SEVENTH AMERICAN FOREST CONGRESS


Many Voices - A Common Vision


Local Roundtable Vision Statements



Montgomery, Alabama
Anchorage, Alaska
Juneau, Alaska
Petersburg, Alaska
Little Rock, Arkansas
Sedona, Arizona
Arcata, California
Los Angeles, California
Redding, California
San Bernadino, California
San Diego, California
Grand Junction, Colorado
Haddam, Connecticut
District of Columbia
Lake City, Florida
Savannah, Georgia
Moscow, Idaho
Jasper, Indiana
Wabash, Indiana
Ames, Iowa
Alexandria, Louisiana
Augusta, Maine
Baltimore, Maryland
Amherst, Massachusetts
Gaylord, Michigan
St. Paul, Minnesota
Lake of the Ozarks, Missouri
Kalispell, Montana
Libby, Montana
Reno, Nevada
Durham, New Hampshire [a.k.a. "The New England Forest Roundtable"]
New Brunswick, New Jersey
Santa Fe, New Mexico
Fly Creek, New York
New York, New York
Paul Smiths, New York
Corvallis, Oregon
La Grande, Oregon
Portland, Oregon
Columbia, South Carolina
Rapid City, South Dakota
Nashville, Tennessee
Nacogdoches, Texas
Charlottesville, Virginia
Seattle, Washington
Spokane, Washington
Flatwoods, West Virginia
Wausau, Wisconsin
Moran, Wyoming


Montgomery, Alabama

Roundtable Vision
November 15, 1995

America's forests for the future will be healthy and sustainable ‹biologically, ecologically, socially and economically. They will be diverse in ownership, uses and conditions, and productive in values which enhance the quality of life for all Americans. Their management will be based on credible science in partnership with community values.

Roundtable organizing committee contact:
Ted Meredith
Alabama Forest Resources Center
3632-C Dauphin St.
Mobile, AL 36608
Voice: (334) 343-9747
Fax: (334) 621-1382


Anchorage, Alaska

Roundtable Vision
November 4, 1995

Overall the forests of the United States are managed for long-term ecosystem integrity and sustainability, based on credible science and the values of an educated, knowledgeable, informed, and diverse society. These forest ecosystems are an integral part of a healthy biosphere and contribute to the quality of life for current and future generations by providing for the fulfillment of spiritual, economic, and cultural needs.

Roundtable organizing committee contact:
Dan Ketchum
Chair, Alaska SAF
Alaska Division of Forestry
3601 C St., Suite 1034
Anchorage, AK 99503
Voice: (907)-762-2125
Fax: (907)-561-6659


Juneau, Alaska

Roundtable Vision
November 18, 1995

Large areas of forest will remain intact where natural conditions prevail, thus providing flexibility for choices by future generations; healthy sustainable forests including all components which contribute to a healthy planet; more economic incentives to reduce use or recycle forest products rather than cut down forests; keep as many old growth stands preserved as possible; forests where one might find solitude, vastness of space, and spiritual renewal for generations to come; and healthy, diverse, sustainable resource base for plants and wildlife, and for economic, subsistence, and cultural use.

Roundtable organizing committee contact:
John Sandor
Alaska-Pacific Rim Consulting Services
P.O. Box 21135
Juneau, AK 99802-1135
Voice: (907)-586-2497
Fax: (907)-586-2490
Email: jsandor@ptialaska.net


Petersburg, Alaska

Roundtable Vision
December 16, 1995

The roundtable developed 34 vision themes. The ten themes listed below reflect the themes that received more than ten votes in the dotting exercise.

  • Maintain and/or restore representative wilderness and old growth forests across the country.
  • We support a long-term sustainable basis for all aspects of the forest: timber, wildlife and fisheries, human uses.
  • Manage forests for multiple uses and sustained yield of all resources.
  • Manage forests in a sustainable manner to provide timber for a diverse array of operators.
  • Restructure range of size for timber sales (for local and regional needs).
  • Steady and sustainable supply of available projected harvestable timber.
  • Emphasis on local control of forests/direct local involvement in use determinations.
  • We would like to see the Forest Service responsible to policies and accountability in order to achieve a sustainable yield.
  • A healthy, sustainable renewable forest; management is not the same for all forests, and considers local input.
  • Sustainable multiple use; dependable supply for multiple use (not "guaranteed" but "best estimate as we continue to learn"); sustained, ecosystems intact.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Patricia A. Grantham
    USDA Forest Service
    PO Box 202
    Petersburg, AK 99833
    Voice: (907)-772-3871


