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There are a number of ways to stay in touch while you're on the road, and many factors that influence which is the best method for you. This document attempts to elucidate the issues and explain what can be a very confusing process.

Here is a list of possible methods; a discussion of the pros and cons of each method follows below.


Method I: Using your own computer with a Yale PPP/ARA account

Advantages

Disadvantages

If you currently have a remote access (PPP or ARA) account with Yale, you have a portable computer, and you won't be away from Yale for an extended period of time, you may find it most convenient to continue to use your normal method of connection. If you choose this method you will need to change the phone number your software is dialing:

If you use Eudora, you may also want to make sure that it is set to minimize the amount of time you spend on the phone line:


Method II: Using your own computer with a non-Yale Internet Service Provider

Advantages

Disadvantages

If you're going to be away from Yale for an extended period of time, it may be worth it to get an account with a commercial Internet Service Provider (ISP). Yale doesn't have any arrangement with any ISPs, so you're on your own as far as picking one goes (try the Yellow Pages, or The List, a list of ISPs). If you're going to be travelling internationally, make sure you get an account with a provider that has local phone numbers in all the places you'll be staying.

Once you've picked an ISP, you'll need to install their software on your computer. Note that if you have any trouble with their software, you'll need to call your new ISP, since we won't be able to answer questions not pertaining to Yale's software. The software from your new ISP takes care of connecting your computer to the Internet; once that connection is established, you have several options for checking your mail:


Method III: Using a friend or relative's computer with a non-Yale Internet Service Provider

Advantages

Disadvantages

If you're going to have regular access to a friend or relative's machine that already has a working connection to the Internet, then it may be most convenient for you to use that computer to check your email. In this case, you're probably best off using Telnet and Pine rather than trying to set up Eudora (as Eudora will tend to leave copies of your mail on that person's machine). See above for instructions on using Telnet from a non-Yale ISP.


Method IV: Using any computer with a modem, with a Yale terminal dialin connection

Advantages

Disadvantages

If you don't have a PPP or ARA account, but have access to a computer with a modem, you can use a terminal emulation program to dial in to Yale's terminal dialin lines. It's not very pretty, but if you're used to using Pine and you're in the New Haven area it might be worth it.


Method V: Using a computer at an institution/business, connected via ethernet/LAN

Advantages

Disadvantages

If you're going to be affiliated with or have access to an institution or business during your period of travel, you may be able to use their computers to access email. It's generally a good idea to find out in advance if this will be possible, since there are a number of ways the local computing people could restrict access to outside sites (a firewall) or prevent outside people from using the local computers (e.g. through a restricted login to the machine itself). You're probably best off using Telnet and Pine rather than trying to set up Eudora (as Eudora will tend to leave copies of your mail on that person's machine). See above for instructions on using Telnet from a non-Yale ISP.

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