faruqee Painter. Ms. Faruqee received a B.A. from Yale University in 1994 and an M.F.A. from Tyler School of Art in 1997. She has exhibited her work in the United States, Asia, and the Middle East at such venues as Max Protetch and Monya Rowe galleries (New York), P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center (Queens), Albright-Knox Gallery (Buffalo), Angles Gallery (Los Angeles), Carl Berg Gallery (Los Angeles), Chicago Cultural Center, Zolla/Lieberman Gallery (Chicago), and Hosfelt Gallery (San Francisco and New York). She attended the Whitney Independent Study Program, the Skowhegan School of Art, and the P.S.1 National Studio Program. Grants include the Pollock-Krasner Foundation and Artadia. Ms. Faruqee has also taught at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and California Institute of the Arts, where she was codirector of the art program. Ms. Faruqee was appointed associate professor of painting/printmaking at Yale in 2011.

Rochelle Feinstein Painter and printmaker. Ms. Feinstein received a B.F.A. from Pratt Institute in 1975 and an M.F.A. from the University of Minnesota in 1978. She lives and works in New York City. Her work is exhibited widely in solo and group exhibitions in galleries and museums in the United States and Europe, and is included in numerous public and private collections. Among recent awards and grants she has received are a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Fellowship, a Joan Mitchell Foundation grant, and a Foundation for Contemporary Arts grant. In 2012 she was an artist in residence at the Foundation for Contemporary Arts in Accra, Ghana, under the auspices of the U.S. State Department Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and the Bronx Museum. During the 2012–2013 academic year while on leave from Yale, she was a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University. She will have a major survey of her work at Kunsthalle Bern in May 2015. Ms. Feinstein was appointed to the Yale faculty in 1994 and is professor and director of graduate studies in painting/printmaking.

Tobias Frere-Jones Type designer. Mr. Frere-Jones received his B.F.A. from Rhode Island School of Design in 1992. In 2000 he began work with Jonathan Hoefler in New York. He has designed over 500 typefaces for retail publication, custom clients, and experimental purposes. His clients include Martha Stewart Living, GQ, Wired, Nike, Hewlett-Packard, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, Grand Central Terminal, the U.S. Census Bureau, Tibor Kalman, and Neville Brody. He has lectured throughout North America, Europe, and Australia, and his work has been featured in How, I.D., Page, Print, Communication Arts, Metropolis, Esquire, and Time. In 2006 he became the first American to receive the Gerrit Noordzij Award, presented by the Royal Academy of The Hague in honor of his special contributions to typography. He was appointed critic in graphic design in 1996.

Munro Galloway Artist. Mr. Galloway received a B.A. in art semiotics from Brown University and an M.F.A. in painting from Bard College in 2006. He has exhibited in the United States and Europe, including solo exhibitions at Murray Guy gallery in New York and the Ohio State University, and has taught in the M.F.A. program in art criticism and writing at the School of Visual Arts and at Paris College of Art. He has worked as a translator and assistant editor at Art Press magazine in Paris and as a production designer at The New York Times Magazine, Travel and Leisure, and Time Out New York. Mr. Galloway is a cofounder of Soloway, an independent gallery space in Brooklyn, and a contributor to Paper Monument. He was appointed lecturer in painting/printmaking in 2013.

John Gambell Graphic designer. Mr. Gambell received a B.A. in English from Middlebury College in 1971. From 1977 to 1979 he studied printmaking and graphic design at Wesleyan University and worked on a range of photographic printing projects under the direction of Richard Benson in Newport, Rhode Island. After receiving his M.F.A. from Yale University in 1981, he served as graphic designer at the Yale University Printing Service. In 1987 he established a design studio in New Haven that produced a range of print publications and museum exhibition catalogs, as well as signage and packaging. He has been teaching graphic design since 1983 and was appointed senior critic in 1998. Mr. Gambell is the Yale University Printer.

Barbara Glauber Graphic designer. Ms. Glauber received her B.F.A. from SUNY, Purchase, in 1984 and her M.F.A. from the California Institute of the Arts in 1990. She runs her New York-based studio, Heavy Meta, focusing on the design of publications, information graphics, and other materials for clients in the arts, education, and entertainment industries. She curated the 1993 exhibition Lift and Separate: Graphic Design and the Quote Unquote Vernacular at Cooper Union, and she edited its accompanying publication. She also served as chair for the eighteenth annual American Center for Design 100 Show. She was appointed to the Yale faculty in 1995 and is currently critic in graphic design.

Neil Goldberg Artist. Mr. Goldberg received a B.A. in history and computer science from Brown University in 1985. He has been exhibiting installation-oriented video, photo­graphic, and sculptural work since 1992 at museums, galleries, and other art venues internationally, including the Museum of Modern Art (permanent collection); the New Museum of Contemporary Art; the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum; the Kitchen; the Jewish Museum; Lothringer13 Städtische Kunsthalle, Munich; and the Centre de Cultura Contemporània de Barcelona. In 2012 his work was the subject of a midcareer survey at the Museum of the City of New York, entitled “Stories the City Tells Itself.” He has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the New York State Council on the Arts, the Experimental Television Center, CEC ArtsLink, Yaddo, and the MacDowell Colony. Mr. Goldberg has been a visiting artist at Yale, Cooper Union, the School of Visual Arts, Parsons, and New York University, among others. He was appointed critic in graphic design at Yale in 2013.

Michelle Grabner Painter. Ms. Grabner earned a B.F.A. in 1984 and an M.A. in 1987 in art history at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee. She received an M.F.A. from Northwestern University in 1990. She is professor and chair of painting and drawing at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a regular contributor to Artforum, art-agenda, and X-TRA. In 2010 she coedited The Studio Reader (University of Chicago Press). She has exhibited nationally and internationally, including at the Musée d’art moderne Grand-Duc Jean, Luxembourg; Tate St. Ives, U.K.; Stadtgalerie Keil; Kunsthalle Bern; Daimler Contemporary, Berlin; Midway Contemporary Art, Minneapolis; Rocket, London; INOVA, Milwaukee; Southfirst, Brooklyn; Gallery 16, San Francisco; Cranbrook Art Museum, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan; Feigen, Inc., New York; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Milwaukee Art Museum; Bricks and Kicks, Vienna; Turbinehallerne, Copenhagen; Ulrich Museum of Art, Wichita, Kansas; and Green Gallery, Milwaukee. Ms. Grabner is represented by Shane Campbell Gallery, Chicago and Anne Mosseri-Marlio Galerie, Zurich. With her husband, Brad Killam, she also runs two artist spaces, the Suburban in Chicago and the Poor Farm in northeastern Wisconsin. She was appointed visiting professor of painting/printmaking in 2011.

Kate Greene Photographer. Ms. Greene received a B.F.A. in photography from Massachusetts College of Art and Design in 2008 and an M.F.A. in photography in 2010 from Yale School of Art, where she was the recipient of the Tierney Fellowship. During her graduate years she worked as a Wurtele Gallery Teacher at the Yale University Art Gallery and went on to serve as interim assistant curator of public education there in 2011–12. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally and was most recently included in Terra Cognita at the Museum Dr8888 (Drachten) in the Netherlands as well as Looking at the Land at the RISD Museum in Providence, Rhode Island. She was appointed lecturer in photography at Yale in 2013.

Josephine Halvorson Artist. Ms. Halvorson received a B.F.A. from the Cooper Union in 2003 and an M.F.A. from Columbia University in 2007, and she attended the Art Division of the Yale Summer School of Music and Art in 2002. She is the recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship to Vienna, Austria (2003–4), a Tiffany Foundation Award (2009), and an NYFA Fellowship in Painting (2010). Ms. Halvorson has enjoyed yearlong residencies in Paris as a Harriet Hale Woolley Scholar at the Fondation des États-Unis (2007–8), and in Brooklyn at the Marie Walsh Sharpe Space Program (2009–10). Her work is represented by Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York, and upcoming exhibitions include Perceiving Place at Alfred University, Between Picture and Viewer: The Image in Contemporary Painting at the School of Visual Arts, and Americana at Hunter College. She has taught at Columbia University and been a visiting artist at Rutgers University; the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Vassar College; Massachusetts College of Art and Design; and Yale Summer School of Music and Art. She was appointed critic in painting/printmaking at Yale in 2010 and again in 2012.

