AIA - New Haven Society of the
Archaeological Institute of America
2008-2009 Lecture Series

The New Haven Society of the AIA is pleased to host the following 2008-2009 lectures. All lectures are open to the public and are free of charge. Lectures are designed for a mixed audience of professionals, students and laypersons. All that is required to attend any of these lectures is an interest in archaeology and a desire to learn. Each lecture will be followed by a reception which is also open to the public.

All lectures will be held at Yale University's Phelps Hall, Room 407. Lectures begin at 4:30 P.M. and are expected to last for around one hour. For directions to Yale University and Phelps Hall, click here.


Andrew Stewart
Monday, November 10, 2008, 4:30 P.M.
Homer A. and Dorothy B. Thompson Lectureship

Yale University
Phelps Hall, Room 407

Using Athenian vase-paintings and Praxiteles’ Aphrodite of Knidos as examples, noted art historian Andrew Stewart will respond to recent feminist critiques of the female nude in Greek art. The lecture will also touch upon the Knidia's legacy in western art. Read more. . .

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The Unsolved Mystery of the Agora Bone Well

Susan I. Rotroff
Tuesday, February 17, 2009, 5:00 P.M. (New Time)
Sheldon H. Solow Lecture

Yale University
Phelps Hall, Room 407

In 1937, a deep well was excavated near the agora, or public center, of ancient Athens. In addition to the usual assortment of pottery and amphora fragments, the well also contained a large collection of human bones, including those of about 450 newborn infants. Susan Rotroff will present the results of an interdisciplinary study examining the contents and mysteries of the well. Read more . . .

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Andrea Berlin
Tuesday, March 24, 2009, 4:30 P.M.
Martha Sharp Joukowsky Lectureship

Yale University
Phelps Hall, Room 407

Recent discoveries at Tel Kedesh, the largest tel site in Israel's Upper Galilee, suggest that this was not a simple Phoenician farming town, as suggested by literary sources. Andrea Berlin will discuss excavations at the site, which provide new insights on the political and social interactions between Jews, Phoenicians, and Greeks in second century B.C.E. Palestine. Read more. . .

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