Ben Cashore, Ph.D.
Faculty Host

Dr. Ben Cashore is Assistant Professor of Sustainable Forest Policy, and Chair, Program on Forest Certification, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, New Haven, CT. His research interests include globalization and the privatization of environmental governance (forest certification/eco-labeling), forest resource policies of Canada, the United States and globally, the political economy of US/Canada forest products trade, and forest industry environmental/sustainability initiatives. He earned BA and MA degrees in political science from Carleton University, a Certificate from Université d'Aix-Marseille III in French Studies, and a PhD in political science from the University of Toronto. He was a Fulbright Scholar at Harvard University during 1996-7. Dr. Cashore is author of several articles and books on forest policy, including Governing Through Markets: Forest Certification and the Emergence of Non-state Authority (with Graeme Auld, and Deanna Newsom), and In Search of Sustainability: The Politics of Forest Policy in British Columbia in the 1990s (with George Hoberg, Michael Howlett, Jeremy Raynor and Jeremy Wilson).

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Fred Gale, Ph.D.
Faculty Host

Dr. Fred Gale lectures in public policy, political economy and Third World development at the School of Government, University of Tasmania, Australia. He researches global forest governance, product certification and the political economy of trade and the environment. His publications include The Tropical Timber Trade Regime (Macmillan/Palgrave, 1998); Nature, Production, Power: Towards an Ecological Political Economy (Edward Elgar, 2000, co-edited with Michael M’Gonigle); and Setting the Standard: Lessons for BC and Beyond (forthcoming, with Chris Tollefson and David Haley). With funding from the Australian Research Council, he is undertaking comparative research with Marcus Haward on state responses to forestry and fisheries certification in Canada, Australia and United Kingdom.

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Errol Meidinger, Ph.D.
Faculty Host

Dr. Errol Meidinger is Professor of Law and Adjunct Professor of Sociology at the State University of New York in Buffalo, where he also serves as Vice Dean of Law for Research and Interdisciplinary Initiatives. He is also Honorary Professor of Forestry and Environmental Science at the University of Freiburg, Germany, where he regularly offers short courses and directs PhD students. Most of his research focuses on innovative institutional arrangements for promoting environmental conservation and social justice. These include non-governmental regulatory structures such as forest certification and fair labor standards programs, mechanisms for promoting ecosystem management, citizen suits for enforcing environmental laws, new ways of ascertaining and recognizing indigenous resource rights, and expanded engagement by scientists in policy making. He earned his J.D. in Law and Ph.D. in Sociology from Northwestern University.

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Deanna Newsom
Research Coordinator

Deanna Newsom has been Program Associate at the Rainforest Alliance since 2001, where she works in the TREES Program, a sister to the FSC-accredited SmartWood certification program. At TREES she conducts research to better understand the effects of certification and to improve certification systems. She is author (with Ben Cashore and Graeme Auld) of the forthcoming book Governing Through Markets: Forest Certification and the Emergence of Non-state Authority, published by Yale University Press. Her Master’s thesis examined how regional characteristics of Germany, British Columbia, and the US South influenced the ability of competing forest certification programs to gain support from forest companies and landowners. Ms. Newsom has been a SmartWood assessment team member, and conducted ecological research in the coastal temperate rainforests of British Columbia, Canada, from 1995-1999. She holds a M.S. in Forestry (2001) from Auburn University and a B.S. in Biology (1995) from the University of Victoria.

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Elizabeth Gordon
Symposium Coordinator

Elizabeth Gordon serves as YPFC’s Program Associate, where she oversees both the day-to-day and long-term aspects of the program, such as managing program staff and projects, coordinating main events, and serving as a liaison to the Yale and outside community. In May 2003, Liz completed her Master’s of Environmental Management at Yale’s School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, where she concentrated her efforts on an interdisciplinary approach to wildlife conservation and advocacy. Prior to her graduate work, she pursued a range of environmental efforts, from grassroots organizing and local wildlife rehabilitation to research and outreach with national non-profits such as the Environmental Law Institute and Environmental Defense. In graduate school, Liz focused on the immediate threat posed by commercial bushmeat hunting to the African great apes -- chimpanzees, bonobos, and gorillas. She combined her academic work with a project at the Bushmeat Crisis Task Force, where she helped create and pilot-test an outreach campaign devoted to the bushmeat crisis. Liz has been recognized both as a Doris Duke Conservation Fellow and a Teresa Heinz Scholar for Environmental Research for her graduate work. Her conservation work is grounded by a degree from Stanford University in Human Biology (BA 1998).

