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Faculty

Core Faculty | Affiliate Faculty | Emeritus Faculty

Core Faculty

Adel Allouche
Abbas Amanat
Gerhard Böwering
Karla Britton
John C. Darnell
Stephen Davis
Narges Erami
Karen Polinger Foster
Steven Fraade
Eckart Frahm
Zareena Grewal
Frank Griffel
Beatrice Gruendler
Dimitri Gutas
Christine Hayes
Marcia C. Inhorn
Kaveh Khoshnood
Tolga Köker
Anthony Kronman
Adria Lawrence
Mark Lazenby
Bentley Layton
Ellen Lust
Colleen Manassa
Joseph Manning
Andrew F. March
Ivan Marcus
Alan Mikhail
Mushfiq Mobarak
Robert S. Nelson
Kishwar Rizvi
Lamin Sanneh
Kathryn Slanski
Harvey Weiss
Jonathan Wyrtzen
     

 

American Studies

grewalZareena A Grewal is an Assistant Professor of American Studies and Religious Studies. She is a historical anthropologist and documentary filmmaker and has directed and produced a film about the scrutiny of American Muslims’ patriotism (By the Dawn’s Early Light: Chris Jackson’s Journey to Islam (2004)) featured on the Documentary Channel. She also writes on the intersections of race and religion in American Muslim communities. Currently, she is completing a book on the global dimensions of Islam’s “crisis of authority,” specifically on transnational pedagogical networks that connect American mosques to the intellectual centers of the Middle East, based on ethnographic fieldwork in Cairo, Egypt, Damascus, Syria, and Amman, Jordan. She teaches courses on Muslim in America, US cultural and political interests in the Middle East, and ethnographic and documentary film.

E-mail: zareena.grewal@yale.edu
Homepage: http://americanstudies.yale.edu/faculty/zareena-grewal

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Anthropology

eramiNarges Erami is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology and of International and Area Studies. She primarily works on the relationship between economy and religion and how it is played out in rituals of everyday life. Her work is centered in the Holy city of Qum in Iran. Her past research was a historical and ethnographic study of carpet merchants and the process of self-fashioning through the acquisition of specialized knowledge. Her current research continues to be focused in Qum, examining the cultural production of authority and knowledge through publications of Islamic texts and their global circulation. Her courses include the anthropology of the Middle East in general and Iran specifically, the ‘economic subject’, the anthropology of religion, field methods, and the politics of legitimacy and representation.

E-mail: narges.erami@yale.edu
Homepage: www.yale.edu/anthro/anthropology/Narges_Erami.html


inhornMarcia C. Inhorn is the William K. Lanman, Jr. Professor of Anthropology and International Affairs at Yale University. A specialist on Middle Eastern gender, religion, and health issues, Inhorn has conducted research on the social impact of infertility and assisted reproductive technologies in Egypt, Lebanon, the United Arab Emirates, and Arab America over the past 25 years. She is (co)editor of eight volumes and author of four books on the subject, including The New Arab Man: Emergent Masculinities, Technologies, and Islam in the Middle East, which was published by Princeton University Press in March 2012. Inhorn is the founding editor of the Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies (JMEWS), and co-editor of Berghahn Books’ “Fertility, Reproduction, and Sexuality” series. Inhorn has directed Yale’s Council on Middle East Studies and the Center for Middle Eastern and North African Studies at the University of Michigan. She has served on the Board of Directors of the Middle East Studies Association, and was President of the Society for Medical Anthropology of the American Anthropological Association. In Fall 2010, Inhorn was the first Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professor at the Centre for Gender Studies. She has also been a visiting faculty member at the American University of Beirut and the American University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates.

E-mail: marcia.inhorn@yale.edu
Homepage: www.yale.edu/anthro/anthropology/Marcia_Inhorn.html
www.marciainhorn.com

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Architecture

brittonKarla Cavarra Britton is a Lecturer in the School of Architecture and Resident Director of the Berkeley Center at Yale. Her area of teaching and research is in alternative modernisms, including the monograph Auguste Perret (2001), published by Phaidon in both English and French editions. With Dean Sakamoto, she edited Hawaiian Modern: the Architecture of Vladimir Ossipoff (2007). She is editor of the forthcoming Constructing the Ineffable: Contemporary Sacred Architecture, and she is the author of Modern Urbanism to be published by Yale University Press. She teaches the history of architecture and urbanism. She has taught and led a symposium on modern religious architecture, and is organizing an international conference on sacred architecture of the Middle East.