    Little Rock, Arkansas

    Roundtable Vision
    August 4-5, 1995

    What we see as a vision for the forests of the future is a continuum of forests from pristine wilderness to intensive fiber farms. We acknowledge that different ownerships have different uses and responsibilities and all owners‹both public and private‹will generate some mix from the following values: ecological processes and functions including natural, aquatic, and terrestrial diversity; economic values; recreation and other amenities; and clean water and other environmental values. Forest practices should be carried out and maintained to improve water quality, and private land owners and industry should work together to ensure responsible logging. The cornerstone for achieving this goal of a diverse forest is balanced environmental and economic forest education.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Sandra Miller, Executive Director
    Faulkner County United Way
    8 Chester Cove
    Conway, AR 72032
    Voice: (501)-327-5087
    Fax: (501)-327-5087


    Sedona, Arizona

    Roundtable Vision
    November 17, 1995

    America's forests are a mosaic of ecosystems, managed to be sustainable over the long term with the full and knowledgeable participation of all interests. Our forests support biological diversity, ecological and evolutionary processes, and an array of cultural, social and economic uses and benefits.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Mary Lee Dunning
    Friends of the Forest
    411 Palisades Dr. S.
    Sedona, AZ 86336
    Voice: (520)-204-1118
    Fax: (520)-204-2594
    E-mail: richardd@sedona.net


    Arcata, California

    Roundtable Vision
    November 4, 1995

    We envision private and publicly owned forests that are sustainably used, managed, enhanced and protected for a wide range of goods, services, values and functions. Stewardship of these forests must be socially responsive and responsible and be grounded in objective science. Forest policies must respect the diversity of forest types and ownerships and provide economic and other incentives to achieve healthy future forest conditions.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Jerry Allen, Professor
    Humboldt State University
    Arcata, CA 95521
    Voice: (707)-826-4243
    Fax: (707)-826-5634
    E-mail: gmal@axe.humboldt.edu


    Los Angeles, California

    Roundtable Vision
    December 2, 1995

    The future of a healthy forest will be based on sound management, a balance between human and resource needs, and a long-term perspective which will include the means to do the following:

  • Sustain healthy ecosystems and use restoration for continued future use, and
  • Recognize and meet diverse human needs and desires.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Eleanor Torres
    Executive Director
    L.A. Harvest
    1611 S. Hope St., 2nd Fl.
    Los Angeles, CA 90015
    Voice: (213) 742-0429
    Fax: (213) 742-1289


    Redding, California

    Roundtable Vision
    December 8, 1995

    America's forests of the future will be ecologically, socially, and economically sustainable. They will be biologically diverse with diverse ownership and uses. Forest communities will be strong and viable, benefitting from and protecting the health of forest lands.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Russ Henly, Policy Analyst
    California Department of Forestry
    1920 20th St.
    Sacramento, CA 95814
    Voice: (916)-227-2659
    Fax: (916)-227-2672
    E-mail: russ@cdf.ca.gov


    San Bernadino, California

    Roundtable Vision
    December 9, 1995

  • Use technology to heal the forest
  • Create a place for forests to flourish
  • Make up for the forest lost through development
  • More people feeling like they own the forest through more people participating in volunteer opportunities
  • The forest is used as a place to find tranquillity and solitude‹a place that simplifies life's problems
  • Better management of space and division of resources
  • The forest is a place that unites everyone together
  • People know what the forest does and how it works so that they care
  • People love the forest
  • Forests are accessible for use by the public
  • A place without litter
  • The forest is a habitat for animal so all things are preserved

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Kris Komar
    San Bernadino National Forest
    1824 S. Commerce Ceter Circle
    San Bernadino, CA 92408
    Voice: (909) 884-6634
    Fax: (909) 383-5770
    Email: 245603@mci.com


    San Diego, California

    Roundtable Vision
    December 2, 1995

    A forest is a natural setting or naturalized open space, which supports a diversified ecosystem and is largely self-sustaining. A forest includes: Public lands, private lands, Indian reservations and military bases; a diverse mix of land uses, vegetation, woodlands, lots, ranch lands and grass lands; defined wilderness areas; places of dark sky, quiet and solitude; restored ecosystems as well as pristine areas; watersheds which protect for flood control, urban water sources, canyons and habitats; natural resources whose use and consumption are sustainably maintained over time; habitat for fish and wildlife; areas of human habitation; recreational areas for the public; and roads and rails with public access.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Anne Fege
    Forest Supervisor
    Cleveland National Forest
    10845 Rancho Bernardo Rd
    San Diego, CA 92127-2107
    Voice: (619) 674-2901
    Fax: (619) 673-6192


    Grand Junction, Colorado

    Roundtable Vision
    November 30-December 1, 1995

    America's forests will be a mosaic of forest types and ownerships, private and public. Collectively, they will be productive, healthy, diverse and sustainable. All gifts of the forests will be honored. These include clean water, wildlife habitat, timber, beauty, recreation, grazing, wilderness, and places for seclusion, spirituality, and learning. Every child will have the opportunity to walk in forests.

