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The Extent of Negro Progress

Monroe. N. Work, ed.

Indexed by:   Subject | Author | Date | Document Type
Listed Under:  Statistical Information

Citation Information:  Monroe. N. Work. The Extent of Negro Progress. The Negro Yearbook, an Annual Encyclopedia of the Negro, 1921-1922. The Negro Year Book Publishing Company: Tuskegee Institute, 1922.



The Extent of Negro Progress

On December 18, 1865, the Thirteenth Amendment declaring slavery abolished in the United States was adopted. This freed the million or more slaves to whom the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863 did not apply. It may be said for this reason that January 1, 1866 was the beginning of the opportunity for the Negroes in every part of the nation to make progress. In the past fifty-six years he has made a most remarkable progress. What follows show the extent of this progress:

 
1866
1922
Gain in Fifty-six years
ECONOMIC PROGRESS
Homes Owned
Farms Operated
Business Conducted
Wealth Accumulated

EDUCATIONAL PROGRESS
Per Cent Literate
Colleges and Normal Schools
Students in Public Schools
Teachers in all Schools
Property for Higher Education
Annual Expenditures for Education
Raised by Negroes

RELIGIOUS PROGRESS
Number of Churches
Number of Communicants
Number of Sunday Schools
Sunday School Pupils
Value of Church Property

12,000
20,000
2,100
$20,000,000


10
15
100,000
600
$60,000
$700,000
$80,000


700
600,000
1,000
500,000
$1,500,000

650,000
1,000,000
60,000
$1,500,000,000


80
500
2,000,000
44,000
$30,000,000
$28,000,000
$2,000,000


45,000
4,800,000
46,000
2,250,000
$90,000,000

638,000
980,000
57,900
$1,480,000,000


70
485
1,900,000
43,400
$29,940,000
$27,300,000
$1,920,000


44,300
4,200,000
45,000
2,200,000
$88,500,000