Melissa Harris Editor and curator. Ms. Harris received a B.A. from Yale University in 1982. She is the editor-in-chief of Aperture magazine and the editor/curator of selected projects for the Aperture Foundation. She has also edited numerous publications and has curated and co-curated photography exhibitions throughout the United States and Europe at venues that include Aperture Gallery in New York; Visa Pour l’Image in Perpignan, France; the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Institute of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia; DiverseWorks in Houston; Villa Pignatelli in Naples; the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice; and the Milano Triennale in Milan. She is also a contributing editor to Interview Magazine and occasionally guest curates, guest lectures, and writes for numerous arts publications. Before Aperture, she worked at Artforum. She served on Community Board Five in New York City for four years, and she is a member of the board of Michael “Nick” Nichols’s LOOK3: Festival of the Photograph, Donna Ferrato’s Domestic Abuse Awareness Project (DAAP), and the John Cage Trust. She teaches at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts in the photography and imaging department. Ms. Harris was appointed critic in photography in 2011.

Elana Herzog Artist. Ms. Herzog received a B.A. from Bennington College in 1976 and an M.F.A. from Alfred University in 1979. In 2014 her work was on view in a solo exhibition, Plumb Pulp, at LMAKprojects in New York City. She is preparing for a two-person show at the Pierogi Boiler in Brooklyn, New York, also in 2014. Ms. Herzog is a 2014 resident at the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation in Bethany, Connecticut, and was recently in residence at Gertrude Contemporary in Melbourne, Australia, where she did work at the Australian Print Workshop. Dewarped and Unweft, a survey of her work since 1993, was at the Daum Museum of Contemporary Art in Missouri in 2009. Her other solo and two-person exhibition venues include the Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art in Connecticut, Smack Mellon and the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art in New York, and DiverseWorks in Houston, Texas. Her work has been exhibited internationally at the Reykjavik Art Museum, Iceland, and in Sweden at Göteborgs Konsthall and at Gustavsbergs Konsthall. Ms. Herzog is the 2012 Fellow of the Saint-Gaudens Memorial in Cornish, New Hampshire, which recently mounted an exhibition of her work. She is the recipient of a 2009 Anonymous Was A Woman Award, a 2007 Louis Comfort Tiffany Award, 2007 and 1999 NYFA Artists’ Fellowships, the 2004 Lillian Elliot Award, a 2003 Lambent Fellowship in the Arts, and a 1999 Joan Mitchell Foundation grant. She was a 2008–9 Workspace Resident of both the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council and Dieu Donné Paper. In 2010 she was awarded grants from the Farpath Foundation and the Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundation. Ms. Herzog is represented by LMAKprojects in New York City. She was appointed lecturer in sculpture in 2011.

Allen Hori Graphic designer. Mr. Hori received a B.F.A. in photography from the University of Hawaii and earned an M.F.A. in design from Cranbrook Academy of Art, after which he received a Fulbright Grant to study in The Netherlands. Mr. Hori is principal at Bates Hori, New York, a graphic design and visual research studio. The studio’s work has been recognized by New York Type Directors, American Center for Design, AIGA, and I.D. magazine and published in Emigre, Eye, IDEA, Studio Voice, and +81, as well as the books Cranbrook Design: The New Discourse, Typography Now, The Graphic Edge, Mixing Messages, Typography Now Two, Graphic Design New York 2, Dutch Posters 1960–1996, and Studio Dumbar: Behind the Seen. Mr. Hori has lectured widely at various design schools and professional symposia, including “Designer as Editor” at the Design Institute in Amsterdam and “Displaced Voices” at Gallery DDD in Osaka. Bates Hori has been named as one of I.D.’s Top Forty Influential Designers. Mr. Hori was appointed to the Yale faculty in 2000 and is currently critic in graphic design.

Pamela Hovland Graphic designer. Ms. Hovland received a B.S. in design and communications from Bemidji State University in 1983 and an M.F.A. from Yale University in 1993. She has worked extensively in the areas of identity and print communications and Web design for corporations, nonprofit organizations, and cultural institutions. Her work has been recognized by the American Institute of Graphic Arts, the New York Type Director’s Club, Emigre, Print, I.D., and Eye, among others, and has been included in many exhibitions. She is a founding member of Class Action, the art collective that uses design to effect social change. She was the recipient of the Rome Prize Fellowship in design in 2005–6. Ms. Hovland was appointed to the Yale faculty in 1993 and is currently senior critic in graphic design.

Brent Howard Sculptor. Mr. Howard received his B.F.A. from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 1999 and his M.F.A. from Hunter College (CUNY) in New York City in 2002. He has exhibited his work in various galleries in New York, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C. He is the president and founder of Soapstone Studios in Brooklyn, New York, where his clients have included Yoko Ono, Dennis Oppenheim, David Byrne, and Nari Ward. Mr. Howard worked for many years in close collaboration with Louise Bourgeois, for whom he created many pieces including Maman (2001) and Spider Couple (2003). Mr. Howard was appointed lecturer in sculpture in 2009.

David Humphrey Painter. Mr. Humphrey received a B.F.A. from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 1977 and an M.A. in liberal studies from New York University in 1980. He lives and works in New York City and is represented by Sikkema Jenkins and Co. His first show was with the McKee Gallery in 1984, and he has since been exhibiting nationally and internationally. His work is in the permanent collections of the Walker Art Center, the Carnegie Institute, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, among others. He received the Rome prize in 2007, a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2002, fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, and two New York Foundation Grants. He wrote a column for Art issues from 1989 until the journal’s demise in 2002 and is a periodic contributor to Art in America. An anthology of his writing, Blind Handshake, was released in 2009 by Periscope Publishing. Mr. Humphrey was appointed critic in 2007.

Deborah Kass Painter. Ms. Kass studied at the Art Students League and the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program and received her B.F.A. in painting from Carnegie Mellon University in 1974. Her work is in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Jewish Museum, Whitney Museum of American Art, Cincinnati Art Museum, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and New Orleans Museum of Art, among others. She has exhibited internationally at the Venice Biennale, the Istanbul Biennale, and the Museum Ludwig, Cologne. Ms. Kass has received grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York Foundation for the Arts. She is represented by the Paul Kasmin Gallery and Vincent Fremont. Ms. Kass was appointed senior critic in painting/printmaking in 2005.

Lisa Kereszi Photographer. Ms. Kereszi graduated from Bard College with a B.A. in photography and a minor in literature/creative writing in 1995. In 2000 she received an M.F.A. in photography from Yale University. She recently was a MacDowell Fellow and a Gardner Fellowship finalist. Her work is in many private and public collections including the Whitney Museum of American Art, the New Museum of Contemporary Art, the Brooklyn Museum of Art, the Study Collection of the Museum of Modern Art, the Berkeley Art Museum, and the Yale University Art Gallery. She is represented by Yancey Richardson Gallery in New York, where she had solo shows in 2005, 2006, 2009, and 2012. Other recent solo shows were held at Drew University in Madison, New Jersey, and at Robert Morat Galerie in Berlin in 2013. She was commissioned to photograph Governor’s Island by the Public Art Fund, a project that culminated in shows at the Urban Center Gallery and the Mayor’s Office at City Hall and a book. She has three other books in print, Fantasies (2008), Fun and Games (2009), and Joe’s Junk Yard (2012). An upcoming artist’s book is due to be published in fall 2014. Ms. Kereszi has been a visiting artist/critic at many schools and universities. She was appointed to the Yale faculty in 2004 and is currently critic in photography and director of undergraduate studies in art.

Martin Kersels Sculptor. Mr. Kersels was born in Los Angeles and attended UCLA, receiving a B.A. in art in 1984 and an M.F.A. in 1995. His body of work ranges from collaborative performances with the group SHRIMPS (1984–93) to large-scale sculptures such as Tumble Room (2001). His interest in machines, entropy, sound, and dissolution has produced work that examines the dynamic tension between failure and success, the individual and the group, and the thin line between humor and misfortune. Since 1994, Mr. Kersels’s objects and projects have been exhibited at museums both nationally and internationally, including the 1997 Whitney Biennial, the Centre Pompidou, MOCA Los Angeles, the Museum Tinguely, Kunsthalle Bern, and the J. Paul Getty Museum. A survey of his work, Heavyweight Champion, was organized and exhibited by the Tang Museum in 2007 and the Santa Monica Museum of Art in 2008. His room-sized sculpture 5 Songs, and an accompanying performance series, Live on 5 Songs, was on view in the 2010 Whitney Biennial. Before joining the faculty at Yale he was a faculty member and co-director of the art program at the California Institute of the Arts. Mr. Kersels was appointed associate professor and director of graduate studies in sculpture in 2012.