    Decisions about forests will be made in partnership between citizens, local communities, stakeholders, managers and scientists. Gridlock and conflict will be replaced by trust, respect, and collaboration. Decisions will instill public confidence in forests and their future.

    Institutional barriers to collaborative stewardship will be eliminated and decisions will meaningfully involve both local and national interests. Communication about forests will be open and frequent.

    Forests will be abundant, well-managed, and used in a manner which respects and provides for the broad range of values of current and future generations. Goals will be clear and measurable, incorporate multiple uses of forests, and address the needs of both people and natural communities. Forest managers will have a long-range view and understand the global, as well as local and national implications of their actions.

    Education will be a the heart of our experience with forests. Forests will serve as outdoor classrooms, helping people understand their connections to the natural world. Learning will start with children and continue life-long. Americans will understand the many values of forests and take personal responsibility for their well-being. We will work together to ensure that all Americans, in ways and places most appropriate, have access to all the gifts afforded by America's forests.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Joyce Berry, Professor
    Department of Foreest Resources
    Colorado State University
    Fort Collins, CO 80523
    Voice: (303)-491-5405
    Fax: (303)-491-6754


    Haddam, Connecticut

    Roundtable Vision
    July 12 & 19, 1995

    America's forests will be at least as extensive and diverse as those which existed in 1995, and they will be accessible to both urban and rural populations. These healthy, productive forests will be found on a mix of public and private lands, and will range from preserves to forests managed within a scientific and aesthetic framework. They will provide a wide variety of human and nonhuman goods, services, and values in a manner that is sustainable and reinforces ecosystem integrity.

    American's forests will be experienced and understood by citizens who have learned to live in ecological, economic, and spiritual balance with the forests. The intimate relationship the American people have with their forests will help to guide the personal, social, and political decisions they make which directly or indirectly affect the forests. These decisions concerning the forests will be reached through a process of consensus rather than confrontation.

    Americans will recognize and value the unique constraints and opportunities presented by their local forests; for instance, in the coming century Connecticut's forest land will be predominantly in private ownership, in contrast to many other parts of the country. Americans will also acknowledge the role their forests have in the regional ecosystem and its global context.

    America's twenty-first century forests will continue to provide Americans with a tranquil retreat from their daily lives while they serve as a sustained source of our nation's wealth.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    John Hibbard
    Executive Director
    Connecticut Forest and Park Association
    16 Meriden Road
    Rockfall, CT 06481-2961
    Voice: (203) 346-2372
    Fax: (203) 347-7463


    District of Columbia

    Roundtable Vision
    November 17, 1995

    America's forests are sustainable, productive, healthy, ecologically functional, and diverse. They are managed to meet a broad range of ecological, economic, and social values and benefits, in recognition of international, national, state, community, and landowner interests.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Jim Giltmier
    Pinchot Institute
    6118 Hibbling Avenue
    Springfield, VA 22150
    Voice: (703)-912-9535
    Fax: (703)-912-9535


    Lake City, Florida

    Roundtable Vision
    January 13, 1996

    America's forests are a healthy, sustainable mosaic of diverse and productive forest ecosystems yielding both commodity and non-commodity values to help meet the needs of the world.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Nancy Arny, Professor
    School of Forest Resources and Conservation
    University of Florida
    P.O. Box 110420
    Gainesville, FL 32611
    Voice: (904)-846-0882
    Fax: (904)-846-1277
    Email: arny@oak.circa.ufl.edu


    Savannah, Georgia

    Roundtable Vision
    September 29, 1995

    America's forests will be managed for all the benefits that can be accrued from them. This management will provide for forests that are healthy, vigorous, and productive and will allow people to utilize all the goods and services forests are capable of producing. Management will be geared to improve both the quality of forest resources and the quantity of our forests. In meeting this vision, we will recognize that while we desire the production of diverse forested ecosystems sustained for productivity, biological diversity, water resource values, and wildlife habitat, we must respect the rights of individual landowners to make choices on their land. Americans will be better informed about the nature of our forest resource and recognize that "management of forests" implies many different regimes--from no activity to very intense activity. A well-informed public will accept responsibility for understanding all values provided by forests, including the conservative use of their products. This understanding will lead to a reasonable balance between forests that are highly managed and those that are unique and special and protected indefinitely.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Fred Haeussler, Past President of SAF
    7003 Sandnettles Drive
    Savannah, GA 31410
    Voice: (912)-897-4491
    Fax: (912)-238-7663