E-mail: karla.britton@yale.edu
Homepage: http://www.architecture.yale.edu/drupal/people/faculty/britton-karla

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Classics

manningJoseph Manning is the William K. and Marilyn M. Simpson Professor of Classics and History and Senior Research Scholar, Yale Law School. He specializes in Hellenistic history with particular focus on the legal and economic history of Ptolemaic Egypt. His interests lie in governance, reforms of the state, legal institutions, formation of markets, and the impact of new economic institutions (coinage, banking) on traditional socio-economic patterns in the ancient world. He is also deeply concerned with Papyrology, the interpretation of ancient sources, and bringing to bear the historical social sciences, particularly Economic Sociology and economic and legal theory, to ancient history. His current projects include the writing of a history of the Hellenistic world for the new University of Edinburgh Greek history series and an archaeological survey in Upper Egypt.

E-mail: joseph.manning@yale.edu
Homepage: www.yale.edu/classics/faculty_manning.html

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Divinity School

sannehLamin Sannehis the D. Willis James Professor of Missions & World Christianity in Yale Divinity School and a Professor of History. He has studied classical Arabic and Islam and worked in the Middle East, as well as with the churches in Africa and with international organizations concerned with inter-religious issues. He is the author of over two hundred articles on religious and historical subjects, and of several books including Faith and Power: Christianity and Islam in “Secular” Britain (with Lesslie Newbigin and Jenny Taylor, 1998), The Crown and the Turban: Muslims and West African Pluralism (1997), Summoned from the Margin: An African Homecoming (a memoir) (2012), and a forthcoming study, Beyond Jihad: Islam and Society in West Africa (Oxford University Press).

E-mail: lamin.sanneh@yale.edu
Homepage: http://divinity.yale.edu/sanneh

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Economics

Tolga KokerTolga Köker is a Senior Lecturer in Economics. He works on the economics of conflict and the Middle East, and on political economy of Islamism and secularism in Turkey. In particular, his research examines the repercussions of dissimulating revealed preferences under social pressures. He has also written on the political economy of Turkey and Iraq as well as on refugee studies in the Balkans.

E-mail: tolga.koker@yale.edu
Homepage: www.econ.yale.edu/faculty1/koker.htm

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History

Adel Allouche is a Lecturer in History and Religious Studies. He teaches and researches Medieval Islamic history, in particular proto-dynastic rule in early Islamic history and Shi’i-Sunni polemics under the Safavids. He is the author of Mamluk Economics: A Study and Translation of al-Maqrizi's Ighathah (1994) and The Origins and Development of the Ottoman-Safavid Conflict (906-962/1500-1555) (1983) as well as several articles and book reviews.

E-mail: adel.allouche@yale.edu
Homepage: http://history.yale.edu/people/adel-allouche


amanatAbbas Amanat is a Professor of History and of International and Area Studies and is Director of the Iranian Studies Initiative. His teaching and research interests include modern Iran and the Middle East, Shi’ism, and apocalypticism. He is the consulting editor of “Encyclopaedia Iranica” for the 19th century. His publications include, Apocalyptic Islam and Iranian Shi'ism (2009); Pivot of the Universe: Nasir al-Din Shah and the Iranian Monarchy, 1831-1896 (1997, 2009); Resurrection and Renewal: the Making of the Babi Movement in Iran, 1844-1850 (1989, 2005) and In Search of Modern Iran: Authority, Nationhood and Culture (1501-2001) (forthcoming). Most recently he co-edited: Is There a Middle East: the Evolution of a Geographic Concept (2011) and Iran Facing Others: Identity Boundaries in Historical Perspective (2012). His recent courses include Empire, Nationalism and Revolution in the Modern Middle East; From the Great Game to the Great Satan; Narratives of Modern Iran and Myth and Memory in the Persian Book of Kings.

