Ben Cashore

Faculty Director

Email: benjamin.cashore@yale.edu

Benjamin Cashore is a Professor of Environmental Policy and Governance, specializing in Sustainable Forest Policy, at Yale University’s School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. He is Director of the Yale Program on Forest Policy and Governance and is courtesy joint appointed (Associate Professor) in Yale’s Department of Political Science. He holds a PhD in political science from the University of Toronto, BA and MA degrees in political science from Carleton University, and a certificate from Université d'Aix-Marseille III in French Studies. He was a Fulbright Scholar at Harvard University during the 1996-1997 academic year.

Cashore has held positions as Assistant Professor, School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, Auburn University (1998-2001); postdoctoral fellow, Forest Economics and Policy Analysis Research Unit, University of British Columbia (1997-1998), and as a policy advisor to the leader of the Canadian New Democratic Party (1990-1993).

Cashore's recent book, Governing Through Markets: Forest Certification and the Emergence of Non-state Authority (with Graeme Auld and Deanna Newsom) was awarded the International Studies Association’s 2005 Sprout prize for the best book on international environmental policy and politics. Published by Yale University Press in 2004, the book identifies the emergence of non-state market driven global environmental governance, and compares its support within European and North American forest sectors.

Cashore is also co-editor of Forest Policy for Private Forestry (with Teeter and Zhang), CAB International; and coauthor of In Search of Sustainability: The Politics of Forest Policy in British Columbia in the 1990s (with George Hoberg, Michael Howlett, Jeremy Raynor and Jeremy Wilson) from the University of British Columbia Press.

He is also author or co-author of several articles that have appeared in Governance, Policy Sciences, the Canadian Journal of Political Science, Business and Politics, Forest Policy and Economics, the Journal of Forestry, Canadian Public Administration, Canadian-American Public Policy, the Russian Journal of Sociology and Social Anthropology and the Forestry Chronicle, as well as chapters in several edited books published by Oxford University Press, Ashgate Press, Macmillan UK, Transaction Press, the University of British Columbia Press, the University of Toronto Press, CAB International, Forstbuch Press, and IUFRO.

In addition to the 2005 Sprout prize, Cashore was awarded (with Steven Bernstein) the 2001 John McMenemy prize for the best article to appear in the Canadian Journal of Political Science in the year 2000 for their article, "Globalization, Four Paths of Internationalization and Domestic Policy Change: The Case of Eco-forestry in British Columbia, Canada."

Connie McDermott

Program Director & Associate Research Scientist

Email: constance.mcdermott@yale.edu

Connie McDermott is Program Director and Associate Research Scientist for the Yale Program on Forest Policy and Governance. She has conducted work and research in social forestry, forest certification and forest policy in North and Central America, South Asia, and globally. She completed a B.A. in Anthropology at Amherst College, an M.S. in Social Forestry at the University of Washington, and a doctorate in Forestry at the University of British Columbia. Her dissertation, entitled Personal Trust and Trust in Abstract Systems: A Study of Forest Stewardship Council-Accredited Forest Certification in British Columbia, involves an in-depth analysis of the social dynamics of FSC’s development in the province of British Columbia.

McDermott served as the first British Columbia Representative for the FSC-accredited SmartWood Program of the Rainforest Alliance, and has participated as a social assessor in numerous FSC-accredited certification assessments in BC and elsewhere. She has conducted socio-economic monitoring and research in the US, Nepal and Costa Rica and has served as a community forester in Nepal. Her current research focus includes international comparative work, examining domestic, regional and global forest policy and governance.

Graeme Auld

PhD Student

Email: graeme.auld@yale.edu

Graeme Auld's work activities involve research comparing certification development in North America and Europe, and on firm level choice of certification policy options. Graeme has conducted surveys on the perceptions of forest companies in the US with regard to various global and national forest certification programs. Graeme is a graduate of Auburn University in the Graduate School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences; while there he completed a thesis comparing how certification systems developed in the United Kingdom, the United States Pacific Coast, and British Columbia, Canada. Since then, he has continued his work on this topic for inclusion in the near finished book entitled "Politics Within Markets: Regulating Forestry Through Non-State Environmental Governance." Future work will involve conducting interviews in Sweden and Finland and reporting on findings explaining variability in forestry company support for forest certification programs. In September 2002, Graeme began a one-year contract working with the YPFC to study why firms favor one certification versus another.

Cristina Balboa

PhD Student

Email: cristina.balboa@yale.edu

Cristina Balboa is a Ph.D. Student in Yale’s School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Within the university’s Program on Forest Certification, Cristina is currently working on a project that examines certification’s role in conservation and development within developing countries. Prior to coming to Yale, Cristina was a researcher at the World Resources Institute, where she worked on coastal and marine issues in Southeast Asia and the Western Pacific. Specifically, she researched the ornamental fish trade and its efforts towards sustainability through a combination of on-the-ground capacity building, regional policy, and certification, among other efforts.Cristina received a BA from the University of Michigan Residential College and an MS from Johns Hopkins University. Her undergraduate thesis on gender and development lead her to work as a gender specialist and project sociologist in Ecuador. Her Master’s thesis examined the United States' imports of live reef fish for the ornamental fish trade. Because of both her past accomplishments and the potential of her work make a lasting contribution to the way conservation is done, Cristina was chosen to be an Environmental Leadership Program Fellow in 2003. This two year fellowship is designed to develop a new generation of environmental leadership characterized by diversity, innovation, collaboration, and effective communications ---all necessities in this new era of global and environmental complexity.