    Moscow, Idaho

    Roundtable Vision
    August 29, 1995

    To sustain the finite resources of the forests, a balance must be achieved that provides for the entire range of human uses and values. A broader understanding of the history and complexity of forest management and forest ownership will provide for informed management decisions.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Chuck Hatch, Dean
    College of Forestry
    University of Idaho
    Moscow, ID 83844-1133
    Voice: (208)-885-7311
    Fax: (208-885-6226


    Jasper, Indiana

    Roundtable Vision
    August 26, 1995

    We visualize the forests of the U.S., in the next several generations, to be of the same or greater land area. Healthy, productive forests will be sustained for a variety of uses and benefits for both people and native species, using management strategies to maintain and enhance forests.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Scott Roberts, Professor
    Department of Forestry and Natural Resources
    Forestry Building
    Purdue University
    West Lafayette, IN 47907-1159
    Voice: (317)-494-3584
    Fax: (317)-496-2422


    Wabash, Indiana

    Roundtable Vision
    September 9, 1995

    The vision for America's forests is an expanding, well-distributed forest across the landscape: a diverse, resilient, sustainable forest connecting urban and rural areas, using riparian zones where appropriate. Management shall be scientifically sound and economically efficient, balanced in terms of the many values a forest can yield, and responsive to the need for biological diversity, including late-successional stage (i.e., old growth) forests. American forests and their management shall be supported by a knowledgeable public, actively engaged in their stewardship.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Scott Roberts, Professor
    Department of Forestry and Nautral Resources
    Forestry Building
    Purdue University
    West Lafayette, IN 47907-1159
    Voice: (317)-494-3584
    Fax: (317)-496-2422


    Ames, Iowa

    Roundtable Vision
    December 20, 1995

    The enhanced and maintained forest ecosystems of the future will provide sustainable benefits to meet individual and societal needs.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    David Countryman
    Deparment of Forestry
    Iowa State University
    251 Bessey Hall
    Ames, IA 50011
    Voice: (515)-294-7703
    Fax: (515)-294-2995
    Email: davidc@iastate.edu


    Alexandria, Louisiana

    Roundtable Vision
    January 16, 1996

    America's forests will be environmentally, socially, and economically sustainable, while providing multiple uses including wood, water, wildlife, and recreation.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Joseph Chang
    Programs Leader
    School of Foresttry, Wildlife, &;Fisheries
    Louisiana State University
    Baton Rouge, LA 70803-6202
    Voice: (504) 388-4167
    Fax: (504) 388-4227


    Augusta, Maine

    Roundtable Vision
    January 11, 1996

    We see a Maine forest with extensive forests rich in natural resources and values cherished by residents and visitors; timber, fiber and wood for forest products and energy supporting successful businesses and providing stable jobs for residents; lakes, ponds, rivers and streams unspoiled by pollution or crowding human development; viable communities in which people can live, work, raise families; forest tracts large enough for wide-ranging wildlife and large enough to meet recreational and spiritual needs, protected and managed in ways that sustain the ecological functioning of the forest system and the diversity of plant and animal species; a culture deriving its identity from the environment in which it has evolved.

    The Roundtable values the uniqueness of Maine's forests including ownership patterns, regional, biological and community differences, traditional ways of life and patterns of ownership continuing with residents of towns, villages and the forests themselves more certain ways of staying there and securing livelihoods from the land around them. The Roundtable sees outdoor recreation and tourism compatible with the natural environment and dependent on the qualities which now characterize the region.

    The Roundtable visualizes a community of informed citizens participating in informed decision-making. The Roundtable recognizes the need to adjust, adapt, and plan for change. The Roundtable's picture of the future of Maine's forests is of a landscape of interlocking parts and pieces inseparable, reinforcing each other: local communities, industrial forest land, family and individual ownership, small woodlots, recreational land, public and private conservation land.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Judith Berg
    Small Woodland Owners Association
    153 Hospital Street
    Augusta, ME 04332
    Voice: (207) 336-2396
    Fax: (207) 336-2396


    Baltimore, Maryland

    Roundtable Vision
    January 6, 1996

    We envision healthy, thriving, inviting green (urban) communities with the elements of our vision being:

  • Enhanced biodiverse ecosystems
  • Enhanced environmental awareness through education
  • Enhanced economic and social resources and values
  • Linked communities to/through green spaces
  • Clean, green, safe urban natural environments...through CITIES: Communities
    Invested
    Thru
    Improved
    Environmental
    Stewardship