E-mail: abbas.amanat@yale.edu
Homepage: http://history.yale.edu/people/abbas-amanat


marcusIvan Marcus is the Frederick P. Rose Professor of Jewish History and a Professor of Religious Studies. His specializations include the history of Jewish-Christian-Muslim representations of each other, the history of childhood and of life cycle rites of passage. He teaches Jewish history from late antiquity through the e arly modern period. He has offered courses on the history of Jews in Muslim Lands, Jewish-Christian relations, and the Jews in medieval and early modern Europe and the Middle East.

E-mail: ivan.marcus@yale.edu
Homepage: http://history.yale.edu/people/ivan-marcus


mikhailAlan Mikhail is Professor of History. He is a historian of the early modern Muslim world, the Ottoman Empire, and Egypt whose research and teaching focus mostly on the nature of early modern imperial rule, peasant histories, environmental resource management, and science and medicine. He is the author of Nature and Empire in Ottoman Egypt: An Environmental History (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011) and The Animal in Ottoman Egypt (Oxford University Press, 2013) and editor of Water on Sand: Environmental Histories of the Middle East and North Africa (Oxford University Press, 2013). His articles have appeared in the American Historical Review, Comparative Studies in Society and History, the International Journal of Middle East Studies, the Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient, History Compass, the Bulletin of the History of Medicine; and, in Arabic, in al-Rūznāma, Akhbār al-Adab, and Wijhāt Naẓar.

E-mail: alan.mikhail@yale.edu
Homepage: http://history.yale.edu/people/alan-mikhail
Personal Webpabe:
www.alanmikhail.org/

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History of Art

nelsonRobert S. Nelson is the Robert Lehman Professor of the History of Art, specializing in the art of the Mediterranean during the Middle Ages, especially that of the Byzantine Empire. His current work focuses on the relation of Byzantine art to culture and society, and the constitution of Byzantine art and history from 1750 to the present. He is also interested in vision and visuality and the functioning of holy objects in society. He teaches medieval art, mainly in the Eastern Mediterranean, and the history and methods of art history. Recently he has developed a new course on the long history of the city of Byzantion/Constantinople/Istanbul from antiquity to the present. 

E-mail: robert.nelson@yale.edu
Homepage: arthistory.yale.edu/faculty/faculty/faculty_nelson.html


rizviKishwar Rizvi is an Associate Professor in History of Art, specializing in Islamic art and architecture. She has written on representations of religious and imperial authority in the art and architecture of Safavid Iran, as well as on issues of gender, nationalism and religious identity in modern Iran and Pakistan. Her current research focuses on ideology and transnationalism in contemporary mosque architecture in the Middle East. She teaches introductory surveys on Islamic art and architecture, as well as seminars on pilgrimage, gender, and representations of kingship. Her graduate courses focus on modernism and the Middle East, Ottoman, Safavid and Mughal art and architecture, and on the artistic, cultural, and political significance of the documentary survey in Europe and the Middle East from the medieval period to the present.

E-mail: kishwar.rizvi@yale.edu
Homepage: arthistory.yale.edu/faculty/faculty/faculty_rizvi.html

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School of Law

kronmanAnthony Kronman is Sterling Professor of Law. He teaches in the areas of contracts, bankruptcy, jurisprudence, social theory, and professional responsibility. He also directs The Middle East Legal Studies Seminar (MELSS), an annual meeting held since 1998 in which lawyers, judges, and law professors from the Middle East gather with Yale professors and students. The Seminar has successfully brought together established and emerging leaders who are open to reform and committed to democracy in their own countries. Past topics have included the concept of legal authority, fundamental rights, and religious pluralism.

E-mail: anthony.kronman@yale.edu
Homepage: www.law.yale.edu/faculty/AKronman.htm

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School of Management

mobarak(Ahmed) Mushfiq Mobarak is an Assistant Professor of Economics and Management. He is a development economist with interests in public finance (environmental and political economy) issues and has done research on financial sector development and economic growth in the Middle East and North Africa. His current research interests include projects on water management and hydropower in Brazil, and field experiments exploring ways to induce people in developing countries to adopt technologies or behaviors that are likely to be welfare improving. He teaches on the challenges to doing for-profit or non-profit business in developing countries and also leads MBA international experience trips to developing countries, including one to Egypt in 2009.