Patrick Killoran Sculptor. Mr. Killoran received a B.F.A. in 1995 from Tyler School of Art. Since the mid-1990s, his work has addressed consumerism’s effect on conceptions of public space. Much of his work explores the inevitable contradictions that arise with the terms “public space” and “public art,” specifically addressing consumer behavior and the products of consumer culture. His installation Immergence was presented at Las Cienegas Projects in Los Angeles in 2009 and at Hyde Park Art Center in 2010. He has also presented solo projects at the Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford, Connecticut; Ikon in Birmingham, United Kingdom; and SculptureCenter in New York. Mr. Killoran has been included in numerous international exhibitions, including every day, the 1998 Biennale of Sydney; Wanås 2000 at the Wanås Foundation in Sweden; All About Laughter at the Mori Art Museum in Tokyo; Behind the Green Door at Harris Lieberman Gallery in New York; and the One-on-One Festival in London in 2010 and 2011. He has attended residencies at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Art in General’s Eastern European Residency Exchange at the Jeleni Studio Program in the Czech Republic, and Civitella Ranieri in Umbertide, Italy. Grants received include Rema Hort Mann Foundation and Penny McCall Foundation. In 2010 Mr. Killoran was the artist in residence at the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities at Northwestern University as a grant recipient of the James B. Pick and Rosalyn M. Laudati Funds for Arts Computing. He was appointed critic in sculpture in 2012.

Byron Kim Painter. Mr. Kim received a B.A. from Yale University in 1983 and attended Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 1986. He has received numerous awards including the Alpert Award, a Ucross Foundation fellowship, and a Joan Mitchell Foundation Grant. He has been exhibiting in solo and two-person shows since 1992 and has shown with artists such as Kiki Smith and Glenn Ligon. Mr. Kim has participated in group exhibition across the United States and in Korea, Poland, Spain, the United Kingdom, Germany, and Canada. His work is in the permanent collections of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo; the Art Institute of Chicago; the Berkeley Art Museum; the Blanton Museum of Art, Austin; the Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, D.C.; the Museum of Contemporary Art, La Jolla; the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; the Norton Family Collection, Santa Monica; the Wadsworth Athenaeum, Hartford; the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; the Whitney Museum of American Art; and the Worcester Art Museum. It has been reviewed in The New York Times, Artforum, NY Arts, The New Yorker, The Washington Post, Art in America, Newsweek, The Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, New York Magazine, Frieze, Time Magazine, and the Village Voice. Mr. Kim lives and works in New York and is represented by James Cohan Gallery. He was appointed senior critic in painting/printmaking in 2009 and again in 2012.

Joy Jeehye Kim Art historian. Ms. Kim received a B.A. in art history from the University of Chicago in 2003 and an M.A. from University College London in 2006. Currently a doctoral candidate in the Department of the History of Art at Yale, she previously worked in several museums and galleries, including New York’s Museum of Modern Art and the Art Institute of Chicago. Her research and teaching interests include the intersection of artistic practices and postwar camera technologies, media theory, and art criticism. Ms. Kim was appointed lecturer at the Yale School of Art in 2012.

Sarah Lasley Artist and filmmaker. Ms. Lasley received a B.F.A. in 2005 from the University of Louisville in Kentucky and an M.F.A. in painting from Yale University in 2008. She has taught video art at Vassar College, Kentucky School of Art, and the Digital Media Academy and has led video production workshops with the New York Theatre Network. She was the videographer for Amanda Palmer and The Grand Theft Orchestra’s 2012 world tour and has done video production for Martha Stewart Living magazine, Naked in a Fishbowl (Cherry Lane Theatre), STREB: Kiss the Air! (Park Avenue Armory), and the film version of Michael McQuilken’s live performance JIB (Yale School of Drama). Ms. Lasley taught at Yale from 2008 to 2010 and was most recently appointed lecturer in 2012.

Sarah Lewis Writer and curator. Ms. Lewis received an A.B.in 2001 from Harvard University and an M.Phil. from the University of Oxford in 2003, and she is a doctoral student at Yale University. She currently serves on President Obama’s Arts Policy Committee and has held curatorial positions at the Tate Modern and the Museum of Modern Art. She is also on the curatorial advisory committee at the Barclays Center and at Madison Square Park. She sits on many boards including the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, the CUNY Graduate Center, and the Brearley School. Her writing on contemporary art has been published widely in journals such as Callaloo, Artforum, and Art in America, and by such publishers as Rizzoli, the Smithsonian, the Museum of Modern Art, and the Studio Museum in Harlem. Her dissertation, “Frederick Douglass, The Circassian Beauties, and American Racial Formation,” for which she has received support from the Ford Foundation and the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition, is under contract with Harvard University Press (2014). She is currently finishing her book “Rise: How Success Grows out of Setbacks,” under contract with Simon & Schuster (2014). Drawing on her work in the arts, and expanding into sports, business, psychology, sociology, and science, the book explores iconic ascents and wildly successful human endeavors built on improbable, failed foundations. Ms. Lewis was selected for Oprah’s Power List and Dell’s #Inspire 100 list. She has taught in painting/printmaking intermittently since 2007 and is currently critic in photography.

Barbara London Curator and writer. Ms. London received a B.A. from Hiram College in 1968 and an M.A. from the Institute of Fine Arts, NYU, in 1972. She founded the video exhibition and collection programs at the Museum of Modern Art, where she was a curator between 1973 and 2013. The exhibitions she organized include one-person shows featuring early mavericks Nam June Paik, Bill Viola, Steina Vasulka, Joan Jonas, Shigeko Kubota, Peter Campus, Gary Hill, Valie Export, and Laurie Anderson. She was the first curator in the United States to showcase the work of Asian artists Song Dong, Teiji Furuhashi, Feng Mengbo, and Yang Fudong. Her thematic projects have included Video from Tokyo to Fukui and Kyoto; New Video from China; Anime!; Stillness (Michael Snow/Sam Taylor-Wood); Automatic Update; Looking at Music, parts 1–3; Through the Weeping Glass: On Consolations of Life Everlasting (Limbos & Afterbreezes in the Mütter Museum) with the Quay Brothers; and most recently, Soundings: A Contemporary Score at MoMA. Ms. London was the first to integrate the Internet as part of curatorial practice, putting daily dispatches online for such projects as Stir-fry (1994), Internyet (1998), and dot.jp (1999). Ms. London has taught at NYU and the School of Visual Arts, and her writings have appeared in such publications as Artforum, Yishu, Leonardo, ArtAsiaPacific, Art in America, Modern Painters, and Image Forum. She received a Gertrude Contemporary Visiting Curator Residency, Melbourne (2012) and a Dora Maar House Residency, Ménerbes (2010). Through a CEC ArtsLink award (summer 2003) she investigated media art in Warsaw, Kraków, and Gdan´sk. She received a Japanese government Bunkacho Fellowship (winter 1992–93) and a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship (winter 1988–89) to further professional development and investigate new trends in electronic technologies and the effects on the creation and distribution of the arts in Japan. Ms. London was appointed critic at Yale in 2013.

Michelle Lopez Sculptor. Ms. Lopez earned a B.A. in literature and art history from Barnard College in 1992 and an M.F.A. from the School of Visual Arts in 1994. She has had solo exhibitions with Feature Inc., Deitch Projects, Simon Preston Gallery, LAXArt, Gallery Paule Anglim (San Francisco), and Fondazione Nicola Trussardi (Milan). Notable group exhibitions include MoMA PS1, Public Art Fund, Orange County Museum of Art California Biennial, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, and the Brooklyn Museum. Ms. Lopez has been reviewed in Artforum, New York Times, Art in America, Frieze, and Newsweek. She received a New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) fellowship grant in sculpture (2011), UC Berkeley research grants (2002–5), and NYFA fiscal sponsorship (2009). She was previously an assistant professor of sculpture at UC Berkeley and headed the sculpture division in both undergraduate and graduate studies. She has also taught in the M.F.A. Fine Arts program at the School of Visual Arts and in the Bard M.F.A. program. Ms. Lopez was appointed lecturer in sculpture in 2012.