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Paul Jahnige
    Community Forester
    Urban Resources Initiative
    2600 Madison Avenue
    Baltimore, MD 21217
    Voice: (410) 396-0718
    Fax: (410) 396-7945
    Email: pjoool@epfl2.epflbalto.org


    Amherst, Massachusetts

    Roundtable Vision
    January 13, 1996

    Let There Be Forests! In the future, we see communities of educated individuals that recognize their ties to the forest. These communities will make decisions which reflect that forests are varied ecosystems that contain indispensable social, economic and natural components. These indispensable components will be derived from a mix of wild and managed forests.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Chris Donnelly
    University of Massachusetts
    Department of Forestry
    Holdsworth Hall
    Amherst, MA 01003
    Voice: (203) 484-2512
    Email: cmd@forwild.umass.edu


    Gaylord, Michigan

    Roundtable Vision
    November 8, 1995

    Our vision for America's forests in the year 2025 is: thriving, healthy, expanding forest ecosystems; rich in native species managed for sustainable recreational biodiversity and commodity values; serving both public and private interests recognizing rights and responsibilities; using the best possible management practices based upon credible science and policy driven by an informed engaged people.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Mike Moore
    Society of American Foresters - Michigan
    4621 Meaford Street
    Voice: (517)-323-7685
    Fax: (517)-323-2443
    Email: mdmoore@umich.edu


    St. Paul, Minnesota

    Roundtable Vision
    June 29, 1995

    American forests are managed with primary consideration given to long-term ecosystem integrity and sustainability and to sustain healthy economies and human communities. Management decisions are based on credible science and community values. The public understands and appreciates the forests and is involved in and supports forest management decisions.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Mel Baughman, Forest Resources Extension Specialist
    University of Minnesota, Department of Forest Resourcers
    1530 North Cleveland Ave.
    St. Paul, MN 55108-1027
    Voice: (612)-625
    Fax: (612)625-5212
    E-mail: mbaughma@forestry.umn.edu


    Lake of the Ozarks, Missouri

    Roundtable Vision
    November 16, 1995

    The forests of the future will be abundant, healthy and perpetual, with a variety of plants and animals. They will benefit society and meet societal wants and needs.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Wayne Wittimeyer
    Missouri Department of Conservation
    P.O. Box 180
    Jefferson City, MO 65102
    Voice: (314)-751-4115 ext. 627
    Fax: (314)-526-6670


    Kalispell, Montana

    Roundtable Vision
    January 13, 1996

    We will strive for responsible human use of American forests that will sustain ecological and economic systems and maintain a full range of forest values for future generations.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Don Snow
    Northern Lights Institute
    300 East Crestline Drive
    Missoula, MT 59803
    Voice: (406)-549-8526
    Fax: (406)-549-8526


    Libby, Montana

    Roundtable Vision
    November 28, 1995

    To manage and maintain a healthy forest in concert with viable economic, social and physical systems. Recognizing that each of these systems is complex and dynamic, management of the forest will provide for a range of needs and desires for present and future generations.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Bruce Vincent
    Communities for a Greater Northwest
    P.O. Box 1320
    Libby, MT 59923
    Voice: (406)293-8844
    Fax: (406) 293-4739


    Reno, Nevada

    Roundtable Vision
    January 23, 1996

    Our forests, including the urban and community forests, will be healthy, functioning, productive, and dynamic ecosystems that provide clean and abundant water, soil, air, fiber, forage, habitat, recreation, and biodiversity for current and future generations. The sustained productivity and diversity of the watersheds and ecosystems will provide and enhance social, economic and biological resources for the nation. Our public will understand and be educated about the importance of all forests, including forests which range in ownership from small private tracts to publicly-owned lands and in character from wildlands to urban.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Ed Smith
    Range Education Institute
    P.O. Box 338
    Minden, NV 89423
    Voice: (303) 355-7070
    Fax: (303) 355-5059


    Durham, New Hampshire

    [a.k.a. "The New England Forest Roundtable]

    Roundtable Vision
    December 12, 1995

    The Northeast forests will be comprised of a diverse and complex mosaic of both privately and publicly owned lands, managed in accordance with criteria designed to protect and enhance a broad range of ecological, economic, social and spiritual values and benefits. These criteria will be formulated by means of open, democratic, public processes, recognizing that all citizens have a stake in the health and welfare of our forests. At the same time, these processes must give due consideration to the interests, whether economic, social, or aesthetic, of private landowners and respect their rights as stakeholders in the criteria that are established through these processes.