E-mail: ahmed.mobarak@yale.edu
Homepage: mba.yale.edu/faculty/profiles/mobarak.shtml

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School of Nursing

lazenbyMark Lazenby is an Assistant Professor of Nursing. In addition to holding a Master’s of Science in Nursing, specializing in oncology, from Yale School of Nursing, he also holds a Master’s in Theology from Fuller Theological Seminary and a Ph.D. in Philosophy of Religion from Boston University. Immediately after graduating from YSN in 2009, he worked with his hands as a Fulbright Scholar at the King Hussein Cancer Center (KHCC) in Amman, Jordan, where he and his colleagues are researching the role of religion and spirituality in the well-being of cancer patients treated at KHCC. He has translated into Arabic and validated a questionnaire that assesses spiritual well-being of those with life-limiting illness.  He is particularly interested in the phenomenon of existential distress at the time of death of those who consider themselves religiously devout.

E-mail: mark.lazenby@yale.edu
Homepage: http://nursing.yale.edu/lazenby

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Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations

darnellJohn C. Darnell is a Professor of Egyptology and director of the Yale Egyptological Institute in Egypt and of the Yale Toshka Desert Survey. His interests include ancient Egyptian religion, cryptography, the scripts and texts of Graeco-Roman Egypt, and the archaeological and epigraphic remains of ancient activity in the Egyptian Western Desert. He is an expert on Ancient Egyptian rock inscriptions and lapidary hieratic. He teaches image-assisted courses on Egyptian religion and religious architecture, and a survey of Egyptian history, focusing on the mechanics of unity and disunity within the Nile Valley, as well as a wide range of courses in ancient texts, from those dealing with the underworld and cosmography to love poetry and magic spells.

E-mail: john.darnell@yale.edu
Homepage: http://nelc.yale.edu/john-c-darnell; Egyptology website


Karen Polinger Foster is a Lecturer in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations and History of Art. She specializes in the art and archaeology of the Bronze Age Aegean, with particular interests in interconnections with Egypt and the ancient Near East. Her most recent book, Civilizations of Ancient Iraq (2009), co-authored with Benjamin R. Foster, received the 2010 Felicia A. Holton Book Award from the Archaeological Institute of America. Her current major research project involves the final preparation of Strange and Wonderful: Exotic Flora and Fauna in Image and Imagination, a comprehensive study of this material from ancient to modern times. In something of a departure from her scholarly career, she retold for children a Sumerian folktale and illustrated it with her own cut-paper mosaics based on Sumerian art. The book, The City of Rainbows: A Tale from Ancient Sumer (1999), is regularly used in schools here and abroad, including in Iraq itself.

E-mail: karen.foster@yale.edu
Homepage: http://nelc.yale.edu/karen-foster


frahmEckart Frahm is Professor of Assyriology and primarily interested in Assyrian and Babylonian history and Mesopotamian scholarly texts of the first millennium B.C.E. He is the author of five books, on Assyrian royal inscriptions, Late Babylonian letters, Mesopotamian text commentaries, and the history of the ancient Near East, and of numerous articles on subjects including cuneiform grammatology, the ancient reception of the Gilgamesh epic and the Babylonian epic of creation, Mesopotamian prophecy, Sumerian royal inscriptions and proverbs, Babylonian prisons, and the history of modern scholarship on the ancient Near East. Frahm teaches on Mesopotamian history, religion, and literature, and the Bible in its ancient Near Eastern setting.

E-mail: eckart.frahm@yale.edu
Homepage: http://nelc.yale.edu/eckart-frahm; http://yale.academia.edu/EckartFrahm


gruendlerBeatrice Gruendler is a Professor of Arabic Language and Literature. She is engaged in four areas of research: the development of Arabic script, classical Arabic poetry and its social context, the integration of modern literary theory into the study of Near Eastern literatures, and early Islamic book-culture (3rd/9th century C.E.) viewed within the history of communication. Current projects are a study of the communicative strategies of literati in the ninth century and a media history of early Arabic-Islamic book culture, which she will pursue in 2010-11 as a fellow of the Institute of Advanced Studies in Berlin. She teaches on classics of the Arabic-Islamic world in translation, classical Arabic linguistics, literature (e.g., Layla and Majnun, Abbasid poetry and its social context, al-Mutanabbi, the Maqamat), poetics, Islamic geography, and the history of the Arabic language worldwide from the time before Islam to the present.

