South Asia at Yale
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COURSES

Fall 2013 | Spring 2014 | Language Courses

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Fall 2013

ANTH276/SAST 219
South Asian Social Worlds
Sara Shneiderman
Study of a series of texts that introduce anthropological and critical approaches to South Asia's peoples and cultures while questioning the historical and political possibility of understanding such a diverse region.

ENGL 343/ER&M 353/HUMS 419/LITR 268/SAST 371
Postcolonial Studies

Shital Pravinchandra
Introduction to key writers, literary works, concepts, and issues in the field of postcolonial studies. Definitions of the term "postcolonial," including to whom it can be applied; the cultural, psychological, and political consequences of colonization; opinions of non-Western writers about current cultural and political climates and the historical processes that shaped them.

HIST 310/SAST 221
History of Modern South Asia

Asiya Alam
Survey of the Indian subcontinent's history from colonial rule, through nationalist resistance, to postcolonial history. The establishment of British dominion; colonial transformation of Indian politics, society, economy, and culture; nationalism before and after Gandhi; the partition of India; and recent developments in South Asia.

HSAR 142/RLST 187/SAST 265
Introduction to the History of Art: The Classical Buddhist World

Mimi Yiengpruksawan
Buddhist art and architecture of India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and central Asia from earliest beginnings to the tenth century, and including Greco-Roman, Persian, and Islamic contact.

HSAR 381/SAST 264
Introduction to Islamic Art

Kishwar Rizvi
This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of Islamic art, starting from the 7th century to the present. Despite orthodox polemics against figural representation, patrons and artists have celebrated the rich artistic practices that have given rise to the diverse cultures of the Islamic world – and continue to do so. Works studied include manuscript painting and portraiture, as well as the arts of calligraphy and ceramics, from the Middle East, North Africa and South Asia. The class is supplemented by visits to the Yale University Art Gallery and the new Islamic Art galleries of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

HSAR 477/RLST 382/SAST 462
Yoga in Art, Text, and Practice

Tamara Sears and Andrew Quintman
Critical investigation of texts, images, and the practice of yoga, focusing on Indian traditions of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism, as well as modern manifestations in the West. Themes include contemplative practices, bodily disciplines, ritual, narrative painting, architecture, and the role of yoga in tantra. Readings emphasize primary sources and theoretical frameworks.

HUM418/RLST130/SAST367
Traditional Literature: Indian, China and Japan

Phyllis Granoff and Koichi Shinohara
Introduction to literary works that shaped the great civilizations of Asia. Focus on traditional literature from India, China, and Japan. Readings range from religious and philosophical texts to literature of the court, poetry, drama, and epics.

RLST 105/SAST 175
Religious Movements: Modern India

Vasudha Dalmia
Sacred texts and religious practices of India as they have been disseminated, reinterpreted, and enlisted in various political and cultural projects during the colonial and postindependence periods. Focus on Hindu traditions, with some attention to Christianity, Buddhism, and Islam. Readings include theological writings, doctrinal tracts, novels, anthropological and sociological analyses, poetry, autobiography, and historical overviews.

RLST 125/SAST 267
Introduction to Buddhist Thought and Practice

Andrew Quintman
Significant aspects of Buddhism as practiced mainly in India and South Asia, including philosophy and ethics, monastic and ascetic life, meditation and ritual practices, and the material culture of Buddhist societies. The Mahayana tradition that emerged in the first century B.C.E.; later forms of esoteric Buddhism known as tantra; the development of modern Buddhism in Asia and its manifestation in the West. Readings from Buddhist texts in translation.

SAST 271/HIST 309
History of Ancient India

David Brick
Introduction to Indian society and civilization from its earliest beginnings until c. 1000 C.E. Topics include politics, caste and class, commerce, religion, art and architecture, literature, and science.

SAST 335
Migration in the Indian Ocean Basin

Rajashree Mazumder
Continuity and change in the Indian Ocean basin from the emergence of Islam in the seventh century C.E. to the intrusion of European powers and the subsequent emergence of the global economy and colonialism in the nineteenth century. Focus on the experiences of people whose lives were shaped by transoceanic networks, including merchants, itinerant pilgrims, soldiers, sailors, pirates, sex workers, and wage laborers.