    When location, size and resources permit, certain forests will be cared for so as to sustain the long-term economic health of these communities that are wholly or substantially dependent on harvesting these forests for wood products and/or their recreational usage. All forests will be managed with the best unbiased scientific methods then available to insure a balance of successional stages including old growth and the integrity of natural processes, provide and protect habitats for diverse native species, and guarantee long-term ecological health. These forests will provide a full range of options, some not yet known or foreseen, for future generations. Through public processes, public and private wild lands, including some that will be set aside as wilderness, will be identified and assembled so as to create a region-wide connected forest network that will protect and enhance entire ecosystems.

    Informed citizens who have come to understand and appreciate the economic, natural and spiritual balance within the forests, and who respect the practices applied to their health and maintenance, will experience the region's forests and become advocates for their protection.

    Public policies affecting the Northeast forests at the federal, state and local levels will be integrated, applied in a well-reasoned and consistent manner, arrived at through participatory democracy, and based upon facts and ecological values which incorporate fundamental scientific principles.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Ed DeVenne
    New England Forestry Foundation
    P.O. Box 1099
    283 Old Dunstable Rd
    Groton, MA 01450
    Voice: (508)-448-8380


    New Brunswick, New Jersey

    Roundtable Vision
    November 17, 1995

    Conservation and management of all forestland resources, both and private, to assure healthy vigorous forest ecosystems. Through stewardship and public awareness, this will assure biodiversity, productivity, and countless benefits to society.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    John Benton
    Chair, New Jersey SAF
    New Jersey Forestry Services
    CN-404
    Trenton, NJ 08625-0404
    Voice: (609)-984-0620
    Fax: (609)-984-0378


    Santa Fe, New Mexico

    Roundtable Vision
    January 9, 1996

    The report received from Santa Fe did not present a combined vision and principles consensus among the four groups that participated in the roundtable. However, in a review of the findings from the four separate groups, the following themes appear to be common threads:

  • Large government not such a controlling force; government systems provide for much greater role and influence by local communities to engage in decision making that affects their sustainability.
  • Will have better ways to engage, collaborate, communicate and problem-solve; less litigation.
  • Forest management practices occur over large landscapes.
  • Credible science guides decision-making (not all science currently seen as credible).
  • Traditional values and lifestyles of the Southwest will be preserved.
  • There will be a balance of how economic, environmental and cultural concerns are addressed throughout forest management policies and practices.
  • Healthy forests for future generations.
  • Broad range of multiple uses available and accessible.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Rosemary Romero
    Western Network
    811 St. Michael's Drive
    Santa Fe, NM 87505
    Voice: (505) 982-9805
    Fax: (505) 983-8812


    Fly Creek, New York

    Roundtable Vision
    December 2, 1995

    Forest stewardship of the future will balance the long-term global and local needs of the environment, culture, and economy. Forests will become a more accessible, better understood, and appreciated part of our lives. Forest use will be guided by ethical standards. Forests of the future will reflect a diversity of forest systems including the protection of old growth forest to maintain endemic species. Forests of the future will contain large continuous tracts and connections between them. Forest use will be balanced between private and public property interests with special attention to the development of tax policy which will ensure that forest land will continue to be used as forest.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Dinnie Sloman
    Executive Director
    Catskill Forest Association, Inc.
    P.O. Box 336
    Arkville, NY 12406
    Voice: (914)-586-3054
    Fax: (914)-586-3044
    Email: dinnie_sloman@nyforest.edu


    New York, New York

    Roundtable Vision
    January 10, 1996

    American forests found in urban, suburban, and rural communities must be accepted and acknowledged as a national interest and as an intrinsic, historical, and cultural treasure with a value beyond economic.

    Urban and suburban forest planning will foster conservation and restoration while both involving and being accountable to the community.

    Forest management is necessary everywhere in some form and must have as its goals ecosystem integrity, biological diversity, and efficient use guided by the best science and community values. Our practices should provided models for forest use and conservation throughout the world.

    Our forests are cultural and educational resources that must be made accessible to a broad cross-section of society, the values and techniques of forest stewardship must be disseminated through increased environmental education.

    Forest support must included long, sustainable funding and volunteerism within the urban, suburban and rural communities. Protection and conservation of diverse healthy forests should proceed under the presumption of no-net-loss of forest area and forest quality from one generation to the next. Not only increased funding but increased public ownership of forest land is required for this to happen.