E-mail: beatrice.gruendler@yale.edu
Homepage: http://nelc.yale.edu/beatrice-gruendler


Dimitri Gutas is a Professor of Arabic and Graeco-Arabic. He studies and teaches medieval Arabic and the medieval intellectual tradition in Islamic civilization from different aspects. At the center of his concerns lies the study and understanding of classical Arabic in its many forms as a prerequisite for the proper appreciation of the written sources which inform us about the history and culture of Islamic societies. He also has an abiding interest in the transmission of Greek scientific and philosophical works into the Islamic world through the momentous Graeco-Arabic translation movement in Baghdad during the 8th-10th centuries AD (2nd-4th Hijri). Within Arabic philosophy, Gutas has concentrated in particular on its greatest exponent, Ibn Sina (known as Avicenna in the medieval Latin world), on whom he wrote the fundamental Avicenna and the Aristotelian Tradition. Introduction to Reading Avicenna's Philosophical Works (Leiden 1988).

E-mail: dimitri.gutas@yale.edu
Homepage: http://nelc.yale.edu/dimitri-gutas


manassaColleen Manassa is the Marilyn M. and William K. Simpson Associate Professor of Egyptology. Her research interests include Egyptian grammar, New Kingdom literary texts, military history, funerary religion, and social history. She is currently the curator of the ground-breaking exhibit “Echoes of Egypt: Conjuring the Land of the Pharaohs,” on view at the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, and editor of the accompanying catalog and on-line exhibition. Her fifth monograph, Imagining the Past: Historical Fiction in New Kingdom Egypt is currently in press with Oxford University Press. Since 2008, she has directed the Moalla Survey Project, an ongoing archaeological project in Egypt. She teaches widely on the history and literature of ancient Egypt, including surveys of Egyptian Middle Kingdom literature and historical texts, and has also offered text courses on Egyptian and Nubian historical texts and late Egyptian stories.

E-mail: colleen.manassa@yale.edu
Homepage: http://nelc.yale.edu/colleen-manassa


slanskiKathryn Slanski is a Lecturer in Assyriology and Humanities. She studies ancient Mesopotamia at the intersections of sources and approaches and has written on Mesopotamian social and economic history as well as verbal and visual representation of the divine. She teaches Mesopotamian and ancient Near Eastern literature, history, religion, law and justice, visual arts, and ancient languages. Recent course offerings include “The Hero in the Ancient Near East,” an interdisciplinary investigation of the Hero through written, archaeological, and art historical evidence, as well as an advanced Babylonian language course on archival and judicial inscriptions from the second millennium BCE.

E-mail: kathryn.slanski@yale.edu
Homepage: http://nelc.yale.edu/kathryn-slanski


weissHarvey Weiss is a Professor of Near Eastern Archaeology and of Anthropology and in the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. His research interests include Mesopotamia, early agriculture, early cities and empires, Holocene paleoclimatology and the social adaptations to environmental change. He is also the Director of the Tell Leilan Project, which has redefined the relationships between dynamic natural and social forces in the third millennium B.C. through excavation, GPS/GIS-implemented regional survey and paleoclimatology investigations at one of the largest archaeological sites in Syria. The project is now engaged in the retrieval and analysis of the Akkadian Palace, and its collapse (2200 BC), at Tell Leilan.

E-mail: harvey.weiss@yale.edu
Homepage: www.yale.edu/archaeology/f.harveyweiss.html; Tell Leilan Project

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Political Science

lawrenceAdria Lawrence is an Assistant Professor of Political Science and International and Area Studies. She is a scholar of conflict in the Middle East and North Africa, studying how people come to mobilize in favor of ideologies such as ethnicity, nationalism, religion, and democracy. Her current manuscript, Imperial Rule and the Politics of Nationalism, provides an account of how and why nationalist mobilization against colonial rule erupted in the 20th century French Empire. She has also published on the use of violence by non-state actors.  She teaches seminars on “Middle East Exceptionalism” and qualitative field research.  