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Michael Conroy, Ph.D.
Symposium Advisor

Dr. Michael E. Conroy is a member of the faculty of the Yale University School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. An economist, he taught for nearly 25 years at the University of Texas at Austin. His current research focuses on the impact of globalization on poverty worldwide. In particular, he works on the alleviation of poverty through the creation and management of voluntary, stakeholder-based, and advocacy-led certification programs for social and environmental responsibility by corporations and producers of goods and services at every level of production. Prior to joining Yale University, Dr. Conroy was a Senior Program Officer for nine years at the Ford Foundation. He worked in the environment and development field, and his work included a focus on strengthening the ability of local communities to understand, influence, and take advantage of global processes, and to receive compensation for negative consequences that may occur.

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Barbara Bamberger
Symposium Advisor

Barbara Bamberger is an Applied Social Scientist with EDAW, an international environmental research firm working with subsistence communities on sustainable resource management issues Ms Bamberger is currently studying the social effects of oil and gas development on Native Alaskan communities in the Arctic. Ms. Bamberger is also a staff member of the Yale Program on Forest Certification. She advises on symposium matters and has developed partnerships on behalf of the symposium and YPFC. She is an auditor for SmartWood and former Program Associate for the Yale Program on Forest Certification. Ms. Bamberger is a former Switzer Foundation Environment Fellow and she completed a graduate fellowship at the Woods Hole Research Center, her research centered on the effectiveness of parks and indigenous reserves in the Brazilian Amazon. She was a delegate in the United Nations International Leadership Academy, a program on peace and conflict negotiations based in Amman, Jordan. Ms. Bamberger has advanced degrees from the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies at Yale University and in Sustainable International Development at Brandeis University's Heller School for Social Policy. Ms. Bamberger She holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Economics from the University of Wisconsin - Madison. Ms. Bamberger spent ten years in California, developing environmental policies for local government (City of Chula Vista) and working with the Sierra Club, an NGO.

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Cristina Balboa
Symposium Advisor

Cristina Balboa is a Ph.D. Student in Yale’s School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and an advisor to YPFC’s Symposium on Forest Certification in Developing and Transitioning Societies. Prior to Yale, Ms. Balboa worked at the World Resources Institute, where she researched coastal and marine issues in Southeast Asia and the Western Pacific, specifically, the ornamental fish trade and its efforts towards sustainability. She received a BA from the University of Michigan Residential College and an MS from Johns Hopkins University. Her diverse experience in conservation has led her to field work throughout Latin America, Southeast Asia and the Western Pacific and has focused on equity issues from gender and development, to the United States' imports of live reef fish for the ornamental fish trade, to international environmental agreements and the participation of local communities in policymaking. Her dissertation research focuses on the role of international conservation NGOs as policymakers in developing countries.

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Laura Bozzi
Student Assistant

Laura Bozzi is a second year Master of Environmental Management student at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Her primary interests in natural resource policy lie in the potential success of non-timber forest product (NTFP) certification, particularly in Brazil, and in marine and fisheries policy, notably in New England (USA). She recently interned at the Tellus Institute and authored a chapter on NTFPs for a USAID sponsored handbook on small-scale development activities in Africa. She graduated cum laude from Yale University in 2003 with a B.S. in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. Her international experience includes studying protected areas in Costa Rica and living, each for two years, in Sao Paulo, Brazil and Basel, Switzerland.

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Monika Kumar
Student Assistant

Monika Kumar is a first-year graduate student pursuing a Master’s in Environmental Management at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. In her studies, Monika is focusing on discovering techniques for bridging government policies and business strategies to ensure water security for the Indian population. After attaining her B.A. from Queens College, CUNY, Monika worked with numerous non-profits in organizing including the New York Public Interest Research Group and the Gaia Institute. She has also worked in several departments of the United Nations Development Programme.

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