    Scientific research and its applications to urban, suburban, and rural forests will be expanded and made available to all stakeholders.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Eliza Clevland
    National Audubon Society
    700 Broadway
    New York, NY 10003-9562
    Voice: (212) 979-3061
    Fax: (212) 353-0321


    Paul Smiths, New York

    Roundtable Vision
    January 19, 1996

    We see American forests as dynamic communities that are essential to the ecological, economic and social health of the nation. These forests comprise a diversity of ecosystems and should continue to provide for a multiplicity of land uses and resource values. It is important that we encourage a shift in our perspective toward long term economic and management models to ensure the sustainability of our forest resources. Society must recognize the rights of private propertyowners and reward stewardship that enhances public values and encourages open space protection. The public needs to be educated so that citizens understand the complexity of forests and the contributions forests make to society. America's forests need to be recognized as part of a global system whose health is essential to the maintenance of our planet.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Mike Rechlin, Professor
    Paul Smiths College
    Paul Smiths, NY 12970
    Voice: (518) 327-6236
    Fax: (518) 327-6369


    Corvallis, Oregon

    Roundtable Vision
    November 28, 1995

    Oregon's forests will be valued by an informed society. They will be diverse, resilient, healthy and productive, and will be a part of sustainable ecosystems. They also will contribute to and be managed for the sustainability of global natural resources, biodiversity, and human communities, providing an array of benefits for present and future generations.

    (The Corvallis Roundtable differed in focus from other AFC roundtables being held around the country in that participants were asked to consider the role of Oregon's forests in the context of the global environment, and global resources demand.)

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    George Brown, Dean
    College of Forestry
    Oregon State University
    154 Peavy Hall.
    Covallis, OR
    Voice: (503) 737-2211
    Fax: (503) 737-2906


    La Grande, Oregon

    Roundtable Vision
    October 18, 1995

    America's forests will be healthy, productive, diversified, and sustainable. Active forest stewardship will contribute to a high quality of life for people and essential habitats for all natural inhabitants across the forest landscape. Our forests will be actively and adaptively managed to meet social and economic needs and desires within each forest's biological capabilities.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    John Henshaw
    Blue Mountain Natural Resources Institute
    1401 Gekeler Ln.
    Le Grande, OR 97858
    Voice: (503) 962-6537


    Portland, Oregon

    Roundtable Vision
    July 19, 1995

    Forests are part of who we are. They are a part of our past which we respect, and will be part of our future: a legacy we value, a trust we carry. Forests today reflect natural events and bear the hand-print of past human choice. Our actions today shape our forests of tomorrow and will be evaluated by future generations. America's forests of the 21st century will be biologically, socially, and economically sustainable; diverse in ownership, outputs, and conditions; and productive in values which enhance the quality of life for all Americans.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Craig Shinn, Asst. Professor
    Deparrtment of Public Administration
    Portland State University
    Box 751
    Portland, OR 97207-0751
    Voice: (503) 725-8220


    Columbia, South Carolina

    Roundtable Vision
    December 12, 1995

    American forests should be managed as sustainable, diverse, healthy ecosystems. Decisions should be based on scientific principles with regards for balancing private property rights and responsibilities, economic feasibility, and public needs, to obtain the highest and best use. It is hoped that this vision will serve as a global model.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Tom Jewell
    Public Affairs Forester
    Westvaco Corp.
    180 Westvaco Road
    Summerville, SC 29484
    Voice: (803) 851-4636
    Fax: (803) 821-4044


    Rapid City, South Dakota

    Roundtable Vision
    December 2, 1995

    American forests are biologically diverse ecosystems managed in a sustainable manner to ensure their perpetuity based upon scientific knowledge and human values to achieve economic, social, spiritual and emotional needs and values of our local communities and nation.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    John Ball
    South Dakota State University
    Box 2140 A
    Brookings, SD 57007
    Voice: (605) 688-4737
    Fax: (605) 688-4452
    Email: hflp@mg.sdstate.edu


    Nashville, Tennessee

    Roundtable Vision
    November 11, 1995

    A storehouse of genetically diverse biological resources including all members of the forest community, managed for economic, recreational, spiritual, ecological benefit of society. A healthy, productive, sustainable, forest providing multiple uses and values. The health of the American forests will be characterized by productivity for all plant and animal species, biodiversity, timber & non-timber (traditional & nontraditional) values. Our forests will be diverse and sustain human and nonhuman values. Our forests will be managed for long-term sustainability of the forest intended to produce a variety of products for human use and at the same time maintain and protect environmental values (watersheds, soils, air quality, aesthetics wildlife, plants, etc).