E-mail: adria.lawrence@yale.edu
Homepage: http://politicalscience.yale.edu/people/adria-lawrence


Ellen Lust is an Associate Professor of Political Science. Her work broadly examines the politics of authoritarianism, and through this, the prospects for development and democracy in the region. She is currently working on a book manuscript examining the politics of elections in the Arab world, as well as a collaborative project focusing on the ways in which ongoing social and economic transformations in Africa and the Middle East affect governance programs (with Stephen Ndegwa, World Bank). She is also an associate editor of a the newly launched journal, Middle East Law and Governance, sponsored by the University of Toronto and Yale University Law Schools. She has studied, conducted research, and led student and alumni groups in Egypt, Jordan, Morocco, Israel, Palestine and Syria.

E-mail: ellen.lust-okar@yale.edu
Homepage: http://politicalscience.yale.edu/people/ellen-lust


MarchAndrew F. March is an Associate Professor of Political Science. He teaches political theory and has a special interest in Islamic political thought, especially the Islamic legal tradition. He is currently at work on a number of projects on Islamic legal theories of the maqasid al-shari‘a (“the purposes of the law”), Islamic moral psychology and the problem of “taking people as they are” in normative ethics, and contemporary Islamic treatments of apostasy and is also developing a book project on Islamic legal theory, Muslim minorities and conceptions of religious freedom. He has written on the problem of Islam and liberal citizenship, namely on the intersection of liberal theory and the Islamic jurisprudence of Muslim minorities (fiqh al-aqalliyyat). He teaches courses on Islamic Political Thought, Islamic Law & Ethics, and Islam & Liberalism.

E-mail: andrew.march@yale.edu
Homepage: http://politicalscience.yale.edu/people/andrew-march

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School of Public Health

khoshnoodKaveh Khoshnood is an Associate Professor at Yale School of Public Health. His primary research interests are the epidemiology, prevention, and control of HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis among drug users, prisoners and other at risk populations in the United States and in resource –poor countries. His other interests include the examination of the links between health and human rights, health and conflict and the ethical dilemmas in research involving vulnerable populations. He conducts research and mentors researchers from China and the Middle East and teaches courses on HIV/AIDS, Research Methods and Ethics.

E-mail: kaveh.khoshnood@yale.edu
Homepage: http://medicine.yale.edu/ysph/people/kaveh_khoshnood.profile

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Religious Studies

boweringGerhard Böwering is a Professor of Islamic Studies. His books include Mystical Vision of Existence in Classical Islam (1980), Sulami's Minor Qur'an Commentary (Ziyadat haq'iq al-tafsir, 1995), Islam and Christianity: the Inner Dynamics of Two Cultures of Belief (2007), Sulami's Sufi Treatises (Rasa'il sufiya, 2009) and Sulami's Sufi Inquiries (Masa'il sufiya, 2010), Negah-e 'Erfani be-vojud (2010), as well as numerous articles, including those in the Encyclopaedia of Islam, the Encyclopedia of the Qur'an, and the Encyclopaedia Iranica. He is currently working on The Dreams and Labors of a Central Asian Muslim Mystic.

E-mail: gerhard.bowering@yale.edu
Homepage: http://religiousstudies.yale.edu/b-wering


davisStephen Davis is a Professor of Religious Studies. He specializes in the social and theological history of Christianity from late antiquity to the medieval period, and his areas of teaching and research include the study of women and gender, pilgrimage and the cult of the saints, the history of biblical interpretation and canon formation, Egyptian Christianity, the Arabic Christian theological tradition, early Christian art and material culture, and the application of anthropological, sociological, and literary methods in the study of historical texts. He serves as Executive Director of the Yale Monastic Archaeology Project (YMAP), where he is engaged in the excavation and conservation of early Christian monastic sites in both Upper and Lower Egypt. He is also initiating a new project to catalogue the Coptic and Arabic manuscripts in the Monastery of the Syrians collection (Wadi al-Natrun, Egypt), for which he will be serving as director and general editor. The collection includes around 350 Coptic MSS and upwards of 1000 Arabic ones, from late antiquity (ca. fifth century CE) to the early modern period.

