Emily Greenwood

Professor of Classics
Director of Undergraduate Studies in Classics

Emily Greenwood studied Classics at Cambridge University, where she gained her BA, MPhil, and PhD degrees. After finishing her PhD she was a research fellow at St Catharine’s College, Cambridge (2000–2002), before joining the department of Classics at the University of St Andrews where she was lecturer in Greek from 2002–2008. She joined the Classics department at Yale in July 2009.

Greenwood booksHer research interests include ancient Greek historiography, Greek prose literature of the fifth and fourth centuries BCE, twentieth century classical receptions (especially uses of Classics in Africa, Britain, the Caribbean, and Greece), Classics and Postcolonialism, and the theory and practice of translating the ‘classics’ of Greek and Roman literature. She is more than happy to talk to students who are interested in working in any of these areas.

Recent Publications

  • ‘The Greek Thucydides: Venizelos’ Translation of Thucydides, in K. Harloe and N. Morley (eds.) Thucydides and the Modern World: Reception, Reinterpretation & Influence from the Renaissance to the Present. Cambridge University Press, 2012.
  • ‘Corruption and the Corruptibility of Logos in Greek Historiography,’ Acta Classica: Special Issue on Corruption & Integrity in Ancient Greece and Rome, 2012: 63-83.0.

Click here for CV

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CLCV 256 / HUMS 445

Ancient Athenian Civilization

Fall 2013, TTh 1:00 – 2:15

This course fulfills the area requirement in the humanities and arts (HU)

A survey lecture course offering an introduction to the city of ancient Athens and its political institutions, culture, society, and history from 510 BCE to 323 BCE – a key period of transformation, which saw the emergence of political and cultural institutions that continue to capture our imagination and fertilize contemporary debates. We will be studying ancient Athens from every angle, including politics, law, economics, intellectual culture, performance culture, sex and reproduction, immigration, warfare, and the environment.

Working with a wide range of sources from different media and genres, we will discuss the interpretative challenges posed by the different sources that are typically used to reconstruct the social, political, and cultural history of ancient Athens (from inscriptions on stone, to literary texts, to painted vases). The lectures will be informed by the realization that the ancient ‘Athens’ that we study today is a complex and over-determined city, that has been overwritten with significance by subsequent civilizations and has had countless ideals projected onto it.

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Field Ancient Greek Prose Literature, Classical Receptions

Areas of Research Greek historiography, Greek prose literature of the fifth and fourth centuries BCE, twentieth century classical receptions (especially uses of Classics in Africa, Britain, the Caribbean, and Greece), Classics and Postcolonialism, Classics and Translation

 

Contact details

Phone (203) 432-9457

Fax (203) 432-1079

emily.greenwood@yale.edu