    Healthy sustainable forest lands which are managed in such a manner to provide for continued enjoyment and to insure continuance of the diverse habitat for the protection of native species. A shift from urban tourism to urban education within the forest setting. The best education experiences demonstrate the conflicts and resolves of humanity in the forest to meet all needs in a sustainable way. Healthy and productive forests which supply both tangible and intangible resources and values for the present and future users. Maintain a healthy and diverse forest ecosystem. A healthy forest provides multiple benefits for a diversity of interests including human and nonhuman species over long periods of time.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    David Ostermeier
    Professor, Dept. of Forest Wildlife, and Fisheries
    University of Tennessee
    P.O. Box 1071
    Knoxville, TN 37901-1071
    Voice: (615)-974-8843
    Fax: (615)-974-4714


    Nacogdoches, Texas

    Roundtable Vision
    January 12, 1996

  • Healthy, productive forests that will provide for all of society's diverse needs on a sustainable basis, while recognizing the rights, responsibilities and objectives of the private and public forest land owner.
  • Forests that are managed, protected, sustained, and renewed to provide a perpetual source of wood products, water, biodiversity, recreation, and other desired attributes to best meet society's needs.
  • Forested stands (public as well as private) should maintain a broad diversity of plants and animals that would naturally live there. (Biodiversity)
  • A solid educational program for understanding of natural forest elements including wildlife, plants, water, etc.
  • Forests are managed to sustain a profitable return on forest products providing jobs and enhancing the quality of life from basic needs to self fulfillment for Americans.
  • Forests are managed based on sound science.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Paul Risk
    College of Forestry
    Steven F. Austin State University
    P.O Box 6109
    Nacogdoches, TX 75962
    Voice: (409) 468-2492
    Fax: (409) 468-2448
    Email: f_riskph@titan.sfasu.edu


    Charlottesville, Virginia

    Roundtable Vision
    December 15, 1995

    Forests are an essential integrated system that maintain a balance of forest types, outputs, public and private ownership, access and availability. Forests have natural untouched areas, as well as areas managed for specialized use, which are understood, valued, and appreciated by everyone.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Jim Chamberlain, Ph.D. Student
    Virginia Technological University
    2705 Newton Court
    Blacksburg, VA 24060
    Voice: (540) 951-0495
    Fax: (540) 231-3698
    E-mail: jmchambe@vt.edu


    Seattle, Washington

    Roundtable Vision
    November 6, 1995

    We envision that, in 50 years: American forests are abundant, diverse, and healthy ecosystems, that provide a full range of values and sustainable uses for this and future generations. The American people respect these forests and recognize the forests' global context.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Amy Solomon
    Executive Director
    Northwest Renewable Resources Center
    1411 Fourth Ave., Suite 1510
    Seattle, WA 98101-2216
    Voice: (206) 623-7361
    Fax: (206) 467-1640


    Spokane, Washington

    Roundtable Vision
    December 12, 1995

    We envision that, in 50 years: American forests are abundant, diverse, and healthy ecosystems, that provide a full range of values and sustainable uses for this and future generations. The American people respect these forests and recognize the forests' global context.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Rebecca Mack
    Executive Director
    Northwest Natural Resources Institute
    P.O. Box 2147
    Spokane, WA 99210
    Voice: (509) 459-4112
    Fax: (509) 747-0077


    Flatwoods, West Virginia

    Roundtable Vision
    January 12, 1996

    We see the forest as a valued community; humans, trees, other plant and animal life, soil, minerals, air, water, and aesthetics. We see the forest as a well-managed, multi-use resource providing not only for present, but future generations. We see public entities, private landowners, industry, and the general public cooperating to ensure a diverse, healthy, and vigorous forest that provides the optimal good.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Lou McCreery
    United States Forest Service
    180 Canfield Street
    Morgantown, WV 26505
    Voice: (304) 285-1536
    Fax: (304) 285-1655


    Wausau, Wisconsin

    Roundtable Vision
    October 28, 1995

    To maintain a dynamic forest environment and meet the needs of a diverse society, being flexible in recognizing and achieving a balance of those needs based on shared values.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Kirsten Held, Issues/Outreach Coordinator
    Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources
    Bureau of Forestry
    P.O. Box 7921
    Madison, WI 53707
    Voice: (608) 264-6036
    Fax: (608) 266-8576


    Moran, Wyoming

    Roundtable Vision
    October 7, 1995

    The Earth and its resources sustain life. Forests will reflect natural events and bear the imprint of human choice. Therefore, forests will be managed dynamically to accommodate social, economic, and cultural needs while insuring the integrity and sustainability of unique and complex forest systems.

    Roundtable organizing committee contact:
    Art King
    8635 Ditch Creek
    Kelly, WY 83011-0207
    Voice: (307)-733-7711
    Fax: (307)-739-9388


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