E-mail: stephen.davis@yale.edu
Homepage: http://religiousstudies.yale.edu/davis; Yale Egyptological Institute


fraadeSteven Fraade is the Mark Taper Professor of the History of Judaism. He is the past chair of the university's Language Study Committee. His research interests include the history of Judaism (in its varieties) in Second Temple and rabbinic times; biblical translation and exegesis in ancient Judaism and Christianity; the history and rhetoric of ancient Jewish law; the Dead Sea Scrolls; literary-rhetorical analysis of tannaitic and amoraic rabbinic texts; attitudes towards ascetic piety in early Judaism; and multilingualism in ancient Jewish culture. He teaches courses on rabbinic literature, the history of Second Temple and rabbinic Judaism, and the Dead Sea Scrolls and regularly offers seminars on midrashic, mishnaic, and talmudic texts, and topics in ancient Jewish history. His most recent book is Legal Fictions: Studies of Law and Narrative in the Discursive Worlds of Ancient Jewish Sectarians and Sages (2011).

E-mail: steven.fraade@yale.edu
Homepage: http://religiousstudies.yale.edu/fraade


griffelFrank Griffel is Professor of Islamic Studies and Chair of the Council on Middle East Studies. His research and teaching is on the intellectual history of Islam, its philosophy and theology (both classical and modern), and the way Islamic thinkers react to Western modernity. Much of his published work covers the contribution that al-Ghazali (d. 1111) made to the development of Islamic theology and the history of philosophy, be it written in Arabic, Latin, or Hebrew. Al-Ghazali marks one of the turning points of Islamic thought, when the role of major intellectual movements such as the Arabic tradition of Aristotelianism (falsafa) and Islamic mysticism (Sufism) were reassessed. Frank Griffel recently published Al-Ghazali's Philosophical Theology (2009), where he studies his life and the way al-Ghazali made philosophical metaphysics and cosmology compatible with Muslim theology. Currently Frank Griffel conducts a research project on the 12th and 13th centuries in Islamic thought, supported by the Carnegie Corporation of New York, that aims at explaining how the two discourses of falsafa and kalam in Islam grew together.

E-mail: frank.griffel@yale.edu
Homepage: http://religiousstudies.yale.edu/griffel


hayesChristine Hayes is a Professor of Religious Studies in Classical Judaica. She is a specialist in talmudic-midrashic studies and the history and literature of Judaism in Late Antiquity. She offers courses on the literature and history of the biblical and talmudic periods (including Introduction to the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible) and on Judaism, as well as advanced text courses

E-mail: christine.hayes@yale.edu
Homepage: http://religiousstudies.yale.edu/hayes


laytonBentley Layton is the Goff Professor of Religious Studies and a Professor of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations. His specializations include gnosticism and heresies, asceticism and monasticism, textual editing and manuscript studies, and Coptic linguistics. He is currently writing on the social history of ancient monasteries, and editing works of the ancient monastic leader Apa Shenoute. He teaches the literary, intellectual, and social history of ancient Christianity in the Mediterranean regions; and the Coptic language.

E-mail: bentley.layton@yale.edu
Homepage: http://religiousstudies.yale.edu/layton; http://nelc.yale.edu/bentley-layton

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Sociology

wyrtzenJonathan Wyrtzen is an Assistant Professor of Sociology and International Affairs. He is a comparative-historical sociologist with teaching and research interests on the areas of state formation, colonialism and empire, ethnicity and nationalism, urban and rural contentious politics, and Islamic social movements, in North Africa and the Middle East. He is completing a book manuscript entitled Constructing Morocco: Colonial State-Building and the Struggle to Define the Nation (1912-1961) that examines the relationships among European imperial expansion, colonial policies of modernization and state formation, and the rise of Arabo-Islamic nationalism in North Africa in the mid-20th century. This study also explores the central roles of three marginal groups – Imazighen (Berbers), Jews, and women – in defining Moroccan identity during the mobilization of anti-colonial nationalism. He is also beginning another project comparing tribal insurgency movements against the colonial state in the 1920s in North Africa and the Middle East.

E-mail: jonathan.wyrtzen@yale.edu
Homepage: www.yale.edu/sociology/faculty/pages/wyrtzen/

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