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Documents >  Harriet Jacobs to Amy Post. April 4, 1853
In this letter to Amy Post, Jacobs angrily reports that Stowe had declined to have Louise accompany her to England. "She was afraid that if her situation as a Slave should be known it would subject her to much petting and patronizing which would be more pleasing to a young Girl than useful."


March April 4th [1853]

My Dear friend

I steal this moment to scratch you a few lines I should have writen you before but I have been waiting with the hope of having some thing to tell you from our friend Mrs Stowe but as it is I hardly know where to begin for my thoughts come rushing down with such a . . . [obliterated] *spirit* of rivalry each wishing to be told you first so that they fill my heart and . . . [obliterated] make my eyes dim therefore my silence must express to you what my poor pen is not capable of doing but you know dear Amy that . . . [obliterated] I have a heart towards you filled with love and gratitude for all the interest you have so kindly shown in my behalf I wish that I could sit by you and talk instead of writing but that pleasure is denied and I am thankful and I am than for this Mrs Stowe recieved your letter and Mrs Willis she said it would be much care to her to take Louisa as she went by invitation it would not be right and she was afraid that if her situation as a Slave should be known it would subject her to much petting and patronizing which would be more pleasing to a young Girl than useful and the English was very apt to do it and sh was very much opposed to it with this class of people I will leave the rest for you to solve but remem that I mene to pay Louisa expenses your letter she sent to Mrs Willis asking might she trouble her so far as to ask if this most extraordinary event was true in all its bearings and if she might use it in her key I had never opend my lips to Mrs Willis concerning my Children in the Charitableness of her own heart she sympathised with me and never asked their origin my suffering she knew it embarrassed me at first but I told her the truth but we both thought it was wrong in Mrs Stowe to have sent you letter she might have written to enquire if she liked Mrs Willis wrote her a very kind letter begang that she would not use any of the facts in he key saying that I wished it to be a history of my life entirely by itsslf which would do more good and it needed no romance but if she wanted some facts for her book that I would be most happy to give her some she never answered the letter she wrote again and I wrote twice with no better success it was not Lady*like* to treat Mrs Willis so she would not have done it to . . . [obliterated] any one I think she did not like my objectian I cant help it


Citation:

Autograph letter; Isaac and Amy Post Family Papers, University of Rochester Library.