SAST 363/ANTH 317/EAST 363/HSAR 479
Himalayan Collections at Yale

Mark Turin
Online tools and new digital media are used to explore links between four library and museum collections at Yale that are from and about the Himalayan region: Bubriski's black-and-white photographs of Nepal; Buddhist scrolls and fabric temple banners; Christian missionary archives; documents on the political history of Nepal. Collective cataloguing of materials in the collections.

SAST 463/THST 391
Indian Theater: 1850 to Present

Kedar Kulkarni
Introduction to major movements and playwrights in modern Indian theater. Focus on post-independence drama and its forms that derive from classical Indian, folk, and other sources, both indigenous and foreign.

SAST 486
Directed Study
(Fall & Spring)
Sara Shneiderman
A one-credit, single-term course on topics not covered in regular offerings. To apply for admission, a student should present a course description and syllabus to the director of undergraduate studies, along with written approval from the faculty member who will direct the study.

SAST 491
Senior Essay

Sara Shneiderman
A year long research project completed under faculty supervision and resulting in a substantial paper.

WGSS 328/ER&M 328/SAST 458
Popular Culture & Postcolonial India

Geetanjali Singh Chanda
A study of films and literature of South Asians living, working, and directing in Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Questions of commercial populism, authenticity, and postcolonial identity.

LING 248/SAST 379
Indo-Aryan Languages

Ashwini Deo
Th 2.30-4.30
Introduction to the Indo-Aryan language family, its linguistic context, and its evolution from the ancient period to the present. Focus on comparative morphosyntax and semantic phenomena, with some attention to issues of classification and contact.

Spring 2014

ANTH 313/SAST 313
Cultural Aspects of International Development

Sara Shneiderman
Critical analysis of development ideas and projects in Asia, Africa, and Latin America, with a focus on ethnographic research. Development and cultural diversity; social and economic development politics and practices; institutions that design, fund, and implement development, such as multilateral agencies, governments, and civil society organizations.

ENGL 347/HUMS 274/LITR 264/SAST 362
South Asian Anglophone Lit

Shital Pravinchandra
Introduction to key works, concepts, and issues in twentieth-century South Asian writing in English. Focus on literature from and about India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Bangladesh. The status of English on the Indian subcontinent; the current popularity of South Asian Anglophone literature; the relation of South Asian literature written in English to literature written in other South Asian languages.

PLSC181/EP&E 425/SAST 342
South Asia in World Politics

Elizabeth Hanson
Relations of the countries of South Asia - Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Pakistan, Nepal, and Sri Lanka - with each other and with the rest of the world. Broad issues of world politics, including problems of development and security that confront developing countries.

FILM 317/SAST 310
Understanding Bollywood

Kedar Kulkarni
Critical introduction to popular cinema of South Asia, its history, culture, and politics. Topics include nationalism, partition, gender, secularism, development, globalization, and diaspora.

HIST 352/SAST 223/WGSS 330
Reinventing Gender in Modern India

Asiya Alam
A study of changing gender norms and practices in India in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Widow immolation and remarriage, child marriage and the age of consent, arranged vs. love-based marriages, education and domestic roles, religious life, sex workers, female labor in mills and in agriculture, caste and tribes, gender behavior in political life.

HSAR 143/RLST 188/SAST 260
Buddhist Art and Architecture – 900 to1600

Mimi Yiengpruksawan
Buddhist art and architecture of East Asia, Southeast Asia, and Tibet from the tenth century to the early modern period. Emphasis on cross-regional engagements including the impact of Islam.

HSAR 383A/ SAST 256A
The Art of India, c. 300 BC-1650 AD

Tamara L. Sears
Description: Introduction to the art and architectural history of the Indian subcontinent between c. 300 BC and 1650 AD. The course traces the development of early Buddhist and Jain art, the development of Hindu temples and icons, and the efflorescence of Islamic visual culture under the Mughal Empire.

SAST 259b/MUSI 357
Indian Music Theory and Practice: From Slumdog Millionaire to Ravi Shankar

Stan Scott
In this course students will engage in both discussion about and practice in Indian music. Topics for discussion will include: history and theory of Indian music, improvisation, modern trends, gender, Bollywood, musical fusions, interactions between Indian and Western music cultures. Practical instruction will focus on Hindustani classical traditions. No previous experience in Indian classical music is necessary.