Marie Lorenz Printmaker and sculptor. Ms. Lorenz received a B.F.A. from Rhode Island School of Design in 1995 and an M.F.A. from Yale in 2002. In addition to the Alice Kimball English Traveling Fellowship awarded at Yale, she has received grants from Artists Space, Socrates Sculpture Park, and the Harpo Foundation. In 2008 she was awarded the Joseph H. Hazen Rome Prize from the American Academy in Rome. Her work has been shown at High Desert Test Sites in Joshua Tree, California, and at Artists Space in New York, and she has completed solo projects at Ikon in Birmingham, England; Artpace in San Antonio, Texas; and Jack Hanley Gallery in New York. Her ongoing project The Tide and Current Taxi is an exploration of the coastline in New York City. Ms. Lorenz was appointed assistant professor in painting/printmaking in 2009.

Sandra Luckow Filmmaker. Ms. Luckow is an award-winning documentarian who teaches film production for the School of Art and Barnard College. As a Yale undergraduate, she made her first documentary, Sharp Edges, which won the Louis Sudler Prize in the Performing and Creative Arts. Portions of the film appeared on the CBS program 60 Minutes eight years later. She received an M.F.A. from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. Her documentary film Belly Talkers, a cross-country road trip that explored the art of ventriloquism, premiered in competition at the 1996 Sundance Film Festival. She has also worked as an associate director on ABC’s One Life to Live. She is a member of the International Documentary Association and the Directors Guild of America. She founded Ojeda Films, Inc., as an independent film company devoted to the development and execution of documentary art. She is currently writing a screenplay based on a World War II Dutch memoir. Ms. Luckow was appointed critic in film production in 1998 and is the director of production of the Yale Summer Film Institute.

Roxana Marcoci Curator. Ms. Marcoci received a Ph.D. in art history, theory, and criticism from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, in 1998. She is curator of photography at the Museum of Modern Art, where her most recent exhibitions are The Shaping of New Visions: Photography, Film, Photobook; and Taryn Simon: A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters I–XVIII (both 2012). In 2011 she was a fellow at the Center for Curatorial Leadership. Other MoMA exhibitions accompanied by major publications include the retrospective Sanja Ivekovi´c: Sweet Violence (2011); The Original Copy: Photography of Sculpture, 1839 to Today (2010); Pictures by Women: A History of Modern Photography (2010); Jan De Cock: Denkmal 11 (2008); the retrospective Take Your Time: Olafur Eliasson (2008); Comic Abstraction: Image-Breaking, Image-Making (2007); the retrospective Thomas Demand (2005); and Counter-Monuments and Memory (2000). Ms. Marcoci also curated numerous exhibitions focused on contemporary artists, such as Staging Action: Performance in Photography Since 1960 (2011); New Photography 2010; Geometry of Motion 1920s/1970s (2008); and New Photography 2008. She is currently at work on the retrospective exhibition Christopher Williams Presents… and the exhibition From Bauhaus to Buenos Aires: Horacio Coppola and Grete Stern. She has lectured and published extensively on issues of modern and contemporary art. Her most recent essays include “The Age of the Image” in Mutations (2011) and “From Face to Mask: Collage, Montage, and Assemblage in Contemporary Portraiture” in Modern Women: Women Artists at The Museum of Modern Art (2010). Her book The Original Copy: Photography of Sculpture, 1839 to Today (MoMA, 2010) and its German edition published by Hatje Cantz (with contributions by Geoffrey Batchen and Tobia Bezzola) received the Outstanding Catalogue Based on an Exhibition award from the Association of Art Museum Curators. Ms. Marcoci was appointed critic in photography in 2012.

Karel Martens Graphic designer. Mr. Martens completed his education at the Arnhem Academy of Art and Industrial Arts (Holland) in 1961. Since then he has worked as a freelance graphic designer, specializing in typography. In addition to commissioned work, he has always made prints and three-dimensional work. Among his clients have been the publishers Van Loghum Slaterus in Arnhem in the 1960s, and the SUN (Socialistiese Uitgeverij Nijmegen) in the years 1975–81. As well as designing books and printed matter, he has designed stamps and telephone cards (for the Dutch PTT). He has also designed signs and typographic facades for a number of buildings. In 2005 he designed the glass facades of the new part of the building for the Philharmonie in Haarlem; this design was based on a music score by Louis Andriessen. Among his awards have been the H. N. Werkman Prize (1993) for the design of the architectural journal Oase, and the Dr. A. H. Heineken Prize for the Arts (1996). A monograph about his work, Karel Martens: Printed Matter, was published as part of the Heineken Prize. Mr. Martens has taught graphic design since 1977, first at the Arnhem Academy and later (1994–97) at the Jan van Eyck Academy in Maastricht. In 1997, with Wigger Bierma, he founded the Typography Workshop within the Arnhem Academy of Art, where he shares the artistic supervision of students with Armand Mevis. Mr. Martens was appointed to the Yale faculty in 1997 and is currently senior critic in graphic design.

Samuel Messer Painter. Mr. Messer received a B.F.A. from Cooper Union in 1976 and an M.F.A. from Yale University in 1981. He is represented by Nielsen Gallery, Boston, and Shoshana Wayne Gallery, Los Angeles. His work may be found in public collections including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Art Institute of Chicago, and Yale University Art Gallery. Mr. Messer has received awards including a Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation grant in 1984, the Engelhard Award in 1985, a Pollock-Krasner Foundation grant in 1993, and a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1996. He collaborated with Paul Auster on The Story of My Typewriter, and with Denis Johnson on Cloud of Chalk. He was appointed senior critic at Yale in 1994 and in 2005 was appointed associate dean and professor (adjunct). He also serves as director of the art division of the Yale Summer School of Music and Art in Norfolk.

Dan Michaelson Graphic designer. Mr. Michaelson received a B.A. in history from Columbia University in 1997 and an M.F.A. in graphic design from Yale University in 2002. He has worked as a designer at Pentagram and at 2x4 in New York City. He is a partner in the design practice Linked By Air. In 2004 he was awarded a Charles Nypels grant for research on embedded digital sign systems. Mr. Michaelson was appointed lecturer in graphic design in 2005 and senior critic in 2012.

Meredith Miller Photographer. Ms. Miller received her undergraduate degree in Latin American studies and visual art from the University of Chicago in 1998 before earning an M.F.A. in photography in 2003 from Yale University, where she also won the School of Art’s Blair Dickinson Memorial Prize. She received artist’s fellowships from the Connecticut Commission on Culture and Tourism in 2006 and in 2012. Her work has been exhibited in group exhibitions throughout New England as well as in New York and California, and her photographs are included in the collections of the Danforth Museum of Art and the Yale University Art Gallery. She has attended artist residencies at the Vermont Studio Center, the Artists’ Enclave at I-Park, and Wilson College. Ms. Miller has taught photography and art history as an adjunct instructor at several area colleges. She currently works as a photographer at Yale’s Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library and teaches photography at Southern Connecticut State University. She was appointed lecturer in photography at Yale in 2013.

Manuel Miranda Graphic designer. Mr. Miranda received a B.A. from the Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington, in 1996, and an M.F.A. in graphic design from Yale in 2005. His current projects include exhibition design for the Sheila C. Johnson Design Center at Parsons, institutional identity for Van Alen Institute, citywide campaigns for NYC & Company, and publication design for the Center for Urban Pedagogy. Prior to establishing his own studio, he was a designer at Brand Integration Group at Ogilvy & Mather and an art director at 2x4, Inc., where he designed and led projects for New York City Opera, Tiffany & Co., and the Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum. His work has been cited in The Advocate, Art21, Design Observer, Gothamist, New York Magazine, and Urban Omnibus, and exhibited at the Art Directors Club and the Center for Architecture. Mr. Miranda was appointed critic in graphic design at Yale in 2011.

