AIA - New Haven Society of the
Archaeological Institute of America
2009-2010 Lecture Series

Judith M. Barringer
Tuesday, October 27, 2009 at 4:30 P.M.
Sheldon H. Solow Lecture

Yale University
Phelps Hall, Room 407

Before the construction of the Temple of Zeus in ca.470 B.C.E., the Altis or sacred area at Olympia was dotted with many structures, including military and athletic victory monuments. Why were these monuments oriented eastward and why were Trojan War themes deployed for two of the most prominent monuments? This lecture explores these and other questions. Read more . . .

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The Flavian Women: A Family Drama on Coins

Susan Wood
Tuesday, January 26, 2010 at 4:30 PM
William E. Metcalf Lecture

Yale University
Phelps Hall, Room 407

Three women figured prominently in the public imagery and official coinage of the Flavain dynasty, an obscure family that unexpectedly came to power after the fall of Nero and the civil wars of 68 C.E. These coins were an attempt to portray the Flavian dynasty as happy and harmonious were an unsuccessful propaganda effort. As such, they offer us an intriguing study of a public relations program that failed, a situation that has repeated itself many times in earlier and later history. Read more . . .

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Nancy C. Wilkie
Monday, March 1, 2010 at 4:30 P.M.
Charles Eliot Norton Memorial Lecture

Yale University
Phelps Hall, Room 407

The island of Sri Lanka has been known by many names throughout its history. Although early Iron Age culture was introduced to the island at the beginning of the First Millennium B.C.E., archaeological work in Sri Lanka has concentrated on large monastic settlements which were established in ca. 300 B.C.E - 300 C.E. and mark the spread of Buddhist influence over the island. Little attention has been paid to secular sites, or to Hindu, Islamic and Christian sites and structures.  The challenge that lies ahead for the next generation of Sri Lankan archaeologists is the investigation of sites and regions that will provide a broader and more balanced picture of the island’s past. Read more . . .

 

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