PLSC461/SAST242
India and Pakistan: Democracy, Conflict and Development

Steven Wilkinson
This course introduces students to the important countries of India and Pakistan, and also offers an opportunity to explore the issue of why these two countries, which emerged from the same state in 1947, have had such different experiences since then, in terms of their success with democracy, in moderating ethnic and religious conflicts, and in their levels of stability and economic development.

RLST 013/EAST 013/SAST 056
The Dalai Lama

Andrew Quintman
The institution of the Dalai Lama and the individuals who have filled that role from fifteenth-century Tibet to twenty-first-century exile in India. Survey of the most important Dalai Lamas; regional histories of Buddhism; the Tibetan tradition of recognized reincarnations and the Buddhist philosophical principles that support it; activities of the current Dalai Lama as interpreted by Chinese government media, Indian exile communities, and the modern West.

RLST 190/HUMS 449/SAST 466
Narrative Space in Asian Religions

Phyllis Granoff and Koichi Shinohara
The many spaces of Asian religious practice, good and bad, real and imaginary, explored through readings from Indian, Chinese, and Japanese texts in translation.

RLST 383/SAST 467
Biography in Asian Religions

Andrew Quintman
The significance of life writing in the religious traditions of Asia. Readings both from primary texts in translation and from theoretical works on biography and autobiography.

ANTH 353/SAST 369
Himalayan Languages & Cultures

Mark Turin
Exploration of social, linguistic and political aspects of the Himalayan region. Issues include classifications of communities and their languages; census taking and other state enumeration projects; the crisis of endangered oral cultures and speech forms; the creation and adoption of writing systems and the challenges of developing mother tongue literacy materials. Case studies are drawn from Bhutan, northern India, Nepal and Tibet.

SAST 492
Senior Essay

Sara Shneiderman
A yearlong research project completed under faculty supervision and resulting in a substantial paper.

Language Courses

BNGL 110
Introductory Bengali I
(Fall)
Sreemati Mukherjee
TTh 11.40-12.55
A comprehensive approach to learning all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. At the completion of the two-term sequence students are able to read and write in Bengali, and to converse in formal and informal situations.
Course taught through distance learning using videoconferencing technology from Cornell University. Credit only on completion of BNGL 120.

BNGL 120
Introductory Bengali II
(Spring)
Sreemati Mukherjee
HTBA
Continuation of BNGL 120. Course taught through distance learning using videoconferencing technology from Cornell University.

HNDI 110/HNDI 510
Elementary Hindi I
(Fall)
Seema Khurana, Swapna Sharma
M-F 10.30-11.20
An in-depth introduction to modern Hindi, including the Devanagari script. A combination of graded texts, written assignments, audiovisual material, and computer-based exercises provides cultural insights and increases proficiency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Hindi. Emphasis on spontaneous self-expression in the language. No prior background in Hindi assumed. Credit only on completion of HNDI 120.

HNDI 120/HNDI 520
Elementary Hindi II
(Spring)
Seema Khurana, Swapna Sharma
M-F 10.30-11.20
Continuation of Hindi 110. After Hindi 110 or equivalent.

HNDI 130/HNDI 530
Intermediate Hindi I
(Fall)
Seema Khurana, Swapna Sharma
MWF 11.35-12.25
TTh 9.25-10.15
The first half of a two-term sequence designed to develop proficiency in the four language skills. Extensive use of cultural documents including feature films, radio broadcasts, and literary and nonliterary texts to increase proficiency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Hindi. Focus on cultural nuances and Hindi literary traditions. Emphasis on spontaneous self-expression in the language. After HNDI 120 or equivalent.

HNDI140/HNDI540
Intermediate Hindi II
(Spring)
Seema Khurana, Swapna Sharma
MWF 11.35-12.25
TTh 11.35-12.25
Continuation of HNDI 130. After HNDI 130 or equivalent.

HNDI132/HNDI532
Accelerated Hindi I
(Fall)
Swapna Sharma
TTh 4.00-5.15
A fast-paced course designed for students who are able to understand basic conversational Hindi but who have minimal or no literacy skills. Introduction to the Devanagari script; development of listening and speaking skills; vocabulary enrichment; attention to sociocultural rules that affect language use. Students learn to read simple texts and to converse on a variety of everyday personal and social topics.

