Yale Program for Recovery and Community Health

Yale Program for Recovery
and Community Health
Erector Square, Bldg. One
319 Peck Street
New Haven, CT 06513

Business Office:
Ph. 203-764-7594
Ph. 203-764-7582
Fx. 203-764-7595

Elizabeth Flanagan, PhD

Assistant Professor, Yale Program for Recovery and Community Health

Elizabeth Flanagan, PhD Elizabeth.Flanagan@Yale.edu
Phone: 203.764.7592
Fax: 203.764.7595

Program for Recovery & Community Health
Department of Psychiatry
Yale University School of Medicine
319 Peck Street, Bldg. One
New Haven, CT 06513

Profile: I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the Yale School of Medicine. I have a K01 award to receive public health training and to study stigma in mental health settings. I also have pilot funding to develop an anti-stigma intervention for primary care settings using the photovoice method that highlights the strengths, interests, and contributions of people with mental illness.

Professional Interests: My current research interests focus on two broad areas: stigma in mental health settings and the revision of the DSM-V and ICD-11.

Regarding stigma, I have a K01 award to conduct a multi-method assessment of stigma in mental health settings. The goals of this research are: 1) To empirically test a theoretically-based, comprehensive public health model of stigma in mental health settings using established measures to determine the aspects of stigma that are most important in mental health settings and, using experimental vignettes, to manipulate a variable in this model (i.e., attributions about the causes of mental illness) to observe its effects on other model variables, 2) To use a laboratory-based behavioral paradigm to experimentally test whether peer professionals elicit less anxiety but higher ratings of effectiveness and likability than credentialed professionals, and 3) To use qualitative research methods to understand the social context of mental health settings and the lived experience of consumers and clinicians in mental health settings in order to enhance the understanding of the empirical results from the earlier studies.

I have also received a pilot grant from the NetHaven and the Yale Center for Clinical Investigation to improve primary care and reduce stigma for people with serious mental illness. This community-based participatory action research project, “Snap it” is based on the photovoice method where people with mental illness take pictures and develop accompanying narratives to highlight their strengths, interests, and contributions. People with mental illness will participate in an 8 week photovoice training where they learn how to take pictures and develop narratives about their experiences. During this training they will meet biweekly with their primary care providers to discuss their projects. At the end of the training, all people with mental illness present their projects in a community forum. This pilot project will develop this intervention and test its efficacy so that the effectiveness of this intervention in comparison to other stigma interventions can be tested in further research.

Another primary research interest of mine is to increase consumer input into the DSM-V and ICD-11 development process and to increase the validity of diagnostic criteria by making it more similar to the personal experience of mental illness. We are currently analyzing data about the personal experience of schizophrenia and are developing publications about the relationship between the personal experience of schizophrenia and its depiction in the DSM.

Last, I have always had research interests in improving the clinical utility of the DSM and ICD. I am currently collaborating as part of the US site for the World Health’s Organization study of clinicians’ conceptualization of mental illness in order to improve the clinical utility of the ICD-11.

Personal Interests: My husband, 3 children, and I love being outside at the beach, at a park, or in our own backyard. I also sing professionally in the early music Schola at St. Mary’s Church in New Haven and with the Saint Gregory Society.

Curriculum Vitae

Selected Publications

Examples of tabletop taxonomies from Flanagan, E.H., Keeley, J., & Blashfield, R.K.  An alternative hierarchical organization of the mental disorders of DSM-IV.  Journal of Abnormal Psychology.  In press.

Examples of merge-sort taxonomies from Flanagan, E.H., Keeley, J., & Blashfield, R.K.  An alternative hierarchical organization of the mental disorders of DSM-IV.  Journal of Abnormal Psychology.  In press.

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