Sigi Moeslinger Graphic designer. Ms. Moeslinger is a partner at Antenna Design New York Inc., which she co-founded with Masamichi Udagawa in 1997. Antenna’s design projects range from public and commercial to experimental and artistic, typically spanning object, interface, and environment. Among Antenna’s best-known projects are the design of New York City subway cars and ticket vending machines, JetBlue check-in kiosks, Bloomberg displays, and interactive environments, such as Power Flower, an installation in the windows of Bloomingdale’s activated by passersby. Antenna’s user-centered design approach helps understand human behavior, which is particularly important when designing the unfamiliar, elicited by new technology. Antenna’s work has won numerous awards, including recognition from Business Week/IDSA, I.D., Fast Company, and Wired magazines. In 2006 Ms. Moeslinger and Mr. Udagawa were named United States Artists Target Fellows in the Architecture and Design category. In 2008 Antenna won the National Design Award in Product Design from the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum. Before forming Antenna, Ms. Moeslinger was an Interval Research Fellow at New York University, where she designed and built digitally enhanced objects. Prior, she was at IDEO in San Francisco, working on corporate product design languages, consumer products, and equipment, as well as future scenarios for new technology products. She holds a master’s degree in interactive telecommunications from New York University and a B.S. in industrial design from Art Center College of Design. She joined the Yale faculty in 2005 and is currently senior critic in graphic design.

Rick Moody Novelist. Mr. Moody graduated from Brown University in 1983 and received an M.F.A. from Columbia University in 1986. His first novel, Garden State, was the winner of the 1991 Editors’ Book Award from the Pushcart Press and was published in 1992. The Ice Storm was published in May 1994 by Little, Brown & Co. Foreign editions have been published in twenty countries. (A film version, directed by Ang Lee, was released by Fox Searchlight Pictures in 1997.) A collection of short fiction, The Ring of Brightest Angels Around Heaven, was published by Little, Brown & Co. in August 1995; the title story was the winner of the 1994 Aga Khan Prize from The Paris Review. Mr. Moody’s third novel, Purple America, was published in April 1997. In 1998 he received the Addison M. Metcalf Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. In 2000 he received a Guggenheim fellowship. In 2000 he published a collection of short fiction, Demonology, also published in Spain, France, Brazil, Germany, the Netherlands, Portugal, Italy, the United Kingdom, and elsewhere. In May 2002 Little, Brown & Co. issued The Black Veil: A Memoir with Digressions, which won the PEN/Martha Albrand Award for the Art of the Memoir in 2003 and was a NAMI-NYC Metro recommended book. Since that time he has published two novels, The Diviners and The Four Fingers of Death, and a volume of essays, On Celestial Music. His short fiction and journalism have been anthologized in Best American Short Stories 2001, Best American Essays 2004, Year’s Best Science Fiction #9, and in Pushcart Prize anthologies. He has taught at SUNY Purchase and New York University and was appointed critic in photography at Yale in 2011.

Shirin Neshat Photographer and filmmaker. Born in Qazvin, Iran, Ms. Neshat moved to the United States in 1974 and earned B.F.A. and M.F.A. degrees from the University of California, Berkeley. She has had solo exhibitions at the Museo de Arte Moderno, Mexico City; Contemporary Arts Museum Houston; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Castello di Rivoli, Turin; Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus; the Art Institute of Chicago; Serpentine Gallery, London; Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Castilla y León (Spain); and the Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin. She has also been included in major group shows internationally, including Prospect.1 in New Orleans in 2008, Documenta XI in Kassel in 2002, the 2000 Whitney Biennial, and the 1999 Venice Biennale. Among her many awards are the Lillian Gish Prize (2006), the Hiroshima Freedom Prize (2005), and the First International Award at the Venice Biennale (1999). Her first feature-length film, Women without Men, received the Silver Lion for best director at the Venice International Film Festival in 2009. Ms. Neshat was appointed critic in photography in 2013.

Gisela Noack Bookbinder/Conservator. Ms. Noack graduated from Chemieschule Ehlhard in Munich, Germany. She studied bookbinding and restoration with Jane Greenfield and worked as a conservation bookbinder in the conservation department of Yale University Library from 1976 through 2007. In 1983 she was appointed chief conservator and head of conservation; Ms. Noack retired from this position in 2007. She continues to teach bookbinding and conservation classes at the Creative Arts Workshop in New Haven. Ms. Noack was appointed lecturer in bookbinding in the graphic design program at Yale in 1989.

Sarah Oppenheimer Artist. Ms. Oppenheimer received a B.A. from Brown University in 1995 and an M.F.A. in painting from Yale University in 1999. Recent projects include MF-142 at Annely Juda, London; VP-41 at Art Unlimited, Basel; and Automatic Cities at the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego. Her work has been exhibited at such venues as the Drawing Center, the Sculpture Center, Skulpturens Hus (Stockholm), the Saint Louis Art Museum, and the Mattress Factory among others. She is the recipient of a Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Fellowship 2009, a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship 2007, an American Academy of Arts and Letters Award in Art 2007, an NYFA fellowship (in the category of Architecture/Environmental Structures) 2006, and a Rema Hort Mann Foundation Fellowship 2003. Ms. Oppenheimer joined the Yale faculty in 2003 and was appointed critic in painting/printmaking in 2005.

Thomas Palmer Printer. Following high school, Mr. Palmer worked odd jobs, studied graphic design, and worked at the Brooklyn Academy of Music as art director. In 1982 he began a four-year apprenticeship with Richard Benson learning techniques of photographic reproduction centered around the printing of the limited edition of Photographs from the Collection of the Gilman Paper Company. From 1986 to 1996 he worked in a variety of photographic media: platinum printing, photogravure, offset lithography. He currently makes digital image captures and separations for commercially printed photography books. Highlights include The Waking Dream; Passage; The Kiss of Apollo; Lee Friedlander: Letters from the People; Ansel Adams at 100; Portraits of the Hazelton Public Schools; American Sports, 1970: Or How We Spent the War in Vietnam; The American Century; and Crosstown. Completed projects include Lee Friedlander’s In the Picture: Self Portraits, 1958–2011 and The New Cars 1964; Maurice Sherif’s The American Wall; Robert Adams’s Sea Stories and This Day; Jules Allen’s Double Up; Simpson Kalisher’s The Alienated Photographer; Thomas Joshua Cooper’s Shoshone Falls; and James Krippner’s Paul Strand in Mexico. Mr. Palmer was appointed critic in photography in 2011.

Tod Papageorge Photographer. Mr. Papageorge began to photograph during his last semester at the University of New Hampshire, from which he graduated in 1962 with a B.A. in English literature. In 1970 he received the first of two Guggenheim fellowships in photography and, at about the same time, began his teaching career in New York City. He is the author of Public Relations: The Photographs of Garry Winogrand and Walker Evans and Robert Frank: An Essay on Influence, which were prepared in conjunction with exhibitions that he guest-curated for New York’s Museum of Modern Art in 1977 and the Yale University Art Gallery in 1981. In 2011 Aperture published Core Curriculum, a collection of his writings on photography. Mr. Papageorge’s work has been widely exhibited nationally and in Europe, and it is represented in more than thirty major public collections, including those of the New York and San Francisco Museums of Modern Art and the Art Institute of Chicago. It has also been published in three major monographs: Passing through Eden: Photographs of Central Park (Steidl, 2007), American Sports, 1970, or How We Spent the War in Vietnam (Aperture, 2008), and Opera Città (Punctum, 2010). In 2009 he was a resident in the visual arts at the American Academy in Rome and, the following year, held the Rome Commission. He was honored by the Lucie Foundation as the 2012 recipient of its award for documentary photography. In 1979, following one-year appointments at MIT and Harvard, Mr. Papageorge was appointed Walker Evans Professor of Photography at Yale, where he also served as director of graduate studies in photography until 2011.

Jack Pierson Photographer. Mr. Pierson received a B.F.A. in interrelated media from Massachusetts College of Art in 1984. As part of an exchange program, he spent one year at Cooper Union studying photography under Christine Osinski. He is a former fellow of the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, Massachusetts, as well as the Robert Rauschenberg Residency in Captiva, Florida. He began exhibiting work in 1990 at the Simon Watson Gallery in New York and since that time has exhibited his photographs as well as work in an extensive array of media in many galleries and museums throughout the world. His work has been included in three Whitney Biennials and has been the subject of two survey exhibitions, one curated by Bonnie Clearwater at the Museum of Contemporary Art North Miami and the other by Richard Marshall at the Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin. He has work in most major American museums, and he is represented by Cheim & Read, NY; Regen Projects, Los Angeles; Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Paris; and Galleria Christian Stein, Milan. He has been a visiting critic/artist at Cooper Union and New York University and was appointed critic in photography at Yale in 2012.

