Jack M. Balkin

 


Knight Professor of Constitutional Law and the First Amendment

Director, The Information Society Project at Yale Law School

 

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Books

Living Originalism Living Originalism (Harvard University Press, 2011), argues that the best versions of originalism and living constitutionalism are not in conflict but are compatible. It shows why modern conceptions of civil rights and civil liberties, and the modern state’s protection of national security, health, safety, and the environment, are fully consistent with the Constitution’s original meaning. And it explains how both liberals and conservatives, working through political parties and social movements, play important roles in the ongoing project of constitutional construction.

 

 

Constitutional Redemption Constitutional Redemption: Political Faith in an Unjust World (Harvard University Press, 2011), argues that what makes the Constitution legitimate is Americans' enduring faith that its promises can be redeemed, and that the constitutional system can be brought closer to a "more perfect union."

 

 

 

 

The Constitution in 2020 The Constitution in 2020 (Oxford University Press 2009) edited with Reva Siegel, features essays by some of America's finest constitutional thinkers about how we should interpret the U.S. Constitution and address the key constitutional challenges of the 21st century.

 

 

Processes of Constitutional Decisionmaking Processes of Constitutional Decisionmaking, co-edited with Paul Brest, Sanford Levinson, Akhil Amar and Reva Siegel, is now in its fifth edition. Long famous for its unique historical approach, the book makes a significant statement about the constitutional canon. You can learn more about the book here.

 

 

 

Cybercrime: Digital Cops in a Networked Environment Cybercrime: Digital Cops in a Networked Environment (New York University Press 2007) edited with James Grimmelman, Eddan Katz, Nimrod Kozlovski, Shlomit Wagman, and Tal Zarsky, features essays by leading experts in law, criminal justice, and security studies about crime prevention and security protection in the electronic age. Ranging from new government requirements that facilitate spying to new methods of digital proof, the book explains how criminal law-and even crime itself-have been transformed in our networked world.

 

The State of Play The State of Play: Law, Games and Virtual Worlds (New York University Press 2006) edited with Beth Noveck, contains essays about the legal issues raised by virtual worlds and massively-multiplayer online games. The authors include some of the foremost legal scholars, policy analysts and game designers working on the challenges of new virtual environments, where people work, play, and spend increasing proportions of their lives.

 

 

What Roe v. Wade Should Have Said What Roe v. Wade Should Have Said: America's Top Legal Experts Rewrite America's Most Controversial Decision (New York University Press 2005) features eleven rewritten versions of the Roe opinion, both for and against the right to abortion, offered by some of the leading constitutional scholars in the United States. The book also includes a critical introduction to the Roe opinion and its legacy.

 

What Brown v. Board of Education Should Have Said What Brown v. Board of Education Should Have Said: America's Top Legal Experts Rewrite America's Landmark Civil Rights Decision (New York University Press 2001) features nine versions of the Brown opinion by some of the leading constitutional and civil rights scholars in the United States, as well as a critical introduction to the Brown opinion, a history of the Brown litigation, and a discussion of the continuing debates over the decision's legacy. You can learn more about the book here. Also visit the book's companion website, BrownvBoard.com-- An Interactive Civil Rights Chronology, which describes important historical events in the struggle for civil rights.

 

The Laws of Change The Laws of Change: I Ching and the Philosophy of Life (Sybil Creek Press 2009) is a new translation of and commentary on the I Ching or Book of Changes, one of the oldest books in human history and a treasure of world literature. This new edition presents the Book of Changes as a book of wisdom, a work of practical philosophy that teaches how to cultivate one's character, achieve emotional balance and maintain one's values and one's integrity in the face of adversity and ever-changing circumstances. You can learn more about the book here.

 

Cultural Software Cultural Software: A Theory of Ideology (Yale University Press 1998) is a new theory of culture, cultural evolution and memetics that explains how ideologies and beliefs grow, spread, and develop in human minds. It is the first book to apply the study of memes and cultural evolution to the theory of ideology. You can learn more about the book here.

 

Processes of Constitutional Decisionmaking Legal Canons, (New York University Press, 2000) co-edited with Sanford Levinson, explores the idea of canon in law and legal scholarship. It features fifteen essays by leading legal scholars focusing on what the canon and canonicity mean for different areas and aspects of law. You can learn more about the book here.

 

 

 

 

Selected Recent Essays