Cristina’s doctoral research examines the role of international conservation non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in resource management and policymaking. Her research examines the legitimacy of the new governance roles played by NGOs, in search of mechanisms to ensure their accountability to resource-dependent communities.

Kelly Levin

PhD Student

Email: kelly.levin@yale.edu

A graduate of Yale College (B.A. in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology ‘02) and Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies (FES) (M.E.M. ‘03), Kelly Levin has recently rejoined the FES community as a PhD candidate. Before returning to Yale, Kelly was a climate policy/technical analyst at NESCAUM (Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management) in Boston. As a member of their climate and energy team, she primarily devoted her time to developing a regional greenhouse gas registry, which will house corporate-wide voluntary emissions reports as well as track emissions and allowances for the imminent cap-and-trade program in the Northeast. Most passionate about climate change and biodiversity issues, she is dedicating her work at Yale to improving global governance of protected areas management, specifically in folding in strategies to adapt to climate change. Kelly will be examining certification of parks as one possible way to enhance park management of climate change impacts.

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gabiBrian Milakovsky

Master's Student Research Assistant

Email: brian.milakovsky@yale.edu

Brian is doing research for the Program on forest trade and governance, particularly pertaining to the Russian Federation. He has traveled to the Russian Far East as a research assistant to study the effect of Chinese timber demand on Russia’s forest industry, and on the potential for forest certification in this key region. Other focus areas in Russia include the privatization of forest industry, management of high conservation value forests, and the implementation of the new Forest Code.

Brian studied forestry at the University of Maine before coming to Yale. He has worked in forest research and industry in Maine, including two summers with the Baskahegan Company, a FSC-certified timberland owner. He is a licensed intern forester in Maine, writing management plans for small woodlots. He hopes to develop this work in to a forest consulting business providing management services to landowners in north temperate and boreal forests.

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MarisaPeter Christensen

Master's Student Research Assistant

Email: peter.christensen@yale.edu

Peter is a first year master of environmental science candidate.  He is interested in issues of governance of natural resources, climate adaptation, and and strategies for assessing local vulnerability.  Peter has worked on these issues in the US, India, Mexico and Cuba.  He is currently developing a comparison investigation of climate adaptation policy as it emerges around the world.  Within our program, Peter is working on climate related policy research.

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gabiGabriela Alonso

Master's Student Research Assistant

Email: gabriela.alonso@yale.edu

Gabriela Alonso is pursuing a Master of Environmental Management at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Gabriela has a BSc in Envrionmental Engineering from ITESO University, Mexico. Prior to arriving at Yale, Gabriela spent two years working at the National Forest Commission in Mexico, proposing strategies for the evaluation of the programs implemented by the Commission, and striving to make efficient use of the institutions’ budget. She has also worked at the State Environmental Agency of Jalisco Mexico.

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ToddTodd Jones

Master's Student Research Assistant

Email: todd.jones@yale.edu

Originally from San Diego, California, Todd Jones was graduated from the University of California, Berkeley with a B.S. in Environmental Science and a B.A. in Political Science in 2004. His previous work and internship experience includes a research assistantship with the California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations (CalCOFI) program at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO), a research assistantship with Dr. Wayne Sousa at the University of California, Berkeley, three years of full-time work as an environmental scientist and environmental service line department leader with Professional Service Industries, Inc. (PSI), and an internship with the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO). Todd is currently a first-year MESc student at F&ES in its Social Ecology of Conservation and Development focal area. Broadly, he intends to concentrate on climate change and energy policy, global environmental governance, environmental and development policy integration, and energy and land management.

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arvindArvind Nagarajan

Student Research Assistant

Email: arvind.nagarajan@yale.edu

Arvind is an undergraduate looking to major in Economics and Political Science. He became interested in environmental issues by working on a project with Professor Brian Talbot of the University of Michigan on a project on the benefits of green roofs. He hopes to gain greater knowledge of different aspects of forest management through his research at the Yale Program on Forest Policy and Governance.

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gabiIrene Scher

Student Research Assistant

Email: irene.scher@yale.edu

Irene is an undergraduate in the Environmental Studies program at Yale.
She is particularly interested in forest policy, the emerging role of
the private sector in forest governance, and land protections in forest
ecosystems. She has spent the last year working for the International
Boreal Conservation Campaign under the Pew Charitable Trusts and her
undergraduate thesis is an analysis of recent land protections in
Canada's Boreal Forest. Irene hopes to continue her studies at Yale by
pursuing a masters degree from FES.