John Pilson Artist. Mr. Pilson received a B.A. in 1991 from Sarah Lawrence College, where he studied photography and philosophy, and an M.F.A. in photography in 1993 from Yale University. He has exhibited his work at P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center and at the Museum of Modern Art and recently mounted a solo exhibition at the Hamburger Kunsthalle in Germany. Mr. Pilson has been an artist-in-residence at the Harvestworks Digital Media Arts Center and the LMCC World Views Program. At the Venice Biennale in 2002 he was awarded one of four prizes given to artists in the International Exhibition. A grant from the Penny McCall Foundation made possible several projects, including St. Denis, which was shown in October 2003 at Nicole Klagsbrun (NYC). Mr. Pilson was appointed to the Yale faculty in 2001 and is currently a critic.

Richard Prince Artist. Mr. Prince attended Nasson College in Maine. His work has been the subject of major survey exhibitions at such institutions as the Whitney Museum of American Art (1992); San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (1993); Museum Boijmans van Beuningen, Rotterdam (1993); Museum für Gegenwartskunst, Basel (2001, traveled to Kunsthalle Zürich and Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg); and Serpentine Gallery, London (2008). The retrospective Richard Prince: Spiritual America opened at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in 2007 and traveled to the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, in 2008. Richard Prince: American Prayer, an exhibition of American literature and ephemera from the artist’s collection, was on view at the Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris, in 2011. He was appointed senior critic in photography in 2011.

Christopher Pullman Graphic designer. Mr. Pullman received a B.A. in history from Princeton University in 1963, enrolling the same year in the three-year graduate program in graphic design at Yale School of Art. Upon obtaining his M.F.A. in 1966, he began teaching in the design program at Yale, an affiliation he continues as senior critic. For several years he was a typographer and letterpress printer for Universal Limited Art Editions on Long Island, and from 1968 to 1972 he was a consultant designer for the office of George Nelson in New York City. During this period, he also served on the original design faculty of the State University of New York at Purchase. In 1973 Mr. Pullman joined public broadcasting station WGBH, Boston, where he served as vice president for design for thirty-five years. In 1986 WGBH received the Design Leadership Award from the American Institute of Graphic Arts. Mr. Pullman has lectured widely and published articles on design and television that have appeared in Communication Arts Magazine, Design Quarterly, Critique, and several anthologies. He has served on the board of the Design Management Institute and the Corporate Design Foundation, reflecting his interest in the relation between design and business. He has also been a member of the national board of the American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA) and the American Center for Design. In 2001 Mr. Pullman received the AIGA Gold Medal for his career as a designer and teacher. In 2008 he left WGBH while continuing to teach and to pursue his long personal interest in painting.

Michael Queenland Artist. Mr. Queenland received his B.A. in 1998 and his M.F.A. in 2002 from UCLA. He lives and works in New York City. In his sculptures and photographs he explores the legacies of radical social and political movements in the United States, often using everyday or ephemeral materials such as soap bubbles, brooms, and spider webs. His recent works relate minimal and conceptual art to the ethic and aesthetic of Shaker furniture. Mr. Queenland has had solo exhibitions at the Institute of Contemporary Art at the Maine College of Art and at the Massachusetts College of Art, Boston. His work has been included in many group shows, including Trace at the Whitney Museum of American Art at Altria and Frequency at the Studio Museum in Harlem, where he was artist in residence in 2005. Mr. Queenland joined the sculpture faculty in 2007 and was appointed assistant professor in 2010.

Robert J. Reed, Jr. Painter. Mr. Reed studied at Morgan State College, where he received a B.S. in 1958, and later at Yale School of Art, where he received a B.F.A. in 1960 and an M.F.A. in 1962. He attended the art division of the Yale Summer School of Music and Art in 1960. His work has been exhibited in America and in Europe and has been included in group exhibits at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, the Biennial of the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Hirshhorn Museum, the Walker Art Center, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, and the Yale University Art Gallery. His solo exhibits include the Whitney Museum of American Art; the Bayly Museum in Charlottesville, Virginia; the Washburn Gallery in New York; and the McIntosh Gallery in Atlanta. His work is included in the permanent collections of the Hirshhorn Museum, the Walker Art Center, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Yale University Art Gallery, and the Bayly Museum. Mr. Reed has lectured extensively in this country and has taught at Skidmore College and the Minneapolis College of Art and Design, where he was head of the Foundation Studies Division in 1964. He is the author of several intensive studio programs, and is the founder and director of the Institute for Studio Studies in Auvillar, France, which is associated with Yale Summer Session. From 1970 to 1974 he directed the art division of the Yale Summer School of Music and Art. He has had several appointments as director of undergraduate studies in art at Yale since 1969 and has also served as director of graduate studies in painting. He has been a Yaddo Fellow and a board member for the McDowell Colony and the Virginia Center for Creative Arts. In 1980 he was awarded a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. In 2000 he received the national award from the National Council of Art Administrators, and in 2001 he received an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degree from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design. In 2004 Mr. Reed received the Distinguished Teaching of Art award from the College Art Association, in 2009 he was elected to the National Academy Fellowship in New York, and in 2014 he received the William Clyde DeVane Medal for distinguished teaching and scholarship in Yale College. His work is represented by David Findlay Jr. Fine Art in New York. He was appointed to the faculty in 1969 and is professor of painting/printmaking.

Melinda Ring Performance Artist. Ms. Ring received a B.A. in dance from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1982 and an M.F.A. from Bennington College in 2001. Her work explores a very liberal definition of choreography, comprising dances, performance pieces, videos, and installations. She founded the performance company Special Projects in 2004. Recently, Ms. Ring’s work has been commissioned and presented by Headlands Center for the Arts, Danspace Project, the Kitchen, MASS MoCA, the Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College, the Whitney Biennial, Mount Tremper Arts, and the Santa Monica Museum of Art. In 2012–13 she was an artist-in-residence at Headlands Center for the Arts, Gibney Dance Center, and the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council’s Swing Space. She was the curator for Danspace Project’s spring 2011 Platform, Susan Rethorst: Retro(intro)spective, and its fall 2012 Judson Now Platform program, Dance by Default. As a performer she has worked for artist Paul McCarthy on numerous projects, beginning in 1997 with Santa Chocolate Shop and continuing to the present. Ms. Ring’s current project, Forgetful Snow, a triptych comprised of two durational performances and an evening-length dance, will be shown at the Kitchen, New York, in May 2014 and the Box, Los Angeles, in July 2014. She was appointed critic in sculpture at Yale in 2014.

Michael Rock Graphic designer. Mr. Rock received a B.A. in humanities from Union College in 1981 and an M.F.A. in graphic design from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1983. From 1984 to 1991 he served on the graphic design faculty at the Rhode Island School of Design. He is currently a partner in the graphic design studio 2x4. His articles and essays on design and visual culture appear in magazines and journals internationally. In 1999 he received the Rome Prize in design from the American Academy in Rome. 2x4 was the subject of a solo exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art in 2005 and the recipient of the 2006 National Design Award. A selection of 2x4’s work was on display at the Architecture and Design Gallery at the Museum of Modern Art in New York throughout 2008. Mr. Rock was appointed to the graphic design faculty in 1991 and currently holds the rank of professor (adjunct).

Michael Roemer Filmmaker. Mr. Roemer, born in Germany, received his B.A. in 1949 from Harvard University, where he wrote and directed the first feature film produced at an American college. He has since worked on films with Robert Young, and he produced, directed, and wrote a series of twelve films for the Ford Foundation. With a Guggenheim Fellowship, he wrote Stone My Heart. His film Nothing but a Man was shown at the London and New York film festivals and was a double prize winner at the Venice Film Festival. Other films include Pilgrim Farewell and Dying, the latter having been nominated by the Television Critics Circle as the best documentary film of 1976. His film Vengeance Is Mine premiered at the Berlin Film Festival in 1984. His 1970 film The Plot Against Harry was shown at the 1989 New York, Cannes, and Toronto film festivals and opened in theaters in 1990. He has published a book on plot, Telling Stories, and two volumes of his screenplays, Film Stories. Mr. Roemer has taught film theory and practice at Yale School of Drama and is currently professor (adjunct) of American studies and of film at Yale School of Art.