HNDI 142/HNDI 542
Accelerated Hindi II
(Spring)
Swapna Sharma
TTh 4.00-5.15
Continuation of HNDI 132. Development of increased proficiency in the four language skills. Focus on reading and higher language functions such as narration, description, and comparison. Reading strategies for parsing paragraph-length sentences in Hindi newspapers. Discussion of political, social, and cultural dimensions of Hindi culture as well as contemporary global issues.

HNDI 150/HNDI550
Advanced Hindi
(Fall)
Seema Khurana
TTh 4.00-5.15
An advanced language course aimed at enabling students to engage in fluent discourse in Hindi and to achieve a comprehensive knowledge of formal grammar. Introduction to a variety of styles and levels of discourse and usage. Emphasis on the written language, with readings on general topics from newspapers, books, and magazines.

HNDI 198/HNDI 598
Advanced Tutorial
(Fall & Spring)
Seema Khurana, Swapna Sharma
HTBA
For students with advanced Hindi language skills who wish to engage in concentrated reading and research on material not otherwise offered by the department. Work must be supervised by an adviser and must terminate in a term paper or the equivalent. Permission to enroll requires submission of a detailed project proposal and its approval by the language studies coordinator.
Prerequisite: HNDI 150 or equivalent.

LING 115/LING 515/SKRT 110/SKRT 51
Introductory Sanskrit I
(Fall)
David Brick
M-F 9.25-10.15
An introduction to Sanskrit language and grammar. Focus on learning to read and translate basic Sanskrit sentences in Devanagari script. No prior background in Sanskrit assumed.

LING 125/SKRT 120/LING 525/SKRT 520
Introductory Sanskrit II
(Spring)
David Brick
MWF 10.30-11.20
TTh 9.25-10.15
Continuation of SKRT 110. Focus on the basics of Sanskrit grammar; readings from classical Sanskrit texts written in Devanagari script. After SKRT 110.

LING 138/LING 538/SKRT 530/SKRT 130
Intermediate Sanskrit I
(Fall)
David Brick
M-F 11.35-12.25
The first half of a two-term sequence aimed at helping students develop the skills necessary to read texts written in Sanskrit. Readings include selections from the Hitopadesa, Kathasaritsagara, Mahabharata, and Bhagavadgita. After SKRT 120 or equivalent.

LING 148/LING 548/SKRT 140/SKRT 540
Intermediate Sanskrit II
(Spring)
David Brick
M-F 11.35-12.25
Continuation of SKRT 130, focusing on Sanskrit literature from the kavya genre. Readings include selections from the Jatakamala of Aryasura and the opening verses of Kalidasa's Kumarasambhava. After SKRT 130 or equivalent.

SKRT 150
Advanced Sanskrit Dharmasastra
(Fall)
David Brick
MW 1.00-2.15
Introduction to Sanskrit commentarial literature, particularly to Dharmasastra, an explication and analysis of dharma (law or duty). Discussion of normative rules of human behavior; historical traditions of writing on the Indian subcontinent. Prerequisite: SKRT 140 or equivalent.

LING 248/SAST 379
Indo-Aryan Languages
(Fall)
Ashwini Deo
Th 2.30-4.30
Introduction to the Indo-Aryan language family, its linguistic context, and its evolution from the ancient period to the present. Focus on comparative morphosyntax and semantic phenomena, with some attention to issues of classification and contact.

TAML 110
Introductory Tamil I
(Fall)
Staff
M-F 10.30-11.20
An in-depth introduction to modern Tamil, focusing on comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills as well as on cultural understanding. Course work includes graded texts, written assignments, audiovisual material, and computer-based exercises. No prior background in Tamil assumed. Credit only on completion of TAML 120b.

TAML 120
Introductory Tamil II

Staff
M-F 10.30-11.20
Continuation of TAML 110. After TAML 110.

TAML 130
Intermediate Tamil I

Staff
HTBA
The first half of a two-term sequence designed to develop proficiency in comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing through the use of visual media, newspapers and magazines, modern fiction and poetry, and public communications such as pamphlets, advertisements, and government announcements. Prerequisite: TAML 120 or equivalent.

TAML 140
Intermediate Tamil II

D. Sudanandha
MW 11.35-12.50
Continuation of TAML 130a, focusing on further development of proficiency in the four language skill areas. Prepares students to conduct fieldwork in Tamil. Prerequisite: TAML 130 or equivalent.