Collier Schorr Photographer. Ms. Schorr received a B.F.A. from the School of Visual Arts in 1985. She has exhibited widely in the United States and Europe and is represented by 303 Gallery in New York and Modern Art in London. Ms. Schorr’s work is represented in many public collections including the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Jewish Museum, and the Walker Art Center. Her commercial photography is represented by Art+Commerce. Currently, she is the editor-at-large for the British art magazine Frieze, and she has been a contributor to Artforum and Parkett. Her essays have also appeared in catalogs for the Guggenheim Museum and the Boston ICA. She has taught at Columbia University, the School of Visual Arts, and Sarah Lawrence College. Ms. Schorr was appointed to the Yale faculty in 2003 and is currently senior critic in photography.

Douglass Scott Graphic designer. Mr. Scott received a B.Arch. from the University of Nebraska in 1971 and an M.F.A. in graphic design from Yale University in 1974. He is a design director at the WGBH public broadcasting station in Boston, a freelance book and exhibition designer, art director of educational publisher Davis Publications, and a collage artist. Mr. Scott is on the faculty of the Rhode Island School of Design, has taught at Harvard University, Maine College of Art, and the Boston Architectural Center, and has been a visiting instructor/critic at a number of schools. He was curator of the 1987 Boston exhibition The Roots of Modern American Graphic Design and a curator of the history of American typography section of the exhibition Graphic Design in America, organized by the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis in 1989. Since 1978 he has given more than 140 lectures on the history of design and typography at various schools, museums, and symposia. Mr. Scott was appointed visiting lecturer in graphic design in 1984 and is currently senior critic in graphic design.

Susan Sellers Graphic designer. Ms. Sellers received a B.F.A. in graphic design from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1989. She went on to earn an M.A. in American Studies from Yale University, where her work explored mid-nineteenth-century labor practices in craft industries of printing and typesetting and the emergence of professionalized design practices. She has taught and lectured widely, and her articles have appeared in a number of journals including Eye, Design Issues, and Visible Language. She has held positions in several studios including Total Design and UNA in Amsterdam. Ms. Sellers is a founding partner at the design studio 2x4 in New York City. She was appointed to the faculty in 1997 and is currently senior critic in graphic design.

Laurie Simmons Artist. Ms. Simmons received a B.F.A. in 1971 from Tyler School of Art. Since the mid-1970s, she has staged scenes for her camera with dolls, ventriloquist dummies, mannequins, and occasionally people, to create images with intensely psychological subtexts. Her photographic-based works are collected by many museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Guggenheim, as well as the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, the Walker Art Center, and the Hara Museum in Tokyo. In 2006 she produced and directed her first film, The Music of Regret, starring Meryl Streep, Adam Guettel, and the Alvin Ailey II dancers with cinematography by Edward Lachman. The film premiered at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and has been screened at many international museums and film festivals, including the Whitney Museum. Ms. Simmons was featured in season four of the PBS series Art 21: Art in the Twenty-First Century. Her most recent exhibitions were at Salon 94 Bowery in New York; with Wilkinson Gallery at Art Basel and in London; at Baldwin Gallery in Aspen; and at the Gothenburg Museum of Art in Sweden. She had a solo show at the Tomio Koyama Gallery in Tokyo in 2013 and has a forthcoming book titled “The Love Doll.” Ms. Simmons lives and works in New York City and Cornwall, Connecticut, with her husband, the painter Carroll Dunham. She was appointed critic in photography in 2012.

Taryn Simon Photographer. Ms. Simon received a B.A. in art semiotics in 1997 from Brown University. Her photographs have been exhibited nationally and internationally, including solo shows at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Museum für Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt; P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center, New York; High Museum of Art, Atlanta; and Kunst-Werke Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin. Her work is represented in many public collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art; Tate Modern; Whitney Museum of American Art; Centre Pompidou; Museum für Moderne Kunst; the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego; and High Museum of Art. Ms. Simon has been a visiting artist at Bard College, Harvard University, Columbia University, and the School of Visual Arts. Her books include The Innocents and, most recently, An American Index of the Hidden and Unfamiliar (Steidl, 2008). Her photography and writing have been featured in numerous publications and broadcasts, including The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, CNN, BBC, Frontline, and NPR. She received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2001 and is represented by Gagosian Gallery. Ms. Simon was appointed critic in photography in 2009 and again in 2012.

Elizabeth Sledge Editor. Ms. Sledge received an M.A. from the University of North Carolina in 1969 and a C.A.S. from Wesleyan University in 1995. Since 1979 she has served as a writing tutor for undergraduates in Yale College, and since 2007 she has tutored for Directed Studies. Ms. Sledge has taught writing as a member of the Yale English department and in Yale’s summer programs. She was appointed to the design faculty in 1985 to assist second-year graphic design students with thesis development and writing.

Nancy Spector Curator. Ms. Spector received a B.A. from Sarah Lawrence College in 1981, an M.A. in art history from Williams College in 1984, and an M.Phil. in art history from City University of New York in 1997. She is deputy director and chief curator of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, where she has organized exhibitions on conceptual photography, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Matthew Barney’s Cremaster cycle, Richard Prince, Louise Bourgeois, Marina Abramovi´c, and Tino Sehgal. She also organized the group exhibitions Moving Pictures; Singular Forms (Sometimes Repeated); and theanyspacewhatever. She was one of the curators of Monument to Now, an exhibition of the Dakis Joannou Collection, which premiered in Athens as part of the Olympics program. She was adjunct curator of the 1997 Venice Biennale and co-organizer of the first Berlin Biennial in 1998. Under the auspices of the Deutsche Guggenheim Berlin, she has initiated special commissions by Andreas Slominski, Hiroshi Sugimoto, and Lawrence Weiner as well as a special exhibition on the work of Joseph Beuys and Matthew Barney. She has contributed to numerous books on contemporary visual culture with essays on artists such as Maurizio Cattelan, Luc Tuymans, Douglas Gordon, Tino Sehgal, and Anna Gaskell. In 2007 she was the U.S. commissioner for the Venice Biennale, where she presented an exhibition of work by Felix Gonzalez-Torres. Ms. Spector is a recipient of the Peter Norton Family Foundation Curator’s Grant and five International Art Critics Association awards. She has been teaching at Yale intermittently since 1994 and is currently a critic in photography.

William Storandt Editor. Mr. Storandt received a B.M. from the Juilliard School of Music in 1968. He pursued a freelance career as a percussionist, ranging from xylophone at Radio City Music Hall to tambourine for the Monkees to timpani in the Vermont Symphony, before sidling into writing accounts of his travels for Cruising World, a national sailing magazine. He wrote film treatments for Yale Films, a producer of documentaries, and has been tutoring Yale undergraduates in the Bass Writing Program since 1996. His memoir of a trans-Atlantic voyage, Outbound: Finding a Man, Sailing an Ocean, was published by the University of Wisconsin Press in 2001, and his novel, The Summer They Came, was published by Villard/Random House in 2002. He was appointed to the design faculty in 2005 to assist second-year graphic design students with thesis development and writing.

Robert Storr Artist, critic, and curator. Mr. Storr received a B.A. from Swarthmore College in 1972 and an M.F.A. from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1978. He was curator and then senior curator in the Department of Painting and Sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, from 1990 to 2002, where he organized thematic exhibitions such as Dislocations and Modern Art Despite Modernism as well as mongraphic shows on Elizabeth Murray, Gerhard Richter, Max Beckmann, Tony Smith, and Robert Ryman. In addition, he coordinated the Projects series from 1990 to 2000, mounting exhibitions with Art Spiegelman, Ann Hamilton, and Franz West, among others. In 2002 he was named the first Rosalie Solow Professor of Modern Art at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. Mr. Storr has also taught at the CUNY graduate center and the Bard Center for Curatorial Studies as well as the Rhode Island School of Design, Tyler School of Art, New York Studio School, and Harvard University, and has been a frequent lecturer in this country and abroad. He has been a contributing editor at Art in America since 1981 and writes frequently for Artforum, Parkett, Art Press (Paris), Frieze (London), and Corriere della Serra (Milan). He has also written numerous catalogs, articles, and books, including Philip Guston (Abbeville, 1986), Chuck Close (with Lisa Lyons, Rizzoli, 1987), and the forthcoming “Intimate Geometries: The Work and Life of Louise Bourgeois.” Among his many honors he has received a Penny McCall Foundation Grant for painting, a Norton Family Foundation Curator Grant, and honorary doctorates from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the Maine College of Art, as well as awards from the American Chapter of the International Association of Art Critics, a special AICA award for Distinguished Contribution to the Field of Art Criticism, an ICI Agnes Gund Curatorial Award, and the Lawrence A. Fleischman Award for Scholarly Excellence in the Field of American Art History from the Smithsonian Institution’s Archives of American Art. In 2000 the French Ministry of Culture presented him with the medal of Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres and subsequently awarded him the status of Officier in the same order. From 2005 to 2007 he was visual arts director of the Venice Biennale, the first American invited to assume that position. Mr. Storr was appointed professor of painting/printmaking and dean of the School of Art in 2006 and was named the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Dean in 2014.

Scott Stowell Graphic designer. Mr. Stowell received a B.F.A. in graphic design from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1990. He is the proprietor of Open, an independent design studio that creates rewarding experiences for people who look, read, and think. Open projects include the visual identity for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society; the editorial design of Good magazine; redesigns of the television networks Bravo, Nick at Nite, and Trio; and signage systems for the Brown University Friedman Study Center and the Yale University Art Gallery. Previously he was a senior designer at M&Co and art director of Benetton’s Colors magazine in Rome. His work has been recognized by the American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA), the Art Directors Club of New York, the Association for Independent Music, Critique, Communication Arts, I.D., Print, the Society of Publication Designers, STEP Inside Design, the Tokyo Typedirectors Club, and the Utne Reader Alternative Press Awards. A former vice president of the New York chapter of the AIGA, he has also taught at Purchase College and the School of Visual Arts. Mr. Stowell was appointed to the Yale faculty in 2000 and is currently critic in graphic design.

Ka-Man Tse Photographer. Ms. Tse is a New York-based photographer and video artist. She received a B.A. from Bard College in 2003 and an M.F.A. from Yale University in 2009. She has exhibited at the Museum of Chinese in America (New York City), the Bronx Museum of the Arts, Cornell University, the Philadelphia Photo Arts Center, Gallery 339 in Philadelphia, and the Eighth Veil in Los Angeles, and her work has been published in Capricious. In 2012 she was a SPARC Artist-in-Residence through the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs. Ms. Tse was appointed lecturer in photography at Yale in 2013.

Masamichi Udagawa Graphic designer. Mr. Udagawa is a partner at Antenna Design New York Inc., which he co-founded with Sigi Moeslinger in 1997. Antenna’s design projects range from public and commercial to experimental and artistic, typically spanning object, interface, and environment. Among Antenna’s best-known projects are the design of New York City subway cars and ticket vending machines, JetBlue check-in kiosks, Bloomberg displays, and interactive environments, such as Power Flower, an installation in the windows of Bloomingdale’s activated by passersby. Antenna’s user-centered design approach helps understand human behavior, which is particularly important when designing the unfamiliar, elicited by new technology. Antenna’s work has won numerous awards, including recognition from Business Week/IDSA, I.D., Fast Company, and Wired magazines. In 2006 Mr. Udagawa and Ms. Moeslinger were named United States Artists Target Fellows in the Architecture and Design category. In 2008 Antenna won the National Design Award in Product Design from the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum. Before forming Antenna, Mr. Udagawa ran a New York satellite studio of IDEO Product Development. Prior to that, he was a senior designer at Apple Computer Industrial Design Group in Cupertino, California, where he designed a number of products such as the PowerBook 5300/3400 series. Before that, he worked at Emilio Ambasz Design Group in New York. Before coming to the United States, Mr. Udagawa worked at the Yamaha Product Design Laboratory in Japan, where he designed electronic musical instruments, including the award-winning YS200 synthesizer. He holds a master’s degree in industrial design from Cranbrook Academy of Art and a B.E. in industrial design from Chiba University in Japan. He joined the Yale faculty in 2005 and is currently senior critic in graphic design.

Henk van Assen Graphic designer. Mr. van Assen graduated from the Royal Academy of Fine Arts (Department of Graphic Design and Typography) in The Hague, The Netherlands, in 1989. After working several years as a graphic designer in Amsterdam, he came to the United States, where he received his M.F.A. in 1993 from Yale University. Mr. van Assen has since worked on many projects in print, environmental, and screen-based media, ranging from book design to identity programs to Web design and signage systems. Clients include Abrams, New York; Rizzoli, New York; Malba, Buenos Aires; the GeGo Foundation, Caracas; the Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Museum of the City of New York; the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; FotoFest, Houston; the New York Public Library; and the Museum of Arts and Design, New York. He coauthored, with Daniel M. Olsen, Ranch Gates of the Southwest (Trinity Press, 2009). He has taught design at the College of Fine Arts at the University of Texas, at the School of Visual Arts in New York, and at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia. Additionally, he has lectured internationally, most recently in Mexico, China, and Canada. He was awarded the 1999, 2000, 2004, and 2005 AIGA 50 Best Books award, the 2000 and 2002 AAUP Best Book award, and the 2005 New York Book Show award. Currently, he is a principal of HvAD, a design studio in New York City. Mr. van Assen was appointed lecturer in graphic design in 1999 and is currently critic in graphic design.

Linda van Deursen Graphic designer. Ms. van Deursen lives and works in Amsterdam, where she and Armand Mevis began their collaboration after graduating from the Gerrit Rietveld Academy in 1986. They have been influential in the development of contemporary Dutch design and are known for their intelligent and innovative work for cultural clients, producing the new identity of Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam, the identity and publications for fashion duo Viktor & Rolf, and numerous books on architecture and design. They also have worked on several Dutch cultural publications, including Metropolis M, and won the competition for the graphic identity for the City of Rotterdam as a designated Cultural Capital of Europe. Their work has been shown in museums and educational institutions throughout the world. Their long and prolific collaboration has been documented in the book Recollected Work: Mevis & Van Deursen, published by Artimo in 2005. Ms. van Deursen serves as head of the graphic design department at the Gerrit Rietveld Academy. She was appointed critic in graphic design in 2005.

Sara VanDerBeek Photographer. Ms. VanDerBeek received a B.F.A. from Cooper Union in 1998. Her work has been presented in solo exhibitions at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Fondazione Memmo, Rome; the Approach, London; and Metro Pictures, New York. Her work has also been included in numerous thematic exhibitions, including Amazement Park: Stan, Sara and Johannes VanDerBeek at the Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College; Haunted: Contemporary Photography/Video/Performance at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; New Photography 2009 at the Museum of Modern Art, New York; and Knight’s Move at the SculptureCenter, New York. Ms. VanDerBeek was appointed critic in photography in 2013.

William Villalongo Painter. Mr. Villalongo is a Brooklyn-based artist born in Hollywood, Florida, and raised in the town of Bridgeton, New Jersey. He received a B.F.A. in 1999 from Cooper Union and an M.F.A. in painting in 2001 from Tyler School of Art. Mr. Villalongo’s work was first introduced to the public through his residency at the Studio Museum in Harlem in 2004 and P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center’s Greater New York 2005 exhibition. His work has also been exhibited in the Studio Museum in Harlem’s Frequency exhibition in 2005 and El Museo del Barrio’s fifth biennial, The (S) Files 2007. He is a recipient of both a Louis Comfort Tiffany Award and a Joan Mitchell Foundation Grant. His work is included in several notable collections including the Studio Museum in Harlem, El Museo del Barrio, and Princeton University Art Museum. Mr. Villalongo was appointed lecturer in painting/printmaking in 2010.

Robert Wiesenberger Art historian. Mr. Wiesenberger is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University, focused on twentieth-century architecture, design, and media. Together with David Reinfurt he organized an exhibition on the graphic designer Muriel Cooper, which opened at Columbia’s Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery in February 2014. He received a B.A. in history and Germanic studies in 2007 from the University of Chicago. Mr. Wiesenberger has also worked at MetaDesign, Ammunition, and the Museum of Modern Art. He was appointed critic in graphic design at Yale in 2013.

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